Biopsychosocial Approaches to Family Systems Issues

Lightning Paper Session

Michael Wells, Malin Bergström, Elise Radina, Mary Martin, Lindsay Clark, Lauren Ramsey, Alyssa Oddo, Meghan Day, Danielle Jones, Kristie Cordeiro, Veronica Kuhn, Briana Anderson, Amber Seidel, Chelom Leavitt, Kami Dvorakova, Sukhdeep Gill, Bryan Cafferky, Annie Johansson, Seonhwa Lee, Kandauda (KAS) Wickrama; Facilitator: Amber Seidel

12:00 PM
1:15 PM
Location
Salon 2
Session #
221
Session Type
Lightning Paper
Session Focus
  • Research
  • Practice
Organized By
  • Families & Health

About the Session

  • 221-01 - Comparing Swedish child health nurses’ attitudes and support to parents in 2004 and 2014
  • By Michael Wells, Malin Bergström
  • 221-02 - Parents Raising Children With Primary Lymphedema: Preliminary Study Results
    By Elise Radina, Mary Martin, Lindsay Clark, Lauren Ramsey, Alyssa Oddo, Meghan Day, Danielle Jones, Kristie Cordeiro
  • 221-03 - Evolving Needs of Fragile Families in Accessing Healthcare: A BPSS Model
    By Veronica Kuhn
  • 221-04 - Do Times Change?: Buffering Effects of Mindfulness for Younger and Older Adults
    By Briana Anderson, Amber Seidel, Chelom Leavitt, Kami Dvorakova, Sukhdeep Gill
  • 221-05 - Health and Physical Disability Risk Markers for Elder Maltreatment: A Meta-analysis
    By Bryan Cafferky, Annie Johansson
  • 221-06 - Hostile Marital Interactions and Physical Health: The Biopsychosocial Model
    By Seonhwa Lee, Kandauda (KAS) Wickrama

Facilitator: Amber Seidel

Abstract(s)

 

Comparing Swedish child health nurses’ attitudes and support to parents in 2004 and 2014

By Michael Wells, Malin Bergström

The current study aims to see if Swedish nurses’ attitudes have become more egalitarian since 2004, and if they provide equal support to mothers and fathers. In total, 363 nurses completed a 23-item questionnaire on their attitudes toward fathers as carers of infants, as well as the extent to which they discussed parenthood and provided supportive counseling to mothers and fathers, respectively. Nurses had more egalitarian attitudes in 2014 than in 2004, but still discussed parenthood and provided supportive counseling to mothers more than fathers. Gender inequities may partially explain why mothers are more involved in children’s health care.

Objectives

To evaluate child health nurses' gender differences of parenting support given to mothers and fathers, respectively. To evaluate if child health nurses' attitudes to fathers as carers of infants has changed between 2004 and 2014 To see the extent to which nurses feel comfortable seeing and supporting fathers compared to mothers.

Parents Raising Children With Primary Lymphedema: Preliminary Study Results

By Elise Radina, Mary Martin, Lindsay Clark, Lauren Ramsey, Alyssa Oddo, Meghan Day, Danielle Jones, Kristie Cordeiro

This mixed-methodology study of the lived experiences of parents raising children with primary lymphedema included survey measures (i.e., symptoms, activities of daily living, and both child and parent psychological distress) and semi-structured interviews (i.e., parental challenges, advocacy for child, and support and coping mechanisms). Most parents reported that their child’s regular social, leisure activities, and interactions with other children were affected. Analysis of interviews revealed four themes: 1) frustration over misdiagnosis, 2) need for social support, 3) financial and insurance struggles, and 3) difficulty finding and keeping pediatric lymphedema therapists.

Objectives

To explain what primary lymphedema is and how it can impact quality of life. To describe the major struggles parents of children with lymphedema experience. To identify implications for policy and practice related to patients with primary lymphedema and their families

Evolving Needs of Fragile Families in Accessing Healthcare: A BPSS Model

By Veronica Kuhn

The BPSS model considers biological psychological, social and spiritual factors that impact family health experiences and, can be useful in understanding healthcare utilization (HU). Few studies test or validate the full conceptual BPSS model and none consider its relationship to HU behaviors. Using data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, we tests a longitudinal model of BPSS and their relationship to HU (n=2845). Results support the tenants of the BPSS. Findings provide further evidence to support the inclusion of mental health, and family level of involvement in biomedical health.

Objectives

1)To longitudinally evaluate the the role of Biopsychosocial-Spiritual factors as they relate to healthcare utilization 2)To understand how Biopsychosocial-Spiritual Factors at the couple level influence health care utilization behaviors. 3) To analyze Health care utilization of marginalized populations through to the use of longitudinal and dyadic mythologies.

Do Times Change?: Buffering Effects of Mindfulness for Younger and Older Adults

By Briana Anderson, Amber Seidel, Chelom Leavitt, Kami Dvorakova, Sukhdeep Gill

Nearly 45% of adults report more stress in their lives than five years ago. This study examined whether dispositional mindfulness buffers the deleterious effects stress has on psychological well-being. Findings from younger and older adult samples suggest for those with lower dispositional Hostile Marital Interactions and Physical Health: The Biopsychosocial Modelmindfulness, stress was associated with greater depressive symptoms. For those with higher dispositional mindfulness, stress was associated with less depressive symptoms. Interestingly, the association was stronger for older adults; however, depressive symptoms were higher for younger adults. Our findings have implications not only for health-related research with families but also for providers working with individuals struggling with depression.

Objectives

1) To analyze dispositional mindfulness as a possible buffer of stress and depression. 2) To compare how dispositional mindfulness, stress, and depression differ for older and younger adults. 3) To better understand mental health across the life course.

Health and Physical Disability Risk Markers for Elder Maltreatment: A Meta-analysis

By Bryan Cafferky, Annie Johansson

Elder maltreatment poses a significant public health problem worldwide. This is the first published meta-analysis to analyze health, illness, and physical disability risk markers associated with elder maltreatment. Significant results were found for elder maltreatment and chronic illnesses/conditions (r=.15, k = 27, p < .001), ADL/IADLs (r=.05, k = 48, p < .001), and for physical disabilities (r=.14, k = 28, p < .05). Results from this meta-analytic study can help inform future work and research regarding health, illness, and physical disability risk markers for elder maltreatment.

Objectives

By the end of this presentation attendees will be able to: 1. Articulate which health, illness, and physical disability related risk markers are significantly related to elder maltreatment. 2. Identify which of these health, illness, and physical disability risk markers are most strongly related to elder maltreatment. 3. Apply this knowledge to inform interventions to better prevent and identify elder maltreatment.

Hostile Marital Interactions and Physical Health: The Biopsychosocial Model

By Seonhwa Lee and Kandauda (K.A.S.) Wickrama

Using a sample of 370 couples during a 10-year period, this study attempted to quantify "biopsychosocial" links between marital hostility and physical health. Consistent with the biopsychosocial model, the results confirm the detrimental effects of husbands' and wives' hostile marital processes on their physical health outcomes over midlife years through physiological, psychological, and Behavioral mechanisms. This implies that chronic marital distress can impair normal physiological processes contributing to long-term physical health problems. Appropriate interventions need to be developed for couples with high marital distress to break ongoing cycles of hostile interactions and to improve healthy lifestyles for better health outcomes.

Objectives

To examine the chronic effects of hostile marital interactions between husbands and wives on physical health through physiological, psychological, and Behavioral mechanisms. To investigate how couples’ hostile marital interactions affect not only their own (actor effect) physical health but also that of their marital partners (partner effect).

 

 

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