Sexual Coercion, Sexual Abuse, and Relational Violence

Concurrent Sessions 6

Nicole Conroy, Ambika Krishnakumar, Janel Leone; Lee Ann De Reus; Megan Haselschwerdt, Elissa Mitchell, Jennifer Hardesty, Marcela Raffaelli; Kimmery Newsom, Karen Myers-Bowman; Kimberly Crossman
Presider: Jennifer Hardesty (ADDED 11/12/2014)

10:00 AM
11:15 AM
Location
Key Ballroom 9
Session #
219
Session Type
Paper
Session Focus
  • Research
Organized By
  • Feminism & Family Studies

About the Session

  • The Hidden Role of Social Coercion in Sexual Acquiescence
    Presented by: Nicole Conroy, Ambika Krishnakumar, Janel Leone
  • Mothers' Acceptance and Rejection of Children Born from Rape in the DR Congo
    Presented by: Lee Ann De Reus
  • Violence, Coercive Control and Help-Seeking Among Divorcing Mothers
    Presented by: Megan Haselschwerdt, Elissa Mitchell, Jennifer Hardesty, Marcela Raffaelli
  • Healthy Sexuality as a Context for Resilience in Women Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse
    Presented by: Kimmery Newsom, Karen Myers-Bowman
  • A Grounded Theory Analysis of Mothers' Experiences of Nonviolent Coercive Control in Marriage and After Separation
    Presented by: Kimberly Crossman, Winner of the 2013 Jessie Bernard Outstanding Research Proposal from a Feminist Perspective Award

Abstract(s)

The Hidden Role of Social Coercion in Sexual Acquiescence

Presented by: Nicole Conroy, Ambika Krishnakumar

This study advances the literature on sexual compliance, defined as willing participation in and consent to unwanted sexual activity in the absence of immediate partner pressure. Considering that covert forms of social coercion may pressure women into participating in unwanted sexual activity, the present study examines the role that gendered expectations play in women's experiences of compliance. Results suggest that relationship control and popular media predict women's sexual acquiescence. Reported reasons for sexual acquiescence included promoting partner pleasure and intimacy as well as avoiding arguments, all of which support the notion that social coercion may lead to women's sexual acquiescence.

Mothers' Acceptance and Rejection of Children Born from Rape in the DR Congo

Presented by: Lee Ann De Reus

The purpose of this qualitative project was to explore, via group interviews (n=24), why and how rape survivors in the Democratic Republic of the Congo accpet or reject their children born from sexualized violence. Results indicate that mothers were conflicted in their feelings towards their child. While most accepted their children, the interaction of stigma, poverty and trauma created great hardship and negatively shaped the parent-child relationship. Mothers internatlized the stigma, loved the child less than other children, and responded harshly to the child. Economic independence was identified as the solution to ending stigma. Practice and policy implications are addressed.

Violence, Coercive Control and Help-Seeking Among Divorcing Mothers

Presented by: Megan Haselschwerdt, Elissa Mitchell, Jennifer Hardesty, Marcela Raffaelli

Although research has consistently documented that women who experience intimate partner violence (IPV) use a variety of strategies to protect themselves and their children, there is no research to date that has examined how mothers in the process of divorce with different experiences of IPV differ in use of help-seeking strategies. Thus, this study examines mothers' help-seeking strategies during marriage and during divorce based on presence/absence of violence, and more specifically, the presence of coercive controlling (CCV) or situational couple violence (SCV). Preliminary findings report differences in use of help-seeking strategies depending on the time period and type of IPV.

Healthy Sexuality as a Context for Resilience in Women Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse

Presented by: Kimmery Newsom, Karen Myers-Bowman

The current study was conducted with women survivors of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) about their experiences of resilience in the context of interpersonal and sexually intimate relationships. Six women between the ages of 18 and 55, who self-identified as resilient on the pre-screening form, were invited to participate in the study. Qualitative methods with a phenomenological lens were employed. One-on-one interviews were conducted with participants. The results revealed the perspective and focus the survivors have regarding resilience and sexuality in interpersonal relationships.

A Grounded Theory Analysis of Mothers' Experiences of Nonviolent Coercive Control in Marriage and After Separation

Presented by: Kimberly Crossman, Winner of the 2013 Jessie Bernard Outstanding Research Proposal from a Feminist Perspective Award

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