Adversity and Trauma in Family Systems and the Community

Concurrent Sessions 10

Karina Shreffler, Stacy Tiemeyer, Ronald Cox, Jeremiah Grissett, Heather Love, Chelsey Torgerson, Antionette McFarlane, Elif Dede Yildirim, Jaipaul Roopnarine; Facilitator: Karina Shreffler

4:30 PM
5:45 PM
Location
Salon 16
Session #
343
Session Type
Paper
Session Focus
  • Research
Organized By
  • Families & Health

About the Session

  • 343-01 - Childhood Adversity and Attitudes Towards Having a Baby in Adolescence
    By Karina Shreffler, Stacy Tiemeyer, Ronald Cox, Jeremiah Grissett
  • 343-02 - PTSD Clusters, Substance Use, and Childhood Trauma
    By Heather Love, Chelsey Torgerson
  • 343-03 - Snapshot of a Narrative: The Promotion of a Feminist Narrative on State Domestic Violence Coalition Websites
    By Antionette McFarlane
  • 343-04 - The Associations between Economic Hardship, Depressive Symptoms, and Children’s Internalizing and Externalizing Behavior via Paternal and Maternal Parenting
    By Elif Dede Yildirim, Jaipaul Roopnarine

Facilitator: Karina Shreffler

Abstract(s)

Childhood Adversity and Attitudes Towards Having a Baby in Adolescence

By Karina Shreffler, Stacy Tiemeyer, Ronald Cox, Jeremiah Grissett

Exposure to adverse childhood experiences (ACEs; e.g., emotional, physical, or sexual abuse; exposure to domestic violence; substance abusing, mentally ill, or criminal household member; or separated/divorced parent) has been identified as a strong predictor of many biopsychosocial outcomes, including unintended and adolescent pregnancy risk. The mechanisms explaining the relationship between ACES and adolescent pregnancies are unclear, however. Using ordinal regression techniques on a sample of 501 adolescents from an urban Midwestern school district, we determine that increases in exposure to adverse childhood experiences are associated with more positive attitudes towards having a baby.

Objectives

Attendees will learn about adverse childhood experiences. Attendees will learn about mechanisms linking pregnancy attitudes and behaviors. Attendees will learn about the association between childhood adversity and pregnancy attitudes.

PTSD Clusters, Substance Use, and Childhood Trauma

By Heather Love, Chelsey Torgerson

The majority of adults in the U.S. report exposure to at least one traumatic event during childhood. The self-medication hypothesis indicates that substance use is a response to overwhelming emotions, such as PTSD from trauma exposure. This study examined age of first childhood trauma exposure, four PTSD clusters (re-experiencing, reactivity, avoidance, and negative thoughts), and substance use in an adult population (n = 654). Results indicated that nearly every PTSD cluster was associated childhood trauma exposure, while reactivity was the only PTSD cluster significantly associated with current alcohol and illicit drug use. Clinical implications are provided.

Objectives

1. To analyze the association between childhood trauma and four PTSD clusters. 2. To evaluate the association between PTSD clusters and substance use (alcohol and illicit drugs) in adulthood. 3. To provide clinical implications regarding substance use in relation to childhood trauma exposure.

Snapshot of a Narrative: The Promotion of a Feminist Narrative on State Domestic Violence Coalition Websites

By Antionette McFarlane

Domestic violence (DV) continues to affect many communities.  As a result, state domestic violence coalitions websites have emerged as a powerful resource in providing education and assistance to victims, practitioners, and the public. Using qualitative analysis, this study examines how DV is discussed on these websites. Specifically, this study explores how state domestic violence coalition websites frame the discussion of DV, particularly focusing on how DV is defined. Study findings provide insight into how DV is understood and implications of these findings are discussed with a specific goal of strengthening DV education resources provided on these websites.

Objectives

To examine how domestic violence is discussed on state domestic violence coalition websites To examine how domestic violence is defined on state domestic violence coalition websites To understand the importance of how domestic violence is framed

The Associations between Economic Hardship, Depressive Symptoms, and Children’s Internalizing and Externalizing Behavior via Paternal and Maternal Parenting

By Elif Dede Yildirim, Jaipaul Roopnarine

Guided by family stress theory (Conger et al., 1992), bio-ecological systems model(Bronfenbrenner, 1995), interpersonal acceptance-rejection theory (Rohner & Khaleque, 2005), and using Actor-Partner Interdependence Model we examined the associations between economic hardship, paternal and maternal depressive symptoms and children internalizing and externalizing behavior indirectly through paternal and maternal responsiveness and hostility across the Building Strong Families program and control groups. Maternal depressive symptoms were directly associated with children's internalizing and externalizing behaviors. Maternal depressive symptoms were  indirectly associated with children's internalizing behavior via maternal responsiveness. Paternal depressive symptoms were indirectly associated with children's internalizing and externalizing behaviors via maternal responsiveness.

Objectives

to assess (1) the direct associations between economic hardship, maternal and paternal depressive symptoms, and children’s internalizing and externalizing behaviors, 2) indirect associations betweenbetween economic hardship, maternal and paternal depressive symptoms, and children’s internalizing and externalizing behaviors via maternal and paternal responsiveness and hostile parenting, and (2) the role of BSF program participation on the associations between economic hardship, depressive symptoms and children’s internalizing and externalizing behaviors via parental responsiveness and hostility

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Conference Session