Expanding Theory, Measurement and Contents for Understanding Violence and Empowerment

Concurrent Sessions 3

Kendall Coffman, Jason Hans, Kimberly Crossman, Angela Whittaker, Jennifer Hardesty, Jaclyn Theisen, Sarah Taylor, Andrea Roach, Ashley Ermer, Marilyn Coleman, Lawrence Ganong, Heather Ryan, Eric Goodcase, Chelsea Spencer, Michelle Toews; Facilitator: Kathleen Hlavaty

3:30 PM
4:45 PM
Location
Salon 15
Session #
146
Session Type
Paper
Session Focus
  • Research
Organized By
  • Feminism & Family Studies

About the Session

  • 146-01 - EMPOWERMENT OR EXPLOITATION: COMPETING FEMINST PARADIGMS ON PORNOGRAPHY
    By Kendall Coffman, Jason Hans
  • 146-02 - Women’s Experience with Battering Scale – What Does it Really Measure?
    By Kimberly Crossman, Angela Whittaker, Jennifer Hardesty, Jaclyn Theisen
  • 146-03 - Intimate Partner Violence through Informational and Communication Technologies: A Systematic Review
    By Sarah Taylor
  • 146-04 - Attitudes of Intimate Partner Violence and Alcohol Consumption
    By Andrea Roach, Ashley Ermer, Marilyn Coleman, Lawrence Ganong, Heather Ryan
  • 146-05 - Campus Culture and Attitudes Regarding Sexual Assault and Bystander Behavior
    By Eric Goodcase, Chelsea Spencer, Michelle Toews

Facilitator: Kathleen Hlavaty

Abstract(s)

EMPOWERMENT OR EXPLOITATION: COMPETING FEMINST PARADIGMS ON PORNOGRAPHY

By Kendall Coffman, Jason Hans

  The purpose of this study was to examine how the intersection of gender scripts, gender identity, and sexual orientation impact perceived narratives and power hierarchies in sexual relationships. A simple random sample of 1,355 college students was recruited from a Southern land-grant university to take part in this study. The findings from this study suggest that feminists on this college campus have ambivalent attitudes towards the exploitation or empowerment of women in pornography. It was also evident that men only declined in their average perceived appropriateness during the male-male gender dyad of the vignette, which may indicate internalized homophobia.

Objectives

(1) Ti examine how the intersection of gender scripts, gender identity, and sexual orientation impact perceived narratives and power hierarchies in sexual relationships. (2) To gauge the campus’s feminist climate regarding self-identified feminists’ views on the exploitation and/or the empowerment of women within pornography. (3) To assess internalized homophobia within different stigmatizing sexual scenarios.

Women’s Experience with Battering Scale – What Does it Really Measure?

By Kimberly Crossman, Angela Whittaker, Jennifer Hardesty, Jaclyn Theisen

The Women's Experience with Battering (WEB) scale is a screener for violence. We examine the validity of the WEB by 1) comparing it to violence classification approaches and 2) exploring alternative constructs identified in narrative reports on the measure. 135 divorcing women completed the WEB scale, subscales of the Revised Conflict Tactics Scale, and the Psychological Maltreatment of Women Inventory. Preliminary analyses suggest that the WEB captures myriad experiences of violence/coercive control in addition to experiences of divorce not traditionally defined as battering. Findings highlight challenges and opportunities for the utility of the measure.

Objectives

1. Evaluate the effectiveness of the Women’s Experience with Battering (WEB) scale in identifying abused versus nonabused women. 2. Examine alternative underlying constructs measured by the WEB. 3. Discuss the challenges and opportunities regarding the WEB's usability in research and practice.

Intimate Partner Violence through Informational and Communication Technologies: A Systematic Review

By Sarah Taylor

With recent technological advances, intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetrated through information and communication technologies (ICT) has become problematic. Research on IPV perpetrated through ICTs has increased within the last decade, suggesting the need for a review of this research. The purpose of this systematic review is to explore study methodologies, including conceptualizations (e.g., definitions) and measurements (e.g., validated instruments), as well as major themes discovered in the research to provide direction for future work. Implications based on findings are presented for future research on this topic.    

Objectives

To assess the current research on intimate partner violence perpetrated through information and communication technologies To analyze the methodologies and themes in the current research on intimate partner violence perpetrated through information and communication technologies To provide recommendations for future research on intimate partner violence perpetrated through information and communication technologies

Attitudes of Intimate Partner Violence and Alcohol Consumption

By Andrea Roach, Ashley Ermer, Marilyn Coleman, Lawrence Ganong, Heather Ryan

This study explores how a perpetrator's gender, severity of violence, and alcohol consumption impact attitudes about intimate partner violence (IPV) and forgiveness. Multiple segment factorial vignettes were used to gather quantitative data from forced-choice answers and qualitative data from written responses. Multinomial logistic regressions indicated significant differences between gender of the perpetrator, severity of violence, and amount of alcohol consumed. The qualitative data produced themes including ‘never' use violence in relationships, alcohol is ‘no excuse', and a violent partner should be given a ‘second chance.' Understanding attitudes about IPV may provide insight into how meanings regarding IPV are constructed.      

Objectives

1. To assess whether gender of the perpetrator, level of violence, and amount of alcohol consumed affect attitudes about the use of violence in an intimate relationship. 2. To assess whether gender of the perpetrator, level of violence, and amount of alcohol consumed affect attitudes about whether or not a victim of IPV should forgive the perpetrator? 3. To analyze attitudes about the gender of the perpetrator, level of violence, and amount of alcohol consumed in the context of intimate partner violence.

Campus Culture and Attitudes Regarding Sexual Assault and Bystander Behavior

By Eric Goodcase, Chelsea Spencer, Michelle Toews; Facilitator: Kathleen Hlavaty

The purpose of this study was to examine how perceptions of campus climate related to sexual assault were associated with attitudes about sexual assault and bystander behavior in a sample of 853 U.S. university students. Preliminary results indicate that campus climate was negatively associated with sexual assault perpetration attitudes and negatively associated with intent to engage in bystander intervention behavior. Readiness to promote change on campus regarding sexual assault was positively related to bystander intervention behavior. This suggests that educational programs promoting a safe climate culture regarding sexual assault and address bystander interventions may decrease sexual assaults at universities.

Objectives

1. To analyze the relationship between one's perception of their college campus' climate related to sexual assault and their attitudes related to sexual assault perpetration. 2. To analyze the relationship between one's perception of their college campus' climate related to sexual assault and their intent to engage in bystander intervention behavior. 3. To demonstrate the need for sexual assault education that promotes a safe campus and bystander intervention

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