Adolescents and International Families

Concurrent Sessions 3

Presented by: Rosario Esteinou, Gary W. Peterson, Stephan M. Wilson, Kevin R. Bush, Hye-Jung Yun, Ming Cui, Vanja Lazarevic, Wei-Shiuan Jeng, Chin-Chun Sue. Presider/Discussant: Judith Myers-Walls

1:15 PM
2:30 PM
Location
Bowie C
Session #
136
Session Type
Paper
Session Focus
  • Research
Organized By
  • International

About the Session

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  • 136-1: Mexican Parent-Adolescent Relationships: Predicting Conformity to Parents
    Presented by: Rosario Esteinou, Gary W. Peterson, Stephan M. Wilson, Kevin R. Bush
  • 136-2: The Effects of Parental Warmth on Adolescent Delinquency: A Comparison of Adolescents in the United States and South Korea
    Presented by: Hye-Jung Yun, Ming Cui
  • 136-3: Relations Between Brokering Feelings and the Well-being of Immigrant Youth
    Presented by: Vanja Lazarevic
  • 136-4: Affiliation of Parental Ethnic Culture, Parent-adolescent Relation, and Well-being of Taiwan's Biethnic Adolescents
    Presented by: Wei-Shiuan Jeng, Chin-Chun Sue

Abstract(s)

Mexican Parent-Adolescent Relationships: Predicting Conformity to Parents

Presented by: Rosario Esteinou, Gary W. Peterson, Stephan M. Wilson, Kevin R. Bush

Several aspects of Mexican parent-adolescent relationship were tested as predictors of conformity to parents. 534 questionnaires were completed by students at six secondary schools in Hermosillo, Mexico. Results indicated that a greater sense of familism, parental monitoring, and the perception that parents have coercive authority serve to increase the conformity of adolescents to parents' expectations. However, distinctively different patterns were found between the influence of mothers and fathers and Mexican parents also place a strong emphasis on control strategies to instill adolescent conformity. Moderate support was provided that collectivistic socialization patterns play a key role within Mexican parent-adolescent relationships.

The Effects of Parental Warmth on Adolescent Delinquency: A Comparison of Adolescents in the United States and South Korea

Presented by: Hye-Jung Yun, Ming Cui

In this study, we examined the effects of parental warmth on adolescent delinquency in the U.S. and South Korea. Using nationally representative and longitudinal samples from both countries, we found that (1) delinquency levels were significantly lower in the South Korean adolescents than in the U.S. adolescents, (2) parental warmth was significantly and negatively associated with adolescent delinquency in both countries, and (3) the protective effect of parental warmth on adolescent delinquency was much stronger for U.S. adolescents than for South Korean adolescents. Effective programs on parenting could help reduce adolescent delinquency.

Relations Between Brokering Feelings and the Well-being of Immigrant Youth

Presented by: Vanja Lazarevic

Cultural brokering (i.e., interpreting, explaining the school system) is almost ubiquitous experience among immigrants, with over 90% of immigrant youth brokering for their parents. Cultural brokering has received a lot of attention in the past decade, but researchers have mainly focused on the frequency of brokering. This study contributes to previous literature by examining the effects of feelings about brokering on immigrant youth's (N = 197) well-being and family dynamics. Findings indicate that feeling negative about brokering can have adverse effects on youth's well-being, but feeling positive can enhance youth well-being and family dynamics. Implications of these findings are discussed.

Affiliation of Parental Ethnic Culture, Parent-adolescent Relation, and Well-being of Taiwan's Biethnic Adolescents

Presented by: Wei-Shiuan Jeng, Chin-Chun Sue

Taiwan children's mother with South East Asia background consisted 7.9% and 3% children born in 2004 to 2011 respectively. Taiwan places the high values on ethnic integration and cultural assimilation. The proposed study attempts to reveal association among the parent child relationship, affiliation to father/mother ethnic cultural and biethnic adolescents' well-being. Data for the analyses came from the Survey of Living Status of the Interracial Family Adolescents in Taiwan 2009. Well-being was defined as respondents' previous semester grade ranking, self esteem, and mental health (CESD). SEM will be used. Applications to policy and service programs will be discussed

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Conference Session