Changes in the Family System: Parent Absence and Blended Families

Concurrent Sessions 5

Mellissa Gordon, Raymond Petren, Chelsea Garneau-Rosner, Jaimee Hartenstein, Mindy Markham, Kali Summers, Anthony Ferraro, Karen Oehme, Mallory Lucier-Greer; Facilitator: Emily Gaillard

8:30 AM
9:45 AM
Location
Salon 13
Session #
209
Session Type
Paper
Session Focus
  • Research
Organized By
  • Education & Enrichment

About the Session

  • 209-01 - Long-term effects of parental incarceration on young adults’ achievement
    By Mellissa Gordon
  • 209-02 - Relationship Stability Among Mothers of Young Children and New Partners
    By Raymond Petren, Chelsea Garneau-Rosner
  • 209-03 - Parental Custody Arrangement Decision Making Model
    By Jaimee Hartenstein, Mindy Markham, Kali Summers
  • 209-04 - Co-parenting After Divorce: Perceived Competence as a Coping Mechanism
    By Anthony Ferraro, Karen Oehme, Mallory Lucier-Greer

Facilitator: Emily Gaillard

Abstract(s)

Long-term effects of parental incarceration on young adults’ achievement

By Mellissa Gordon

Children of incarcerated parents face multiple challenges, and are at an increased risk of experiencing cumulative negative effects. These include peer stigmatization and lower academic achievement. Less is known however, about the long-term impact of parental incarceration once children have entered young adulthood. Parents' far-reaching impact has been implicated in numerous studies addressing young adult outcomes, suggesting that, the ways in which parent-child relationships are encouraged, supported, and nurtured around difficult circumstances can have meaningful implications on young adults. Findings suggested that quality parent-child relationships can help to mitigate the harmful effects of parental incarceration on young adults' educational attainment.

Objectives

1) To extend the literature on the impact of parental incarceration in young adulthood. 2) To describe the underlying processes of parental incarceration and young adults educational attainment. 3) To identify the usefulness of specific parent-child processes on parental incarceration and young adults educational attainment.

Relationship Stability Among Mothers of Young Children and New Partners

By Raymond Petren, Chelsea Garneau-Rosner

Using data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N = 347) this study examines effects of new partners' and fathers' contributions on relationship stability among mothers with 3 year-old children and new resident partners.  Mothers were more likely to live with the new partner two years later if he was working, if they had lived with new partner for longer, and if they had not recently lived with the father. New partners' engagement with children increased relationship stability, yet only when the partner was not working. Fathers' involvement (coparenting, visitation, financial) was not associated with mother-partner relationship stability.

Objectives

This study examines the following research questions: 1. Are structural investments, parenting investments, and work status of new partners associated with relationship stability between mothers of young children and new resident partners? 2. Are associations between partners’ parenting investments and relationship stability moderated by the partner’s work status? 3. Are structural investments and parenting investments with biological fathers associated with relationship stability between mothers and new resident partners?

Parental Custody Arrangement Decision Making Model

By Jaimee Hartenstein, Mindy Markham, Kali Summers

This grounded theory study examined how parents make custody arrangement decisions for their children following divorce. Eleven parents with shared physical and legal custody arrangements were interviewed; 9 parents were interviewed twice. Ten factors were found to influence the custody arrangement decisions of divorcing parents: former partner, children, work, new partner, use of a lawyer, role of family, parenting role, place of residence, finances, and divorce. Parents weighed perceived costs and rewards when making custody arrangement decisions. The Custody Arrangement Decision Making Model was developed and provides a foundation for professionals working with parents to assist in custody arrangement decisions.

Objectives

1. To discuss the custody arrangement decision making process. 2. To analyze the custody arrangement decision making model. 3. To discuss the implications of the custody arrangement decision making model has on the field.

Co-parenting After Divorce: Perceived Competence as a Coping Mechanism

By Anthony Ferraro, Karen Oehme, Mallory Lucier-Greer

The current study utilizes a stress process approach to study how post-divorce co-parenting behaviors (specifically dimensions of support, overt conflict, internally-regulated covert conflict, and externally-regulated covert conflict) relate to individual wellbeing. Furthermore, this study considers the linking mechanism of self-efficacy and the potential of perceived parental competence to act as a coping mechanism. Results indicate significant direct effects between dimensions of co-parenting and wellbeing, significant indirect effects through self-efficacy, and that certain pathways are moderated by the perceived parental competence of the former partner. Implications for research, education, and therapy are discussed.

Objectives

1. Determine if dimensions of co-parenting are significantly related to the latent indicator of wellbeing 2. Determine if self-efficacy mediates the relationship between dimensions of co-parenting and the latent indicator of wellbeing 3. Explore perceived parental competence of the former partner as a coping mechanism which can impact the ways in which co-parenting relates to well-being

Downloads

209-04 - Co-parenting After Divorce: Presentation (ppt)

209-04 - Co-parenting After Divorce: Handout (doc)

 

 

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