Delivering Family Education Programs: Evaluation of Approaches

Concurrent Sessions 10

Nate Stoddard, Jeremy Kanter, Chelsea Garneau-Rosner, Melissa Herzog, Naomi Brower, Pamela Payne, Sharon Ballard, Eboni Baugh, Lisa Tyndall, Susan Walker, Seonghee Hong, Dawn Cassidy, Anne Clarkson, Jessica Troilo, Richard Feistman, Tyler Jamison; Facilitator: Bridget A. Walsh

4:30 PM
5:45 PM
Location
Salon 2
Session #
341
Session Type
Lightning Paper
Session Focus
  • Research
  • Practice
Organized By
  • Education & Enrichment

About the Session

  • 341-01 - Improvement in Relationship Outcomes Following a Gottman-Based CRE Program
    By Nate Stoddard, Jeremy Kanter, Chelsea Garneau-Rosner, Melissa Herzog
  • 341-02 - Lessons Learned From Organizing a Multi-county Marriage Celebration
    By Naomi Brower, Pamela Payne
  • 341-03 - Comparison of Online vs. Face to Face Delivery of a Parent Education Program
    By Sharon Ballard, Eboni Baugh, Lisa Tyndall
  • 341-04 - The Use of Technology by Family Educators: Comparison by Type of Practice
    By Susan Walker, Seonghee Hong, Dawn Cassidy, Anne Clarkson
  • 341-05 - How Do Family Life Educators Discuss NEPEF Standards in Their Goals?
    By Jessica Troilo
  • 341-06 - Teen Parenting: Intervention Now Means Prevention for Emerging Adulthood
    By Richard Feistman, Tyler Jamison

Facilitator: Bridget A. Walsh

Abstract(s)

Improvement in Relationship Outcomes Following a Gottman-Based CRE Program

By Nate Stoddard, Jeremy Kanter, Chelsea Garneau-Rosner, Melissa Herzog

Using a sample of CRE participants, change in Gottman-based couple friendship constructs (love maps, fondness/admiration, and turning toward) was evaluated. Factor analysis results are presented for a new measure of self- and partner-reported turning toward. Additionally, mixed-effects ANCOVAs demonstrated a significant increase in the means of each friendship construct from pre- to post-test. A structural equation model is proposed that will examine whether initial satisfaction levels and race moderate change in the friendship constructs. Findings from this study will inform developers of content in CRE and will help ensure that participants get relevant curricula to match their life circumstances.

Objectives

1. To evaluate a new measure of turning toward 2. To examine change in friendship constructs following a Gottman-based CRE program 3. To examine whether initial levels of relationship satisfaction and race moderate change in the friendship constructs

Lessons Learned From Organizing a Multi-county Marriage Celebration

By Naomi Brower, Pamela Payne

It is well documented (Cowan, Cowan and Knox, 2010; Halford & Bodenmann, 2013; Cowan and Cowan, 2014) that individuals in communities need and value opportunities to engage in marital education and enrichment programs. Often individuals are interested in learning strategies that will enhance their interpersonal relationships. One way in which this can be done is through educational events that focus on specific topics. This presentation focuses on specific strategies and lessons learned in hosting a collaborative relationship enrichment event across multiple counties. Tips and tools for a successful Marriage Celebration Event will be discussed.

Objectives

(1) Demonstrate the value of organizing a large community based healthy relationship event in order to motivate others create similar events. (2) Share strategies and lessons learned in hosting a successful multi-county community relationship event. (3) Share best practices for implementing a successful Marriage Celebration.

Comparison of Online vs. Face to Face Delivery of a Parent Education Program

By Sharon Ballard, Eboni Baugh, Lisa Tyndall

This study was a comparison of face to face and online delivery of the Triple P parenting program (Sanders, 2012).  Quantitative data measured program effectiveness and qualitative data measured experience with the program, strengths and challenges of delivery format, benefits of the program, perceived support, and partner involvement. Results yielded similar program effects; yet, the lack of an educator might have influenced the online parents’ perception of the program and of parenting.  Face-to-face participants reported a supportive environment and enjoyed engaging with other parents.  Online participants reported challenges with getting started, persisting through the program and involvement of co-parents.

Objectives

To compare face to face vs online delivery of an evidence-based parenting program To increase understanding of the importance of program delivery's affect on program experience To provide implications for effective online program delivery

The Use of Technology by Family Educators: Comparison by Type of Practice

By Susan Walker, Seonghee Hong, Dawn Cassidy, Anne Clarkson

This research examines the use of information and communications technology by family educators, and factors related to that use (n=688). Using a 2016 data set from a national online survey of family education professionals, the study compares four job categories: Family Life Educators (FLE), Parenting Educators (PE), Other Family Professionals (OFP) and Other Education Professionals (OEP). Although some similarities exist, with attitudes fairly positive and time to learn how to integrate technology into instructional practice expressed as a common barrier, results suggest differences in all variables. Implications for preparation and support on technology integration in family education are offered.

Objectives

Identify trends in technology use by family education professionals in the US. Identify differences in technology use by family education professionals by types of work. Identify differences in supports and barriers to technology use by family education professionals by type of work.

How Do Family Life Educators Discuss NEPEF Standards in Their Goals?

By Jessica Troilo

This qualitative project sought to understand how 53 Family Life Educators (FLEs) in an Appalachian state identified behaviors, outcomes, and challenges using thematic analysis. FLEs stated four behaviors they believed were essential to their roles, believed they met with four challenges to their essential behaviors, which were believed to impact abilities to meet the expected outcomes of FLE. Their behaviors, outcomes, and challenges corresponded to the National Extension Parenting Educators' Framework. A primary implication is that when FLEs engage in behaviors deemed essential, positive outcomes for parents and themselves are possible, however challenges negatively interrupt that process.

Objectives

O1: To identify what FLEs believe are essential behaviors, challenges, and outcomes of their roles as FLEs. O2: To analyze how the identified behaviors and outcomes correspond to NEPEF’s priority practices and processes. O3: To demonstrate how the identified behaviors and outcomes contribute to family well-being.

Teen Parenting: Intervention Now Means Prevention for Emerging Adulthood

By Richard Feistman, Tyler Jamison

In this study we used data we collected from teen fathers and their service providers to make an empirical case for the needs of teen fathers in the present (e.g., employment, support in navigating school) and what they believe to be their long-term fathering needs (e.g., living wage employment, Diploma/ Degree). Preliminary findings suggest teen fathers present a unique challenge in terms of intervention, but also an opportunity for prevention. Programmers indicated that younger teen fathers are the most difficult to work with and that a persistent mentor seemed to help move them into a successful trajectory for emerging adulthood.

Objectives

To analyze the fatherhood needs of teen fathers from their own perspectives. To assess consensus between the services provided in the E3 Teen Fatherhood Program in meeting fathers’ expressed needs. To demonstrate the need for programming grounded in participant perspectives and spanning multiple developmental stages.

Downloads

341-05 - How Do Family Life Educators Discuss NEPEF Standards in Their Goals?

 

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