Ethnic Minority Youth and Factors That Contribute to Adjustment

Concurrent Sessions 11

Zoe Taylor, Blake Jones, Nayantara Nair, Evich Carly, Sharde' McNeil Smith, Diamond Y. Bravo, Adriana J. Umaña-Taylor, Kimberly A. Updegraff, Laudan B. Jahromi, Chelsea L. Derlan, Ciara Collins, Beth Russell; Facilitator: Jordan Arellanes 

11:00 AM
12:15 PM
Location
Salon 3
Session #
410
Session Type
Paper
Session Focus
  • Research
  • Practice
Organized By
  • Ethnic Minorities

About the Session

  • 410-01 - Physiological Responses, Effortful Control, and Adjustment in Latino Youth
    By Zoe Taylor, Blake Jones, Nayantara Nair, Evich Carly
  • 410-02 - Patterns of Racial Discrimination among Black Parent-Adolescent Dyads
    By Sharde' McNeil Smith
  • 410-03 - Family Dynamics and Early Academic Outcomes Among Children of Teen Mothers: Everyday Conflict and Coparental Conflict
    By Diamond Y. Bravo, Adriana J. Umaña-Taylor, Kimberly A. Updegraff, Laudan B. Jahromi, Chelsea L. Derlan
  • 410-04 - Using Collaborative Language Systems to Engage High-Risk Adolescent Fathers
    By Ciara Collins, Beth Russell

Facilitator: Jordan Arellanes 

Abstract(s)

Physiological Responses, Effortful Control, and Adjustment in Latino Youth

By Zoe Taylor, Blake Jones, Nayantara Nair, Evich Carly

Latino youth are a vulnerable population who are at risk of maladjustment due to chronic stressors. However, healthy cortisol patterns may reflect a capacity for resilience against adversity. In a sample of Midwestern Latino youths (N = 119), we assessed whether the Cortisol Awakening Response (CAR) promoted self-regulation (effortful control), and in turn lower levels of maladjustment (depressive symptoms, aggression/frustration). We found that children’s CAR positively predicted effortful control, but parent CAR did not. Mother’s CAR marginally predicted youth’s depressive symptoms. Effortful control was negatively associated with youth depressive symptoms and aggression/frustration. Indirect effects through effortful control were also significant.

Objectives

Objective 1: To assess whether youths’ healthy cortisol response as reflected by a high cortisol awakening response, CAR, promotes positive self-regulation, as measured by effortful control). Objective 2: To assess whether effortful control mediates the relations between CAR responses and levels of maladjustment (depressive symptoms and aggression/frustration). Objective 3: To examine the effects of parent CAR on children’s CAR as well as on children’s effortful control and adjustment.

Patterns of Racial Discrimination among Black Parent-Adolescent Dyads

By Sharde' McNeil Smith

Despite considerable documentation of the negative effects of racial discrimination (RD) on individual mental health, less is known about patterns of RD in the parent-adolescent context.  Using data from 401 Black parent-adolescent dyads, this study examines (1) subgroups based on racial discrimination experiences and (2) differences between subgroups across psychological distress and social support (i.e., family and peer) outcomes.  Three subgroups were identified. Findings demonstrate higher levels of psychological distress for subgroups experiencing RD compared to the subgroup that did not experience RD.  Also, variations in social support existed between the Parent-adolescent RD subgroup and Adolescent-only RD subgroup.

Objectives

1.To identify subgroups of Black parent-adolescent dyads based on racial discrimination experiences. 2. To highlight the heterogeneity of racial discrimination experiences within Black families. 3. To demonstrate variations in social support and mental health outcomes across subgroups of Black parent-adolescent dyads.

Family Dynamics and Early Academic Outcomes Among Children of Teen Mothers: Everyday Conflict and Coparental Conflict

By Diamond Y. Bravo, Adriana J. Umaña-Taylor, Kimberly A. Updegraff, Laudan B. Jahromi, Chelsea L. Derlan

The current longitudinal study examined how everyday conflict between adolescents and their mother figures was associated with coparenting conflict, one year postpartum. Analysis revealed that adolescents’ reports of everyday conflict with mothers were positively associated with adolescent-mother coparental conflict reported by both dyad members. In turn, coparental conflict was positively associated with children’s academic maladjustment. Mediation tests indicated that adolescents’ reports of everyday conflict indirectly predicted children’s intellectual scoring on applied problems, passage comprehension, and picture vocabulary via adolescent-mother coparental conflict. Findings advance understandings of complex associations between family conflict and children’s academic adjustment with an at-risk underrepresented population.  

Objectives

(1) To examine the effects of daily conflict, reported by adolescent mothers and mother figures, on co-parental conflict. (2) To understand links between co-parenting conflict and children’s’ academic adjustment. (3) To examine the indirect link between everyday conflict and children’s academic adjustment outcomes via co-parenting conflict.

Using Collaborative Language Systems to Engage High-Risk Adolescent Fathers

By Ciara Collins, Beth Russell

There is very little research on how to effectively engage high-risk adolescent fathers in parenting programs. The current proposal uses a subset of semi-structured interviews conducted with fathers after their participation in a fatherhood program. The program aimed at improving fathers’ relationships with their children, improving communication with the children’s mother, and preventing future unwanted pregnancies. Using a case study approach, the current proposal applies the family therapy theory of Collaborative Language Systems (CLS) to a subset of interviews, specifically looking at the importance of the relationship between fathers and service providers in effecting positive outcomes.

Objectives

1. Explain main tenets of Collaborative Language Systems (CLS) 2. Use CLS tenets to explain effective engagement of high-risk minority fathers 3. Propose recommendations for implementing CLS in providers’ training across curricula

Bundle name
Conference Session