Cutting Edge Topics in Family Therapy

Concurrent Sessions 7

Bora Jin, Jody Russon, Guy Diamond, Emily Jordan, Elizabeth Wieling, Tai Mendenhall, Nathan Taylor, Paul Springer, Richard Bischoff, Kara Cruickshank, Cameron Brown, Jared Durtschi, Jeremy Yorgason

3:15 PM
4:30 PM
Location
Salon 15
Session #
242
Session Type
Paper
Session Focus
  • Research
Organized By
  • Family Therapy

About the Session

  • 242-01 - Effectiveness of ABFT for Reducing Family Dysfunction among Suicidal Youth
    By Bora Jin, Jody Russon, Guy Diamond
  • 242-02 - Barriers to Rural Mental Health Care: Clinicians’ Perspectives
    By Emily Jordan, Elizabeth Wieling, Tai Mendenhall
  • 242-03 - Applying Telemental Health Interventions
    By Nathan Taylor, Paul Springer, Richard Bischoff, Kara Cruickshank
  • 242-04 - Chronic Disease and Attachment: Predicting Trajectories of Physical Health
    By Cameron Brown, Jared Durtschi, Jeremy Yorgason

Abstract(s)

Effectiveness of ABFT for Reducing Family Dysfunction among Suicidal Youth

By Bora Jin, Jody Russon, Guy Diamond

The impact of parent-child relationships on youth psychopathology has been well-supported. This paper seeks to understand if a) family dysfunction is reduced as a result of receiving individual or family treatment, b) ABFT is more effective for decreasing family dysfunction, and c) there is acceleration in change of family dysfunction. Participants were 129 suicidal youth receiving either ABFT or FE-NST. Growth curve analysis was used to examine change in family dysfunction. Results show greater reductions in family conflict in ABFT. These findings support systemic therapy for targeting changes in family-level functioning for this high risk population.

Objectives

Participants will 1) Describe findings from key studies examining the role of parent-child relationship quality and family functioning in adolescent depression and suicide. 2) Analyze the primary differences between ABFT (a family approach) and FE-NST (an individual approach) in the treatment of adolescent suicide. 3) Evaluate findings from the present study examining whether ABFT or FE-NST promotes greater change in family dysfunction over time.

Barriers to Rural Mental Health Care: Clinicians’ Perspectives

By Emily Jordan, Elizabeth Wieling, Tai Mendenhall

Researchers have identified barriers to mental health care in rural areas relating to the availability, accessibility, and acceptability of services. The aim of the present study was to learn more about these barriers and how to overcome them from the perspective of eight rural mental health professionals. In-depth, qualitative interviews were conducted, transcribed, coded, and analyzed following a hermenuetic phenomenological design. Four overarching themes emerged: a) rural communities maintain a distinct culture; b) rural practitioners face unique challenges in providing care; c) rural communities experience barriers to mental health care; d) innovative ideas are needed for overcoming barriers to care.

Objectives

1) To analyze the experiences of mental health practitioners living and working in rural communities. 2) To uncover more about the impact of barriers to mental health care in rural areas from the perspectives of clinicians. 3) To investigate expert opinions about potential methods and interventions for overcoming barriers to mental health care.

Applying Telemental Health Interventions

By Nathan Taylor, Paul Springer, Richard Bischoff, Kara Cruickshank

Telemental health is a popular solution to address inequalities in the distribution of mental health providers. Despite demonstrated effectiveness of telemental health, there is a gap in the literature of how to apply interventions in telemental health. The purpose of our qualitative study is to understand how therapists apply sand tray, de-escalation, and family sculpts via telemental health. Therapists participated in a semi-structured interview and described applying interventions face-to-face and via telemental health. A research team is analyzing the transcripts according to research questions. Findings will inform training programs and therapist of how to apply interventions via telemental health.

Objectives

Demonstrate the need for additional skills and training needed for telemental health. Evaluate the skills needed for experiential interventions like sand tray and family skills. Evaluate skills needed for couple and family interventions like de-escalation and sand tray.

Chronic Disease and Attachment: Predicting Trajectories of Physical Health

By Cameron Brown, Jared Durtschi, Jeremy Yorgason

Chronic diseases are common within the US, with poor personal and economic outcomes. Research has linked relationship satisfaction with health, yet less is known about mental health and relationship processes involved. Using data from 110 individuals with a chronic disease and in a romantic relationship, a latent growth analysis of physical health across four years was conducted. Attachment styles and depressive symptoms were used to predict the intercept and slope of physical health. Results indicated that higher depressive symptoms were linked with lower initial physical health. Also, higher attachment anxiety was linked with steeper declines in physical health trajectories.

Objectives

1. To evaluate the extent that depressive symptoms are linked with initial levels and trajectories of physical health outcomes among those with a chronic disease across four years. 2. To evaluate the extent that adult romantic attachment is linked with initial levels and trajectories of physical health outcomes among those with a chronic disease across four years. 3. To evaluate indirect effects of adult romantic attachment predicting initial levels and trajectories of physical health outcomes through depressive symptoms among those with a chronic disease across four years.

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