Advancing Family Science/Education and Enrichment Professional Development Resource Exchange and Roundtables

Leandra Parris, Renée Tobin, Ani Yazedjian , Norma J. Perez-Brena, Michelle Toews, Andrea Hutson, Mark Feinberg, Chelsea Garneau-Rosner, Carrie Lehman, Ashton Chapman, Emily Manning, Nate Stoddard, Victor W. Harris , Silvia Bartolic, Daniel Perlman, Ronald Bulanda, Anita Glee Bertram, Brandon Burr, Kaye Sears, LaDonna Atkins, Tawni Holmes, Melissa Powers, Kasey Wood, Julia Bernard, Meghan Dove, Johnnye Rogers, Michael O'Neal, Paul Fisher, Katy Gregg, Sherria D. Taylor, Margaret E. Machara, Kimberly Allen, I. Joyce Chang, Rebecca Ward, Kimmery Newsom, Lover Chancler, Keondria McClish, Yolanda Mitchell, Jackie Schwab, Robin Yaure, Pamela B. Payne, Naomi Brower, Grace Bingham, Catherine Dutton, Karen Blaisure, Crystal Duncan Lane, Bryce Dickey, David Knox, Lacey Bagley, Claire Kimberly, Maureen Blankemeyer, Kathleen Walker, Courtney Walsh, Tiah J. Wingate, Adrienne Edwards, Jenna Dewar, Jacki Fitzpatrick, Rhonda Buckley, Sterling Wall, Tumaki Aruanã da Silva Cassiano, Fernanda Ferreira de Morais Zanitti, Cristiana Mercadante Esper Berthoud, Judith Myers-Walls, Darin Knapp, Tami James Moore, Sylvia Asay

8:00 PM
9:30 PM
Location
Grand Ballroom E
Session #
166
Session Type
Resource Exchange
Session Focus
  • Research
  • Practice
Organized By
  • Advancing Family Science
  • Education & Enrichment

About the Session

  • 166-01 EE - Providing Healthy Relationship, Job Readiness, and Financial Literacy Curricula for AtRisk Youth: Lessons Learned
    By Leandra Parris, Renée Tobin, Ani Yazedjian
  • 166-02 EE - Adapting a Coparenting-focused Prevention Program to Serve Latino Adolescent Parents
    By Norma J. Perez-Brena, Michelle Toews, Andrea Hutson, Mark Feinberg
  • 166-03 EE - Implementing Relationship Education for Diverse Singles: Lessons Learned
    By Chelsea Garneau-Rosner, Carrie Lehman, Ashton Chapman, Emily Manning, Nate Stoddard
  • 166-04 EE - SMART Couples Florida: Lessons Learned in Implementing a Multi-million Dollar HMRF Grant
    By Victor W. Harris
  • 166-05 AFS - International, Cross-institution Undergraduate Student Videochat Diversity Assignment
    By Silvia Bartolic, Daniel Perlman
  • 166-06 AFS - Teaching the Science in Family Science Courses: Strategies and Techniques
    By Ronald Bulanda
  • 166-07 EE - Generations Learning Together: Multigenerational Center
    By Anita Glee Bertram, Brandon Burr, Kaye Sears, LaDonna Atkins, Tawni Holmes, Melissa Powers
  • 166-08 EE - Parenting a Companion Animal as a Precursor to Parenting a Human Child
    By Kasey Wood
  • 166-09 EE - Teaching Practitioners in Online Learner Formats
    By Julia Bernard
  • 166-10 EE - Parent-Centric Model: Building Trust to Educate and Empower Parents
    By Meghan Dove, Johnnye Rogers, Michael O'Neal, Paul Fisher, Katy Gregg
  • 166-11 EE - Defining the Boundaries of Family Life Coaching in the Field of Family Studies
    By Sherria D. Taylor
  • 166-12 EE - What can Family Life Coaching do for Families?
    By Margaret E. Machara
  • 166-13 EE - Teaching Coaching Skills in Family Science
    By Kimberly Allen
  • 166-14 AFS - Disney Princess Going to College: Using Disney Princess Films as Catalyst for Discussion
    By I. Joyce Chang, Rebecca Ward
  • 166-15 AFS - Developing a Tool for Assessing Diversity Education in Family Science Programs
    By Kimmery Newsom, Lover Chancler, Keondria McClish, Yolanda Mitchell, Jackie Schwab, Robin Yaure
  • 166-16 EE - Outcomes of a Multi-year Multi-county Marriage Celebration
    By Pamela B. Payne, Naomi Brower, Grace Bingham
  • 166-17 EE - Student Created Short Videos to Teach Developmental Concepts & Theories
    By Catherine Dutton
  • 166-18 EE - Undergraduate and Graduate FLE Methodology Courses
    By Karen Blaisure, Crystal Duncan Lane, Bryce Dickey
  • 166-19 EE - So You Want to Write a Marriage and Family Textbook?: Look Before You Leap
    By David Knox
  • 166-20 EE - Technology Use and Its Association With Romantic Relationships
    By Lacey Bagley, Claire Kimberly
  • 166-21 AFS - Faculty as Catalysts: Internationalizing a Family Science Curriculum
    By Maureen Blankemeyer, Kathleen Walker, Courtney Walsh, Tiah J. Wingate
  • 166-22 AFS - Strategies for Bridging Macro- and Microsystemic Approaches to Teaching about Family Risk and Resilience: Tips for Early Career Faculty
    By Adrienne Edwards, Jenna Dewar
  • 166-23 AFS - Relevance of Kram’s mentorship functions to faculty-student relationships
    By Jacki Fitzpatrick
  • 166-24 EE - Preparing Students for Success in Family Science Programs and Professions
    By Catherine Dutton, Rhonda Buckley, Sterling Wall
  • 166-25 EE - A Training Process Impact: A Case Study With Brazilian Low-income Mothers
    By Tumaki Aruanã da Silva Cassiano, Fernanda Ferreira de Morais Zanitti, Cristiana Mercadante Esper Berthoud
  • 166-26 EE - Tailoring Family Life Education for Distance Learning
    By Judith Myers-Walls
  • 166-27 EE - “It Wasn’t Just Another Research Paper”: Students Writing Fiction to Learn
    By Darin Knapp
  • 166-28 EE - Experiential Learning: Application Through Case Assignments
    By Tami James Moore, Sylvia Asay

Abstract(s)

Providing Healthy Relationship, Job Readiness, and Financial Literacy Curricula for AtRisk Youth: Lessons Learned

By Leandra Parris, Renée Tobin, Ani Yazedjian

The four papers each highlight a federally funded relationship education program that seeks to strengthen individuals and couples' relationship skills. These programs work with a wide range of individuals and deliver their services in unique ways in a variety of settings. The purpose of this symposium is to highlight the lessons learned from each of these sites with the goal of providing attendees with suggestions for utilizing evidence-based practices to provide effective relationship education at any scale.

Objectives

1. To highlight best practices in providing relationship education to diverse populations. 2. To address challenges experienced by relationship education programs. 3. To discuss strategies for adapting relationship education curricula to diverse populations.

Adapting a Coparenting-focused Prevention Program to Serve Latino Adolescent Parents

By Norma J. Perez-Brena, Michelle Toews, Andrea Hutson, Mark Feinberg

Implementing Relationship Education for Diverse Singles: Lessons Learned

By Chelsea Garneau-Rosner, Carrie Lehman, Ashton Chapman, Emily Manning, Nate Stoddard

SMART Couples Florida: Lessons Learned in Implementing a Multi-million Dollar HMRF Grant

By Victor W. Harris

International, Cross-institution Undergraduate Student Videochat Diversity Assignment

By Silvia Bartolic, Daniel Perlman

Canadian and U.S. students created a brochure indicating key features of healthy relationships in their culture, exchanged their brochures and video chatted for approximately an hour. Afterward they wrote reflections on their experience and did a short survey. In this presentation we will describe the assignment, articulate the learning principles on which it was based, specify learning objectives and report survey data collected to evaluate the assignment's success. Students rated the assignment overall as better than average, with over 80% of students feeling it made them more aware of their own culture and increased their interest in another culture.

Objectives

1. To design and demonstrate the feasibility of students in a close relationships course interacting with similar students studying in another country as part of an assignment. 2. To evaluate students’ performance vis-à-vis the assignment’s learning objectives via student self-report and work samples. 3. To assess student-reported changes in their interest in the other country as a result of the assignment.

Teaching the Science in Family Science Courses: Strategies and Techniques

By Ronald Bulanda

Utilizing various exercises which require reading, interpreting, and assessing family scholarship, I aim to promote greater quantitative and scientific literacy in students. These literacies foster greater critical thinking skills, where students have a more thorough comprehension of how and why families advance the lives of both children and adults. In successfully completing the exercises, students demonstrate greater awareness of the roles famlies play in promoting and maintaining the life chances and well being of its members.

Objectives

To introduce examples of exercises which promote quantitative and research literacy. To identify and outline how quantitative and research literacy promotes a greater understanding of family relations and functions. To demonstrate evidence of student success utilizing the course exercises.

Generations Learning Together: Multigenerational Center

By Anita Glee Bertram, Brandon Burr, Kaye Sears, LaDonna Atkins, Tawni Holmes, Melissa Powers

Generations need to spend time in meaningful activities to facilitate more healthy interactions. An interdisciplinary team worked together to implement an intergenerational project with 4 year olds, college students, and senior adults. College students played an active role in planning/facilitating activities. The overall objective of the research was assessing perceptional change between the generations using pre/posttests with college students, pre-post interviews with older adults, and pre-post teacher led discussions with children. Findings suggest that senior adults and college students had improved perceptions. Children's perceptions remained negative with some positive perceptions.

Objectives

1) To evaluate the effectiveness of an intergenerational program 2) To assess perceptional change between older adults, college age students, and children in an intergenerational program. 3) To discover if an intergenerational project would change perceptions of college students towards working with older adults in future work related positions.

Parenting a Companion Animal as a Precursor to Parenting a Human Child

By Kasey Wood

     

Objectives

1. To identify key considerations as couples consider prior to "parenting" companion animals 2. To provide information for parent education programs when couples make the decision to "parent" a companion animal 3. To develop a conceptual theoretical framework corresponding to the lives of companion animals.

Teaching Practitioners in Online Learner Formats

By Julia Bernard

Practitioner pedagogy can be difficult to manage online. We are teaching professionals to practice without face to face contact. In some cases, technology is available to interact with our students, but it is not the only way of broadening their skills. Teaching family life education and human services using electronic learning formats must incorporate interaction with the student's community. Strategies for engaging students and making them competent professionals will be addressed.

Objectives

By the end of the presentation attendees will: 1. outline at least three necessary components of a skills based online class. 2. evaluate and discuss barriers to online learning of skills. 3. describe three ways to incorporate practitioner skills into their online course.

Parent-Centric Model: Building Trust to Educate and Empower Parents

By Meghan Dove, Johnnye Rogers, Michael O'Neal, Paul Fisher, Katy Gregg

By focusing on building trust and rapport, this first-of-its-kind model parent education program has empowered families and impacting change for the whole community. This unique program began with a desire of local civic leaders to break the cycle of poverty and to enrich the lives of the youngest citizens. The key piece of this program is using parents in planning and implementation that stems from building relationships. During this presentation we will present the history of the program, the methods of empowering the participants, and our next steps to further research the program and disseminate information for potential replication.

Objectives

1. Discuss the history and model of the program that makes it a first-of-its-kind 2. Review how the program has maintained the focus of ensuring parents have a voice throughout the planning process 3. Demonstrate the efforts to facilitate replication

Defining the Boundaries of Family Life Coaching in the Field of Family Studies

By Sherria D. Taylor

Family Life Coaching is unique but related to other Social Sciences. Defining the Boundaries of Family Life Coaching in the Field of Family Studies identifies both its uniqueness and connection with other areas of Family Studies.  What can Family Life Coaching do for Families looks at research on the impact of coaching within the family sciences. Teaching Coaching Skills in Family Science, is a hands-on look at how coaching techniques meld with Family Science.  As a rapidly growing area, a better understanding of Family Life Coaching and what it can add to the social sciences is needed.

Objectives

To identify similarities and differences between FLC and other social science areas. To evaluate effectiveness of coaching used in Family Sciences. To demonstrate coaching techniques within education and practice of Family Science.

What can Family Life Coaching do for Families?

By Margaret E. Machara

Teaching Coaching Skills in Family Science

By Kimberly Allen

Disney Princess Going to College: Using Disney Princess Films as Catalyst for Discussion

By I. Joyce Chang, Rebecca Ward

Disney’s animated media and movies have impacted children around the world. The Disney princess line was created in 2001 to target young girls. Although Disney princesses have been strongly critiqued by feminist scholars, scant attention has been paid to family relations and dynamics in the films.  This presentation will provide basic information about the most popular Disney princess films and discuss ways to utilize Disney films to highlight key family science theories and concepts.

Objectives

• To identify notable family dynamics depicted in popular Disney animated films. • To list three ways to incorporate Disney animated films in teaching family science classes. • To analyze common biases and issues in Disney animated films.

Developing a Tool for Assessing Diversity Education in Family Science Programs

By Kimmery Newsom, Lover Chancler, Keondria McClish, Yolanda Mitchell, Jackie Schwab, Robin Yaure

  There is a growing consensus on the importance of diversity education. The growing climate of fear, animosity, and exclusion of individuals and groups of people is often rooted in a lack of understanding and knowledge. Although there has been a movement to educate students on value differences and commonalities, there is not a common tool to measure the effectiveness of such efforts. The goal of this forum is to create such a tool that can be utilized by those in the field of family studies. Having a common tool will add reliability to research in this area.

Objectives

(1) To evaluate the effectiveness of the delivery of diversity education in family science undergraduate programs. (2) To analyze the retention of diversity education for students in family science undergraduate programs across the nation. (3) To demonstrate the necessity for the development of a common evaluation tool for measuring effectiveness of diversity education across family science undergraduate programs.

Outcomes of a Multi-year Multi-county Marriage Celebration

By Pamela B. Payne, Naomi Brower, Grace Bingham

Since the 1950's relationship education has been increasing in the United States resulting in the increases in relationship education programs (Cowan, Cowan and Knox, 2010; Cowan and Cowan, 2014). The Weber County Marriage Coalition hosts an annual event in conjunction with Utah State University Cooperative Extension that is well known and attended as a "date night" enrichment event. The primary goal of this project is to determine if the Northern Utah Marriage Celebration event influences participant knowledge and how. We explored differences based on year of attendance (2015 or 2016), age and sex differences in the knowledge obtained from participation.

Objectives

1) Participants will understand how a marriage celebration event can impact participants perceived relationship knowledge. 2) We will explore how knowledge changed from prior to the event to following the event for individuals who participated in the marriage celebration. 3) We will examine and explain difference in participant knowledge gains through understanding differences in outcomes by year of participation, age and sex of participants.

Student Created Short Videos to Teach Developmental Concepts & Theories

By Catherine Dutton

  Rather than another research paper, consider assigning students a video project in which they present a concept in video format. Video adds a layer of visual explanation to the concepts and requires both research on the student’s part and thoughtful creation of both concepts and presentation.   Student videos are found to require a higher level of preparation than a regular class presentation making them a rigorous addition to any course.

Objectives

Explain a successful implementation of a short-video assignment in family focused classes. Examine the benefits of student generated videos Discuss with participants how to apply this practice in their setting.

Undergraduate and Graduate FLE Methodology Courses

By Karen Blaisure, Crystal Duncan Lane, Bryce Dickey

The scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) offers a pathway to examine and guide improvements in teaching. In this Resource Exchange, we will address the SoTL focus of “what is” by sharing one family science program’s approaches to teaching undergraduate and graduate courses in FLE methodology.  We will describe assignments, teaching strategies, lessons learned and implemented, and report on initial efforts to document outcomes.

Objectives

Describe multiple techniques for teaching FLE methodology Compare assignments and teaching strategies used in undergraduate and graduate FLE methodology courses Determine assignments and teaching strategies useful for participants’ own FLE methodology course.

So You Want to Write a Marriage and Family Textbook?: Look Before You Leap

By David Knox

This paper identifies the characteristics of the person most suited for textbook development, the process of developing a proposal for a publisher and the outcomes of publishing a textbook for the author.  The academic should teach the course for which the textbook is being written, be able (for the first edition) to allocate 20 hours a week for three years and not be concerned about getting tenure or making money.  The positives and negatives of co-authorship as well as the outcomes for publishing a text for the individual are identified.

Objectives

1. To identify the one perspective one must adopt if one is to be a successful textbook author. 2. To identify the personal temperament best suited for textbook writing as well as the status of one’s professional development (is now the right time?) 3. To know how to develop and present a proposal for a publisher to evaluate/issue a contract.

Technology Use and Its Association With Romantic Relationships

By Lacey Bagley, Claire Kimberly

This study explored the associations between the use of technology and romantic relationships among 171 young adults. Participants completed a self-administered anonymous, online survey that included 66 questions assessing demographics, use of technology, sexting activity, and sexual behaviors. We found that with ethnicity and the internet's impact on casual acquaintances, Caucasians were much more likely to state the internet increased this relationship while African Americans said it decreased it. We also found that men were more likely to use technology to maintain long-distance relationships, as well as search for a partner, flirt, and ask a partner out online.

Objectives

(1) To provide information for relational helpers on current internet trends and relationship literature. (2) To measure outcomes from a quantitative study on internet use and relationships. (3) To discuss ways relationship helpers can use information gained from this study for work with future clients.

Faculty as Catalysts: Internationalizing a Family Science Curriculum

By Maureen Blankemeyer, Kathleen Walker, Courtney Walsh, Tiah J. Wingate

To meet changing demographic trends in contemporary US society and more adequately prepare students to be interculturally competent professionals, faculty from a university family science program internationalized their curriculum. Steps taken toward this end were addressed, including internationally-oriented faculty professional development trainings, guest speakers, in-class assignments, readings, panels, etc. Faculty intercultural competence was assessed at Years 1 and 4 of the curriculum internationalization process. Course syllabi were analyzed to determine if changes were evident from Year 1 to 4 in the extent of international content present in the courses.

Objectives

1. To provide examples of out-of-class steps taken to internationalize a family science curriculum. 2. To describe the role of professional development for faculty internationalizing a curriculum. 3. To describe suggestions for in-class integration of intercultural content.

Strategies for Bridging Macro- and Microsystemic Approaches to Teaching about Family Risk and Resilience: Tips for Early Career Faculty

By Adrienne Edwards, Jenna Dewar

  As early career instructors, we share insights from our divergent experiences in designing and teaching special topics courses on family risk and resilience: one from a macrosystemic perspective that involves integrating family theories with clinical approaches and one from a microsystemic perspective that entails linking individual causes of obesity with larger familial and environmental influences. In both approaches, family-level intervention and prevention strategies that promote family resilience are discussed from a strengths-based perspective. In this roundtable presentation, we bridge both teaching approaches and provide attendees with strategies, class activities, and sample syllabi on how to teach from each perspective.  

Objectives

To learn effective strategies for teaching about family risk and resilience To learn how to design a course syllabus for courses with a family risk and resilience focus To learn how to address potential challenges in teaching about family risk and resilience

Relevance of Kram’s mentorship functions to faculty-student relationships

By Jacki Fitzpatrick

The purpose of this session is to address potential linkages between (a) faculty-student working relationships and (b) Kram's (1983; Ragins & Kram, 2007) mentorship career and psychosocial functions. These functions emphasize the ways in which mentors can contribute to the professional and/or personal development of students/protégés. Implications for mentoring relationship parameters and processes (e.g., function-specific teams, peer mentors, cultural context) will be addressed. In addition, this presentation will address the relevance of mentorship content competence to research and clinical/educational service provision.

Objectives

Attendees will gain information about Kram’s mentorship functions. Attendees will gain information about the relevance of functions to faculty-student interactions. Attendees will gain information about relevance to professional skill content competence (e.g., coaching, intergenerational family dynamics).

Preparing Students for Success in Family Science Programs and Professions

By Catherine Dutton, Rhonda Buckley, Sterling Wall

Two universities discuss both formal and informal approaches to ensure student success through mentoring and building professionals. Examples include a focus on peer interaction, building a sense of connection and community, networking, participation and leadership in professional organizations.

Objectives

To discuss examples of best practices in student professional development. Discuss methods to facilitate student socialization and faculty mentoring at both graduate and undergraduate levels. To encourage participants to apply principles and practices to their own situational contexts.

A Training Process Impact: A Case Study With Brazilian Low-income Mothers

By Tumaki Aruanã da Silva Cassiano, Fernanda Ferreira de Morais Zanitti, Cristiana Mercadante Esper Berthoud

This paper reports a study conducted with Brazilian low-income mothers volunteers in an intervention program to examine, through a qualitative study, whether the training process changed their lives. The primary goal is to analyze the empowerment impact that the evidence-based Program FAST (Families and Schools Together) training brings to those team members. The research will start with in-depth interviews from March to June, followed by focus group from July to August. Results can help to improve the FAST training and to enlighten the importance of this process in building stronger communities around the schools, by empowering volunteers and target families.

Objectives

1) how being part of a team composed by school personnel and liberal professionals of the community affect and empower those mothers; 2) how the techniques learned during the training can change their own families and, consequentially, change them and; 3) how the role of a person who empowers families impacts them when they realize the success of their work.

Tailoring Family Life Education for Distance Learning

By Judith Myers-Walls

The educator is very important to effective all FLE, but the role requires specific applications of those skills when the education is from a distance. As online and digital education becomes more common and increasing preferred by families, it is important for educators to adapt their skills to a distance setting. This session will explore how to do that and how to help families discern high quality distance FLE and differentiate it from "fake education."

Objectives

As a result of attending this session, participants will be able to: • Outline some of the characteristics of the current FLE online setting. • Demonstrate several strategies for adapting key FLE educational skills to a distance-education environment. • Describe at least 5 characteristics of high quality distance FLE.

“It Wasn’t Just Another Research Paper”: Students Writing Fiction to Learn

By Darin Knapp

Students in an undergraduate family studies class were assigned to write fictionalized case studies incorporating course content into their writing as an assessment of their knowledge instead of writing a traditional, summative research paper to demonstrate competency. Evaluation of student feedback specific to this assignment was overwhelmingly positive, with 100% of participating students reporting that it was an effective assignment for learning content and 92% reporting that the assignment should be included in future versions of the course. Qualitative data yielded detailed, positive feedback about effective student learning as well as some constructive criticism about future versions of this assignment.

Objectives

To provide educators with an option for a creative application assignment. To teach about the application of a backward course design model. To illustrate how student feedback is used to adapt course materials and assignments.

Experiential Learning: Application Through Case Assignments

By Tami James Moore, Sylvia Asay

Using Case Studies in Family Resource Management was found to have a positive impact on student ability to apply concepts and to integrate theory into their work.  Student evaluations revealed an increased insight and application of theory to family and consumer behavior.  Students were assigned imaginary “family” units and worked through 10 consumer scenarios using the information provided about that family’s resources.  Periodically, students met within a “community” of other students representing four very different case families.  Students reflected that the case experiences enhanced their understanding of course concepts and their abilities to apply multiple family theories to situations.

Objectives

Participants will:  Understand how case studies provide experiential learning opportunities for students as required by many colleges and university programs.  Actively engage in the Case Family and Case Study approach during the workshop to more fully understand the process and outcomes.  Receive the Casebook and teaching notes for use in their courses.

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