Poverty and Upward Mobility

Concurrent Sessions 11
Location
Salon 2
Session #
405
Session Type
Paper
Organized By
  • Ethnic Minorities

About the Session

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  • From Wall Street to Main Street to "El Callejon" (back ally): Economic and Educational Realities of Latino Immigrant Families in the Rural Midwest
    Presented by: Robert Reyes, Ruben Viramontez Anguiano
  • You Moved Up, Did You Forget Us?: African American Intra-Familial Social Mobility
    Presented by: Pearl Stewart, Gwendolyn Parker-Ames
  • Economic Hardship and Mexican American Adolescents' Family Relationships
    Presented by: Melissa Y. Delgado, Sarah E. Killoren, Kimberly A. Updegraff
  • African American Families during the Economic Downturn
    Presented by: Barlynda M. Bryant, Chalandra M. Bryant

Abstract(s)

From Wall Street to Main Street to "El Callejon" (back ally): Economic and Educational Realities of Latino Immigrant Families in the Rural Midwest

Presented by: Robert Reyes, Ruben Viramontez Anguiano

In the Midwest, the north central region of Indiana has experienced dramatic demographic, social, and economic challenges. This study focuses on understanding how intersecting capitals (i.e., social, cultural and intercultural capital) at the familial, school and community levels impact the educational success of Latino students. In particular, we examine how these factors have been significantly affected by shifting economic realties in the region. Some of the economic challenges included: loss of jobs, limitations in meeting basic needs, housing instability as well as multiple families living in one household. These realities were often intensified by other social factors such as immigration.

You Moved Up, Did You Forget Us?: African American Intra-Familial Social Mobility

Presented by: Pearl Stewart, Gwendolyn Parker-Ames

This paper reports the results of a study that examined the effects of changing socioeconomic status on extended family interaction. The qualitative study combines the life course/kinscripts paradigm with ambiguous loss theory to explore the experiences of the members of one large (150+ members), extended African American family. The question that provided focus for this study was: does changing socioeconomic status influence an individual's interaction in the extended family system. The results suggest that interaction is maintained despite changes in socioeconomic status among family members but that the interaction is transformed as one rises in socioeconomic status.

Economic Hardship and Mexican American Adolescents' Family Relationships

Presented by: Melissa Y Delgado, Sarah E Killoren, Kimberly A Updegraff

The central goal of this study was to examine adolescents' perceptions of economic hardship as the mechanism through which mother and father economic hardship are related to parent-adolescent relationship quality (i.e., acceptance and conflict) in Mexican American two-parent families (N = 222). Using structural equation modeling (SEM) procedures, our findings indicated adolescents' perceptions of economic hardship mediate the link between parents' perceptions of economic hardship and parent-adolescent acceptance and conflict. Similar findings emerged in the separate models for mothers and fathers. These findings suggest that examining adolescents' perceptions of the family context is important among Mexican American adolescents.

African American Families during the Economic Downturn

Presented by: Barlynda M. Bryant, Chalandra M. Bryant

Job loss and decreases in income creates financial strain, which has been linked to depressive symptoms and consequently, marital conflict. Wives' work tends to be associated with marital problems, but the income wives are able to contribute to the their family household alleviates perceived economic strain, thereby improving some aspects of marital quality. African Americans experienced economic gains in the 1990's; however, our nation's current economic downturn hurt those who were already economically and socially marginalized. The present study explored what changes have occurred during two years of economic downturn to a diverse sample of newly wed African American couples.

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Conference Session