Couples Issues: Marital Satisfaction, Communication, Conflict Resolution, Parenthood, and Mental and Physical Health

Concurrent Sessions 9

Alexander Reid, Edna Brown, Ruihong Nie, Nan Zhou, Hongjian Cao, Dayoung Bae, Kandauda A. S. Wickrama, Heidi Radunovich, Suzanne Smith, Lenna Ontai, Caitlin Hunter, Rachel Cannella, Xiaomin Li, Xiaoyi Fang, Natasha Seiter, Rachel Lucas-Thompson; Facilitator: Katharine Didericksen

1:45 PM
3:00 PM
Location
Salon 14
Session #
333
Session Type
Lightning Paper
Session Focus
  • Research
Organized By
  • Families & Health

About the Session

  • 333-01 - Marital Quality and Parent-Child Relationship Quality
    By Alexander Reid, Edna Brown
  • 333-02 - Marital Hostility and Adolescents’ Problem Behavior: The Moderating Roles of Cultural Values
    By Ruihong Nie, Nan Zhou, Hongjian Cao
  • 333-03 - Pathways to Heterogeneous Relationship Dissolution Experiences in Young Adulthood: A Person-centered Approach
    By Dayoung Bae, Kandauda A. S. Wickrama
  • 333-04 - Does Partner Support Affect the Physical and Mental Health of Poor, Rural Mothers?
    By Heidi Radunovich, Suzanne Smith, Lenna Ontai, Caitlin Hunter, Rachel Cannella
  • 333-05 - Daily Communication, Conflict Resolution, and Marital Quality in Chinese Marriage: A Three-wave, Cross-lagged Analysis
    By Xiaomin Li, Hongjian Cao, Nan Zhou, Xiaoyi Fang
  • 333-06 - Partner Communication Behaviors and Diurnal Cortisol Patterns
    By Natasha Seiter, Rachel Lucas-Thompson

Facilitator: Katharine Didericksen

Abstract(s)

Marital Quality and Parent-Child Relationship Quality

By Alexander Reid, Edna Brown

One factor that has been shown to predict parent-child relationship quality is marital quality between spouses (Cummings & Davies, 2011).  Additionally, husbands’ and wives’ poor marital quality may negatively influence their perceptions of their spouses’ relationship quality with their child (Enger, 1988).  Using data from wave 4 of the Early Years of Marriage study, the current findings suggest marital quality was positively linked to mothers’ and fathers’ perceptions of their spouses’ relationship quality with their child.  Additional analyses will be conducted to examine if the relationship between marital quality and parent-child relationship quality is moderated by the child’s gender.

Objectives

To assess the relationship between mothers' and fathers' marital quality, and mother-child relationship quality and father-child relationship quality To assess partner effects between mothers' and fathers' marital quality, and mother-child relationship quality and father-child relationship quality To examine if the relationship between marital quality and parent-child relationship quality is moderated by the child’s gender

Marital Hostility and Adolescents’ Problem Behavior: The Moderating Roles of Cultural Values

By Ruihong Nie, Nan Zhou, Hongjian Cao

This study examined the potential moderating effects of collectivism, family obligation, and social harmony in the association between marital hostility and adolescents’ problem behavior among 4036 Chinese adolescents. Results showed that associations between marital hostility and internalizing and/or externalizing problems was stronger among adolescents with high levels of collectivism or family obligation than those with low levels of collectivism or family obligation. Such findings enrich the literature about the interparental conflicts in relation to youth problem behaviors in the presence of specific cultural values.

Objectives

(1) To examine the association between marital hostility and youth developmental outcomes among Chinese adolescents; (2) To examine the potential moderating role of cultural values in the associaiton between maritla hostility and youth developmental outcomes; (3) To examine the distinct roles of social harmony, collectivism, and family obligation in conditioning the impact of marital hostility on youth adjustment difficuties.

Pathways to Heterogeneous Relationship Dissolution Experiences in Young Adulthood: A Person-centered Approach

By Dayoung Bae, Kandauda A. S. Wickrama

De-standardized and individualized life pathways of today's young adults indicate that they are more likely to engage in diverse and serial romantic relationships. Although studies on romantic relationships are abundant, the cumulative relationship dissolution experiences during young adulthood is not yet completely understood. Using a person-centered approach, the present study attempts to extend past research by (1) investigating heterogeneity in romantic experiences of young adults, (2) identify distal predictors of community and family contexts associated with these different experiences, and (3) identify mediating processes that link early life contexts and later romantic relationship experiences of young adults.

Objectives

(1) To identify heterogeneity in romantic relationship dissolution experiences in young adulthood (2) To investigate longitudinal associations between early structural adversity and later romantic relationship experiences from a life course perspective (3) To identify psychosocial mediating processes that link early life contexts and later romantic relationship experiences of young adults

Does Partner Support Affect the Physical and Mental Health of Poor, Rural Mothers?

By Heidi Radunovich, Suzanne Smith, Lenna Ontai, Caitlin Hunter, Rachel Cannella

Poverty and rural location are associated with poorer physical and mental health, and mothers are even more at risk. This study examined the role that having a partner, and relationship quality, play in buffering life stressors of poor, rural moms. Measures of BMI, physical health, mental health, presence of a partner, and partner relationship characteristics were obtained for a sample of 444 low income, rural mothers. Partner status had little impact on health, but both having a partner and having a good relationship reduced report of depressive symptoms for poor, rural mothers.

Objectives

1. To examine the physical and mental health of poor, rural mothers. 2. To determine whether presence of a partner affects physical and mental health of poor, rural mothers. 3. To assess the role that relationship quality may play in the physical and mental health of poor, rural mothers.

Daily Communication, Conflict Resolution, and Marital Quality in Chinese Marriage: A Three-wave, Cross-lagged Analysis

By Xiaomin Li, Hongjian Cao, Nan Zhou, Xiaoyi Fang

Based on three annual wave data obtained from 268 Chinese couples during the early years of marriage and using a cross-lagged approach, the present study examined the longitudinal reciprocal associations among marital daily communication, marital conflict resolution, and marital quality. Results indicated that daily communication and conflict resolution could predict marital quality above and beyond the other, whereas marital quality could not predict daily communication or conflict resolution. We also found a statistically significant indirect association linking husbands’ daily communication at Wave 1 to husbands’ marital quality at Wave 3 via husbands’ conflict resolution at Wave 2.

Objectives

(1) To examine the debate on directionality of the association between either daily marital communication or marital conflict resolution and marital satisfaction. (2) To Investigate marital daily communication and marital conflict resolution simultaneously and thus testing the unique roles of these two types of marital interaction. (3) To provide empirical evidence to support or refute the proposition that communicative processes in mundane marital lives may lay an important foundation for the way partners interact with each when encountering more major marital events such as marital conflicts.

Partner Communication Behaviors and Diurnal Cortisol Patterns

By Natasha Seiter, Rachel Lucas-Thompson

Our goal was to investigate associations of observed couple communication behaviors and self-reported marital conflict with diurnal cortisol patterns. Participants engaged in a conflict discussion which was videotaped and coded for negative and positive communication behaviors, and also reported marital conflict. Cortisol samples were taken across two days for each individual. Results suggested that female partners were more likely to display dysregulated cortisol production patterns when male partners displayed less-positive and more-negative observed communication behaviors. More self-reported conflict was associated with male partners' less healthy diurnal cortisol patterns. These results indicate implications of communication behaviors for stress physiological functioning.

Objectives

(1) to investigate associations of observed couple communication behaviors with diurnal cortisol patterns (2) to investigate associations of self-reported marital conflict with diurnal cortisol patterns (3) to inform the work of couple therapists and health practitioners, in investigating implications of communication behaviors for stress physiological functioning

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Conference Session