Community Matters: Race and Cultural Implications

Concurrent Sessions 8

Addie Wyman Battalen, Ashley Landers, Jennifer Bellamy, Sharon Danes, Noah Gagner, Sandy White Hawk, Kelly Roberts, Waymon Hinson, Paul Emrich, Barbara Underwood, Jennifer Young, Laura Golojuch, HaeDong Kim, Norman Epstein, Youn Mi Lee; Facilitator: Lorey Wheeler

8:30 AM
9:45 AM
Location
Salon 3
Session #
314
Session Type
Lightning Paper
Session Focus
  • Research
Organized By
  • Ethnic Minorities

About the Session

  • 314-01 - Parents’ Racial Socialization in Lesbian, Gay, and Heterosexual Adoptive Families
    By Addie Wyman Battalen
  • 314-02 - Placement Instability of American Indian Children in Long-Term Foster Care
    By Ashley Landers, Jennifer Bellamy, Sharon Danes, Noah Gagner, Sandy White Hawk
  • 314-03 - The Chickasaw Enculturation Scale: Rationale, Development and Analysis
    By Kelly Roberts, Waymon Hinson, Paul Emrich, Barbara Underwood
  • 314-04 - Asian American Family Teachings on Race: A Qualitative Exploration
    By Jennifer Young, Laura Golojuch, HaeDong Kim, Norman Epstein
  • 314-05 - Asian-American LGBs’ Identity, Discomfort in Ethnic Community, & Well-being
    By HaeDong Kim, Norman Epstein
  • 314-06 - Human Science Majors’ Cultural Competence and Attitude Toward Elderly Immigrants
    By Youn Mi Lee

Facilitator: Lorey Wheeler

Abstract(s)

Parents’ Racial Socialization in Lesbian, Gay, and Heterosexual Adoptive Families

By Addie Wyman Battalen

Families are increasingly multiracial, yet information about how parents socialize their children about race and racism is often overlooked, especially within families formed through transracial adoption. This study of 1,020 adoptive heterosexual, lesbian, and gay parents builds upon existing racial and cultural socialization frameworks to assess the validity of established racial socialization scales with sexual minority parents. Results indicate initial validity of the measures with this often overlooked population. Additionally, heterosexual, lesbian, and gay adoptive parents endorse the importance of socialization practices related to race and racism. Research, policy, and practice implications will be provided.

Objectives

a) Establish the validity of the Transracial Adoptive Parenting Scale (TAPS) with lesbian and gay adoptive parents. b) Establish the validity of the Racial Socialization Self-Efficacy Scale (RSSES) with lesbian and gay adoptive parents. c) Examine rating scores of parental perceptions and experiences related to racial socialization in transracial lesbian, gay, and heterosexual adoptive families.

Placement Instability of American Indian Children in Long-Term Foster Care

By Ashley Landers, Jennifer Bellamy, Sharon Danes, Noah Gagner, Sandy White Hawk

This study enhances the understanding of American Indian children (ages 2-15) in long-term foster care by exploring differences in placement instability for American Indian children compared to children of other races (African American and Caucasian). Baseline and 36-month follow-up data from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-being (NSCAW I) were analyzed using propensity score matching. Race (being American Indian) had a significant effect on placement instability at 36 months (in the African American comparison). Future research is needed to shed light on the cultural factors beyond race that may account for differences in placement instability.  

Objectives

1. To increase knowledge of the unique historical and cultural context of American Indian children in long-term foster care compared to children of other races. 2. To compare placement instability among American Indian, African American, and Caucasian children in long-term foster care. 3. To evaluate the effect of race on placement instability for children in long-term foster care.

The Chickasaw Enculturation Scale: Rationale, Development and Analysis

By Kelly Roberts, Waymon Hinson, Paul Emrich, Barbara Underwood

  A variety of enculturation inventories exist within the social science milieu. They vary in both theoretical orientation as well as ethnicity covering African Americans, Asian Americans, Latinos, and American Indians. The American Indian Enculturation Scale (AIES) was useful yet “pan-Indian" and showed no effects when tested as a therapy enhancement for Chickasaw population cultural engagement. Because cultural engagement has been shown as a factor in identity development and emotional healing, we utilized elder focus groups and cultural experts to develop the Chickasaw Enculturation Scale. The authors then collected data and conducted an EFA and other psychometric tests; discussion is included.

Objectives

1. Identify various ways enculturation scales can be used for biopsychosocialspiritual interventions. 2. Examine culturally appropriate ways of collecting data to construct the an American Indian enculturation instrument. 3. Interpret psychometric results for the Chickasaw Enculturation Scale.

Asian American Family Teachings on Race: A Qualitative Exploration

By Jennifer Young, Laura Golojuch, HaeDong Kim, Norman Epstein

Asian Americans must navigate the worlds of both their heritage culture and American culture. This complex process has been understudied, and little is known about how Asian American youth integrate the multiple messages about race that they receive. The present study is a qualitative analysis exploring racial teachings and messages promoted in families. 12 semi-structured interviews were conducted with Asian American young adults to explore racial socialization practices promoted in their families. Key themes included: straddling two cultures, race not openly being talked about, promoting an attitude of acceptance, and educating parents about race.

Objectives

(1) To utilize qualitative research methods to explore racial socialization in Asian American families. (2) To analyze the contextual factors that influence racial identity for Asian American adults. (3) To document communication styles employed by Asian American families during discussions of race.

Asian-American LGBs’ Identity, Discomfort in Ethnic Community, & Well-being

By HaeDong Kim, Norman Epstein

The dual minority status of Asian-American sexual minorities puts them at greater risk for discrimination and negative health outcomes. Additionally, they face the possibility of being marginalized within their racial/ethnic communities. However, there is no prior research on how the dual-identity formation of Asian-American sexual minorities might affect their experiences in racial/ethnic communities and their well-being. This study investigates whether low positive affect mediates the association between discomfort in one’s racial/ethnic community and self-reported general health of Asian-American sexual minorities. It also investigates whether affective responses differ between those who have achieved dual identity development and those who have not.

Objectives

1. To test if frequency of experiencing discomfort in one’s racial/ethnic community is associated with self-reported general health status of Asian American sexual minorities. 2. To test if positive affect mediates the association between discomfort in racial/ethnic community and self-reported general health of Asian American sexual minorities. 3. To identify possible differences in racial/ethnic community experience and health status between Asian American sexual minorities who have reached dual identity development and those who have not.

Human Science Majors’ Cultural Competence and Attitude Toward Elderly Immigrants

By Youn Mi Lee

Considering the geographical setting of the Southern region of the U.S., which is mostly divided into two races, Black and White, this study is to examine human science major undergraduates’ cultural competence and attitude toward the intersectionality group, elderly immigrants. The data are currently collected and will be analyzed by summer 2017. The findings are expected to increase awareness of the need for culturally competent programs to educate the students on diverse populations and give useful information to the university programs that helps to prepare undergraduate students to meet societal demands related to the minority population in the future.

Objectives

(1) To analyze human science major students’ overall cultural competence and related factors. (2) To analyze human science major students’ attitudes toward elderly immigrants and related factors. (3) To analyze how human science major students’ cultural competences are related to their attitudes toward old immigrants. Race, year in college, experience of visiting/living in other countries, and relationships with grandparents are also closely examined.

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