Ethnic Identity

Concurrent Sessions 6

Denise Lewis, Danielle Augustine, Savannah Young, Kristy Shih, Nancy Lo, Pooja Brar, Jacqueline Braughton, Catherine Solheim, Susan Chuang, Robert Moreno, April Few-Demo; Facilitator: Chun Creaser

1:45 PM
3:00 PM
Location
Salon 12
Session #
232
Session Type
Paper
Session Focus
  • Research
Organized By
  • Ethnic Minorities

About the Session

  • 232-01 - Shifting Ethnic Identity: Southeast Asian Families in the United States
    By Denise Lewis, Danielle Augustine, Savannah Young
  • 232-02 - “I’m half and half!”: Ethnic identity development of former “parachute kids”
    By Kristy Shih
  • 232-03 - Ethnic Identity Development of Hmong College Students through an Undergraduate Learning Abroad Program
    By Nancy Lo, Pooja Brar, Jacqueline Braughton, Catherine Solheim
  • 232-04 - Build the Wall!: The Trump Effect on Racial Socialization & Ethnic Identity
    By Susan Chuang, Robert Moreno, April Few-Demo

Facilitator: Chun Creaser

Abstract(s)

Shifting Ethnic Identity: Southeast Asian Families in the United States

By Denise Lewis, Danielle Augustine, Savannah Young

We explore ethnic identity of Asian American immigrant families with roots in Cambodia, Burma, and the Philippines to reveal a lifelong process of identity formation shaped by social, historical, and cultural factors. As collectivist beliefs and behaviors foundational to immigrants from these nations collide with individualist beliefs and behaviors dominant in the United States, identity can shift. It is this shift in self and collective identity construction that drives our research on its fluidity. To address this ethnic identity fluidity, we provide insights into factors that influence ethnic identity such as nativity, immigrant generation status, gender, and age.

Objectives

Attendees will gain an understanding of the intersectionality of social, historical, and cultural factors that influence ethnic identity. Attendees will gain insights into the application of Bronfenbrenner’s and Morris’s (2006) bioecological model of human development and Berry’s model of acculturation (2003) strategies on social, historical, and cultural factors influencing the disassembly, reconstruction, and redefinition of ethnic identity. Attendees will understand how intergenerational dissonance influences both family relations and a collective ethnic identity.

“I’m half and half!”: Ethnic identity development of former “parachute kids”

By Kristy Shih

This paper qualitatively explores ethnic identity development of 37 former "parachute kids" from Taiwan. Emerging findings suggest there are heterogeneity of ethnic identities among this population. Many identified themselves as Taiwanese, 1.5 generations, mixed, or "half and half". In addition, there are various factors that influence how "parachute kids" racially/ethnically identify themselves, including ongoing connection with their culture of origin, experiencing racism, confusion, ambivalence, and barriers. Many also described possessing dual identities that encompass their Taiwanese background and American culture and values.

Objectives

To explore ethnic development of former "parachute kids" from Taiwan. To explore factors that contribute to former "parachute kids'" ethnic development. To explore whether former "parachute kids" experience shifting identities and how they manage their various identities.

Ethnic Identity Development of Hmong College Students through an Undergraduate Learning Abroad Program

By Nancy Lo, Pooja Brar, Jacqueline Braughton, Catherine Solheim

The transition from adolescence to adulthood is a stressful period of ambiguity for emerging Hmong adults. "Heritage-seeking" experiences, like learning abroad programs, may resolve this tension by allowing personal exploration of cultural meanings. Few studies have investigated the relationship between heritage-seeking experiences and ethnic identity. This qualitative study addresses this gap by examining the experiences of sixteen Hmong-American students' three-week learning abroad journey to Thailand. Preliminary analysis of post-course digital narratives have identified two major themes; identity search and identity belonging, and seven sub-themes; identity affirmation; connection to history; cultural artifacts; power/privilege; ongoing journey; cultural transmission; and negotiating identities.

Objectives

1. To examine the experiences of Hmong-American students’ three-week learning abroad journey to Thailand. 2. To explore how Hmong-American students use this heritage-seeking experience to negotiate between their multiple identities. 3.To clarify the processes of identity search and identity belonging within emerging Hmong adults by identifying concrete examples.

Build the Wall!: The Trump Effect on Racial Socialization & Ethnic Identity

By Susan Chuang, Robert Moreno, April Few-Demo

When Donald Trump announced his candidacy for the President of the United States, he stated, "When Mexico sends its people, they are not sending their best....they're bringing drugs, they're bringing crime, they're rapists, and some, I assume, are good people." Trump has reinvigorated an old culture of racism, legitimizing hateful rhetoric to open forums, causing fear among ethnic minority (EM) children and families in the US. This paper is a theoretical rumination about how the social phenomenon of the Trump Effect has challenged our understanding of EM children and their families through the lens of Bronfenbrenner's ecological model (1977).

Objectives

Objectives are to: (1) critically challenge the assumptions of Bronfenbrenner’s model and explore how one person, President Donald Trump, is relevant in all ecosystems; (2) suggest new ways of interpreting the model; and (3) examine the role of social media and its relationship to the ecosystems.

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232-03 - Ethnic Identity Development of Hmong College Students through an Undergraduate Learning Abroad Program

 

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