Relational Experiences, Identity, and Inclusion for GLBT Individuals and Families

Concurrent Sessions 2

Brad van Eeden-Moorefield, April Few-Demo, Kristen Benson, Shannon Lummer; Elizabeth Holman, Brian Ogolsky, Ramona Oswald; Kathryn Conrad, Spencer Olmstead; Joel A. Muraco, Stephen T. Russell, Melissa A. Curran, Emily A. Butler; Casey J. Totenhagen, Ashley K. Randall, Caroline B. Adams, Ashley Cooper, Dannele C. Ferreras, Morgan Howell, Kelsey J. Walsh

Introduction of Innovation Grant Winner: Brad vanEeden-Moorefield

Discussants: Kevin Zimmerman and Alan Acock (ADDED 11/12/2014)

Presider: Kevin Zimmerman (ADDED 11/12/2014)

10:00 AM
11:30 AM
Location
Key Ballroom 9
Session #
118
Session Type
Paper Session
Session Focus
Research
Organized By
Feminism & Family Studies
About the Session
  • Research on LGBT-Headed Families: A Content Analysis of Top Family Journals 2000-2013
    Presented by: Brad van Eeden-Moorefield, April Few-Demo, Kristen Benson, Shannon Lummer
  • Workplace Climate, Identity Salience, and Disclosure of an LGB Identity
    Presented by: Elizabeth Holman, Brian Ogolsky, Ramona Oswald
  • The Meaning and Process of Dating among Gay and Lesbian Emerging Adults
    Presented by: Kathryn Conrad, Spencer Olmstead
  • Minority Stress and Public Displays of Affection in Gay and Lesbian Couples
    Presented by: Joel A. Muraco, Stephen T. Russell, Melissa A. Curran, Emily A. Butler
  • (2013 NCFR INNOVATION GRANT WINNER) - It's OUTside Our Relationship: Effects of Outness on Stress in Same-sex Couples
    Presented by: Casey J. Totenhagen, Ashley K. Randall, Caroline B. Adams, Ashley Cooper, Dannele C. Ferreras, Morgan Howell, Kelsey J. Walsh
Abstract(s)

Research on LGBT-Headed Families: A Content Analysis of Top Family Journals 2000-2013

Presented by: Brad van Eeden-Moorefield, April Few-Demo, Kristen Benson, Shannon Lummer

The current study is a content analysis of research on LGBT family life appearing in top general family journals over the past 13 years: only 2.15% of published articles. Studies were almost equally quantitative and qualitative, and most samples were white and middle class. Unique LGBT variables (e.g., discrimination) were rarely studied. Given the lack of diversity and few published articles, our discipline is being outpaced. During the same time period a single top family health journal ranked in the same database as our sample published more LGBT-focused studies than our sample combined, and overwhelmingly included minority LGBT-headed families.

Workplace Climate, Identity Salience, and Disclosure of an LGB Identity

Presented by: Elizabeth Holman, Brian Ogolsky, Ramona Oswald

The aim of this study is to add to the growing body of literature exploring the relationship between the work environment and LGB individuals' decisions to disclose their sexual identity in the workplace. We also examined the role of identity salience as a moderating variable. Regression analysis of 400 LGB individuals indicated that increased support in the workplace and greater identity salience are related to increased disclosure to coworkers and supervisors. Additionally, hostility in the workplace had a greater impact on individuals with higher levels of identity salience compared to average or lower levels of identity salience.

The Meaning and Process of Dating among Gay and Lesbian Emerging Adults

Presented by: Kathryn Conrad, Spencer Olmstead

We used a modified version of grounded theory methods to analyze the meanings and experiences of dating for gay emerging adults attending college. Two themes emerged that detailed the meaning of dating as either analogous to commitment and monogamy or as a trialing period en route to a monogamous relationship. Their described experiences constructed the process of dating into four chronological phases: pre-dating, building a foundation, on the same page, and the step further. Instances of gender variability are documented within their processes of dating. Implications for the inclusion of sexual minorities in sexual and relationship health education are discussed.

Minority Stress and Public Displays of Affection in Gay and Lesbian Couples

Presented by: Joel A. Muraco, Stephen T. Russell, Melissa A. Curran, Emily A. Butler

Affectionate communication is associated with fewer depressive symptoms and better overall psychological health; however, most research on such communication has focused on heterosexuals. As gay and lesbian individuals often have to consider their safety and safety of their partner, public displays of affection (PDA), one element of affectionate communication, carries with it increased risk. This increased risk may supersede psychological health benefits. Using daily diaries we test competing hypotheses: 1) PDA results in increased well-being and 2) PDA results in increased minority stress. We find evidence for both. Implications will be discussed.

(2013 NCFR Innovation Grant Winner) - It's OUTside Our Relationship: Effects of Outness on Stress in Same-sex Couples

Presented by: Casey J. Totenhagen, Ashley K. Randall, Caroline B. Adams, Ashley Cooper, Dannele C. Ferreras, Morgan Howell, Kelsey J. Walsh

All couples experience common external stressors originating outside the relationship such as work stress. Same-sex couples may also experience gay-related stressors, such as harassment due to their sexual orientation. Using the Vulnerability-Stress-Adaptation model, we hypothesized that being more out (outness) would buffer stress. Preliminary analyses on a partial sample of same-sex couples in two sites (AZ = 22 couples; AL = 21 couples) suggests greater outness is associated with less common external stress, but only for couples in AZ. As predicted, greater outness was associated with less gay-related stress. Further analyses on daily variations and implications will be discussed.

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