Understanding Latino/a Families Strengths as the First Step to Support

Concurrent Sessions 3

Darren Garcia, Lucia Miranda, Estafania Miranda, Kristina Gordon, Xun Liu, Naomi Wheeler, Michael Broda, Andrew Daire, Vanessa O’Hare, & Sandy-Ann Griffith, Jenene Case Pease, Laura McKee, Catherine O'Neal, Jena Michel, Dena Henry, Jennifer Doty, Iris Borowsky, Javiera Monardez, Elizabeth Valdes, Laura Rietveld, Michele Allen

Facilitator: Mark A. Lopez

3:15 PM
4:30 PM
Location
Royal Palm 1
Session #
136
Session Type
Paper
Session Focus
  • Research
Organized By
  • Education & Enrichment

About the Session

  • 136-01 - Understanding Relationship Strengths and Concerns of Latino Couples in the U.S.: A Qualitative Inductive Approach
    By Darren Garcia, Lucia Miranda, Estafania Miranda, Kristina Gordon
  • 136-02 - Relationship Satisfaction Trajectories Among Low-Income Ethnic Minority Couples After Intervention
    By Xun Liu, Naomi Wheeler, Michael Broda, Andrew Daire, Vanessa O’Hare, & Sandy-Ann Griffith, Jenene Case Pease
  • 136-03 - Depression in Hispanic Youth: Contributions of Parenting, Emotion Socialization, and Cognitive Style
    By Laura McKee, Catherine O'Neal, Jena Michel, Dena Henry
  • 136-04 - Latino/a Parents' Technology Use: Implications for Building the Padres Informados Mobile App
    By Jennifer Doty, Iris Borowsky, Javiera Monardez, Elizabeth Valdes, Laura Rietveld, Michele Allen

Abstract(s)

Understanding Relationship Strengths and Concerns of Latino Couples in the U.S.: A Qualitative Inductive Approach

By Darren Garcia, Lucia Miranda, Estafania Miranda, Kristina Gordon

Research examining how culture shapes U.S. Latino couples’ perceptions of their relationship strengths and concerns is lacking. Eleven semi-structured interviews with U.S. Latino couples in committed romantic relationships were transcribed verbatim in Spanish. The first, second, and third authors are bilingual and analyzed the interview data. Grounded theory was used to guide interpretations of the interview data. Emergent themes included familismo (a sense of family interdependence, collectivism, or inclusiveness), retiro masculino del conflicto (male withdrawal from conflict), estrés aculturativo (acculturative stress), creencias espirituales (spriritual beliefs), and confianza completa (complete trust). A integrative conceptual theoretical model and practice implications are described.

Objectives

The objective of this study is to better understand how Latino couples perceive the strengths and weaknesses in their relationship.  Specifically, this research is concerned with addressing three interrelated questions: (1) what are the strengths and weaknesses in Latino romantic relationships? (2) how can knowledge of these relationship strengths and weaknesses contribute to new theoretical conceptualizations? and (3) in which ways might the emergent themes form this study inform clinical practice and public policy? 

Relationship Satisfaction Trajectories Among Low-Income Ethnic Minority Couples After Intervention

By Xun Liu, Naomi Wheeler, Michael Broda, Andrew Daire, Vanessa O’Hare, & Sandy-Ann Griffith, Jenene Case Pease

This study examined relationship satisfaction trajectories of low-income ethnic minority couples from a pre-intervention assessment to the fifth assessment at 90 days after the Relationship Education intervention. The researchers drew five waves of data from a large, four year, federally funded project - Project TOGETHER.  The results of the dyadic latent growth curve modeling revealed the linearity of growth in relationship satisfaction among non-distressed couples; specifically, both male and female partners had significant positive growth in terms of relationship satisfaction over the intervention. However, the trajectory of distressed couples yielded no linearity of growth in terms of relationship satisfaction. The researchers present a discussion of implications for policy and practice. Keywords: relationship education, relationship satisfaction, latent growth curve modeling, dyadic analysis

Objectives

To evaluate the effectiveness of the Relationship Education (RE) intervention.To analyze the growth of couple relationship through participating the RE intervention. To demonstrate the long-term effect of RE on low-income ethnic minority couples' relationship satisfaction.

Depression in Hispanic Youth: Contributions of Parenting, Emotion Socialization, and Cognitive Style

By Laura McKee, Catherine O'Neal, Jena Michel, Dena Henry

Given that Hispanic youth report higher levels of depression than other youth, identifying malleable risk and projective factors at the individual and family levels is a top priority for informing intervention work. This study used a SEM to examine associations between positive parenting, supportive and unsupportive emotion socialization parenting behaviors, youth negative cognitive style, and youth depressive symptoms in a primarily Hispanic sample. Findings suggest that positive parenting is indirectly associated with youth depression via youth cognitive style while neglecting emotion (an unsupportive emotion socialization response) is associated with youth depression directly and indirectly via youth cognitive style.

Objectives

To inform our understanding of negative cognitive style in Hispanic youth.
To identify malleable risk and protective factors for depression at the individual and family levels.
To examine the impact of general parenting and emotion socialization on youth mental health.

Latino/a Parents' Technology Use: Implications for Building the Padres Informados Mobile App

By Jennifer Doty, Iris Borowsky, Javiera Monardez, Elizabeth Valdes, Laura Rietveld, Michele Allen

We assessed the feasibility of delivering the evidence-informed program Padres Informados Jovenes Preparados via mobile application. In a sample of Latino/a immigrant parents with children 18 or younger (N = 116), 97% of parents reported having access to a cellphone and 85% had access to a data plan.  Results of a linear regression model demonstrated that parents with low parent-child communication and high parental monitoring were most likely to use cellphones for parenting purposes.  Technology attitudes and barriers were not significant, suggesting a shrinking digital divide.  Results imply that mobile technology is a viable means for practitioners, educatiors, and prevention scientists to reach Latino/a immigrant parents.

Objectives

To assess feasibility of using moble technology to deliver a parenting program for Latino/a immigrant parents.To report descriptives regarding Latino immigrant parents' access to mobile technology.To analyze Latino immigrant parents' use of technology for parenting purposes.

Bundle name
Conference Session