Enhancing Family Science Programs and Student Experiences Within Them

Concurrent Sessions 10

Kari Morgan, Madisen Reeves, Michael Langlais, Sylvia Asay, Mitch Vaterlaus, Anthony Walker, Erica Jordan, Eric Middleton, Jennifer Reinke, Michael Walcheski; Facilitator: Annie Insley

4:30 PM
5:45 PM
Location
Salon 11
Session #
340
Session Type
Paper
Session Focus
  • Research
  • Practice
Organized By
  • Advancing Family Science

About the Session

  • 340-01 - How HDFS Students Choose a Major: Implications for Undergraduate Programs
    By Kari Morgan, Madisen Reeves
  • 340-02 - A Qualitative Examination of Male Enrollment in Family Science Courses
    By Michael Langlais, Sylvia Asay, Mitch Vaterlaus, Anthony Walker
  • 340-03 - Determining Job Prospects for Family Science Bachelor's Degree Earners
    By Erica Jordan, Eric Middleton
  • 340-04 - Preparing Today’s Family Science Doctoral Students to Teach: 20 Years Later
    By Jennifer Reinke, Michael Walcheski

Facilitator: Annie Insley

Abstract(s)

How HDFS Students Choose a Major: Implications for Undergraduate Programs

By Kari Morgan, Madisen Reeves

Choosing a major is a significant decision for college students. A better understanding of how HDFS students choose their majors can be of benefit to HDFS faculty and administrators as they work to recruit and retain students. This presentation will share the results of a study that explored how 37 HDFS students chose a major. Results suggest that HDFS students choose their majors based on past experiences (life events and activities, both positive and negative), and future goals related to careers. The results of this study can be used to strengthen HDFS faculty and administrators' recruitment and retention efforts.

Objectives

1) Participants will increase their understanding of how HDFS undergraduate students choose a major. 2) Participants will understand the connection between how HDFS students choose a major and issues related to recruitment and retention. 3) Participants will leave with specific strategies and ideas for recruiting and retaining undergraduate students into HDFS programs.

A Qualitative Examination of Male Enrollment in Family Science Courses

By Michael Langlais, Sylvia Asay, Mitch Vaterlaus, Anthony Walker

This qualitative study examines undergraduate students' perspectives concerning the paucity of male students enrolled in family science courses. Undergraduate students (N = 288) from three universities completed an online survey concerning male enrollment in family science courses. Participants described a social stigma regarding lower numbers of male students in family science classes, with males stating that family science topics are more relevant to women and females saying that topics are uncomfortable for men. Additionally, participants believed that increasing awareness, advertising, and dispelling stereotypes would promote male enrollment in family science courses. Implications regarding gender balance in family sciences are discussed.

Objectives

(1) To analyze undergraduate students’ perspectives of gender differences in family science courses. (2) To identify reasons why there is a lack of enrollment of male students in family science courses. (3) To describe student generated methods to increase male enrollment in family science classes.

Determining Job Prospects for Family Science Bachelor's Degree Earners

By Erica Jordan, Eric Middleton

The employability of family science students has been a persistent question raised by students, universities, and parents, especially because many famly science students will not go on to graduate school. This presentation highlights the results of a content analysis designed to systematically evaluate the qualifications, knowledge, and skills sought by employers advertising full-time jobs that might be pursued by family science majors interested in working to serve individuals and families. Specifically, occupational categories and desired education qualifications, content knowledge, and skills will be presented.

Objectives

1. Assess the current jobs available to family science bachelor's degree holders. 2. Identify the most common occupational categories for these jobs. 3. Analyze the most commonly required skills and domains of content knowledge for these jobs.

Preparing Today’s Family Science Doctoral Students to Teach: 20 Years Later

By Jennifer Reinke, Michael Walcheski

Research reveals that many current graduate programs fail to adequately prepare Doctoral students for the demands of academic positions (Austin, 2002; Olsen & Crawford, 1998). The purpose of this study was to examine if and how family science PhD programs have changed in the past 20 years regarding preparing family science PhD students to teach. One hundred and three family science program directors, faculty/academic staff, and Doctoral students completed a mixed methods Qualtrics survey. Though the current study suggests teaching preparation is limited at the institutional level, there is significant progress being made at the department level.

Objectives

Objectives 1. Compare results from 1997 and 2017 studies on preparing family science Doctoral students to teach 2. Identify resources that would serve to enhance teacher training 3. Identify components that encourage or hinder teacher training

Bundle name
Conference Session