2017 NCFR Annual Conference Session Listing

2017 Full Conference Schedule (PDF)

Below, find details about each session planned for the 2017 NCFR Annual Conference, Nov. 15-18 in Orlando, Florida. We have also created a series of sessions sorted by NCFR sections and interest areas.

Session pages will include presentation slides or handouts if the presenter(s) chose to make them available. 

Showing 1 - 3 of 3 Session(s)
Conference Session
Poster
Poster Symposium: Media Characters and Representations of Relationships Throughout the Lifecourse
8:00 AM
8:45 AM
Session #
405
Location
Grand Ballroom C

88 total posters in this session. Topics include Families in International Context; Immigrant Families; Refugees; Adolescence Therapy; Divorce; Technology and Therapy; plus five more topics.

Conference Session
Symposium
Concurrent Sessions 11

José-Michael González, Samantha K. Jones, Sarah Killoren, Gabrielle Kline, Edna C. Alfaro, Laura Mauldin, Mamta Saxena, Jenny Padilla, Xioran Sun, Michael E. Woolley; Discussant: Susan Marie McHale; Chair: José-Michael González

11:00 AM
12:15 PM
Session #
411
Location
Salon 13

This symposium extends emerging research on sibling relationships drawing from cross-disciplinary collaboration and the strengths-based approach to advance past scholarship that once pathologized and marginalized families of non-nuclear, nontraditional family configurations.

Conference Session
Symposium
Concurrent Sessions 11

Jaclyn A. Saltzman, Kelly K. Bost, Barbara H. Fiese, Angela Wiley, and the STRONG Kids Team , Megan H. Pesch, Alison L. Miller, Niko Kaciroti, Katherine Rosenblum, Julie C. Lumeng, Sheryl O. Hughes, Thomas G. Power, Susan L. Johnson, Louise Parker, Jane Lanigan, Ashley Beck, Drew Betz, AnaMaria Martinez; Discussant: Barbara Fiese; Chair: Kelly K. Bost

11:00 AM
12:15 PM
Session #
412
Location
Salon 11

This symposium aims to highlight mechanisms by which families influence children's weight and eating behaviors, and to examine whether prevention programs targeting modifiable, family-based risk factors can improve health outcomes, particularly for vulnerable children.