Experiences of Stress and Approaches for Family Coping

Concurrent Sessions 11

Shu Su, Kim Gregson, Alyssa McElwain, Mallory Lucier-Greer, Ross May, Davina Quichocho, Gregory S. Seibert, Frank Fincham, Amanda Moser, Sharon Ballard, Katie Reck, Holly Tiret, Veronica Quintino, Georgina Perry, Charlye Meuser, Veronica Quintino-Aranda, Charlye Meuser; Facilitator: Kaylee R. Seddio

11:00 AM
12:15 PM
Location
Salon 2
Session #
408
Session Type
Lightning Paper
Session Focus
  • Research
  • Practice
Organized By
  • Education & Enrichment

About the Session

  • 408-01 - Coping with Social Stress: Like Parent Like Adolescent
    By Shu Su, Kim Gregson, Alyssa McElwain
  • 408-02 - Posttraumatic Stress, Self-Control, & Adverse Outcomes in Emerging Adults
    By Mallory Lucier-Greer, Ross May, Davina Quichocho, Gregory S. Seibert, Frank Fincham
  • 408-03 - Rape Myth Acceptance among University Students
    By Amanda Moser, Sharon Ballard
  • 408-04 - RELAX Alternatives to Anger: Examining the benefits of Latino participation in an Anger Management Education program
    By Katie Reck, Holly Tiret, Veronica Quintino, Georgina Perry, Charlye Meuser
  • 408-05 - The Intentional Translation of RELAX Alternatives to Anger from English to Spanish
    By Holly Tiret, Katie Reck, Georgina Perry, Veronica Quintino-Aranda, Charlye Meuser

Facilitator: Kaylee R. Seddio

Abstract(s)

Coping with Social Stress: Like Parent Like Adolescent

By Shu Su, Kim Gregson, Alyssa McElwain

Managing peer stressors can be critical for youths' adaptive development in adolescence. Based on social learning theory, children may learn how to cope with social stress via parental modeling of various coping strategies. This study examines associations linking parental coping behaviors (support-seeking or denial) in response to social challenges with youths' social stress coping behaviors (problem-focus, support-receptivity, social approach). Results indicate that adolescents may mimic their parent's social stress coping strategies. Parent educators can support parents in using more support-seeking and less denial coping, since youth may model these approaches to their own peer stressors.

Objectives

(1) To indicate the possible benefits of parent education on youth’s development. (2) To analyze youth’s social stress coping style from social learning perspective. (3) To demonstrate that children learn how to cope with social stress via parental modeling of coping strategies.

Posttraumatic Stress, Self-Control, & Adverse Outcomes in Emerging Adults

By Mallory Lucier-Greer, Ross May, Davina Quichocho, Gregory S. Seibert, Frank Fincham

Informed by a stress process framework, this study investigated the relation of posttraumatic stress to risky drinking, depressive symptoms and school burnout in emerging adulthood, a developmental period during which common Behavioral and psychological disorders reach their peak. Whether self-control acts as a mechanism linking posttraumatic stress to these outcomes was also examined. Using short-term longitudinal data from undergraduate college students (n=373), we found that self-control partially mediated the association between posttraumatic stress and depressive symptoms and school burnout and fully mediated the association with risky drinking. Implications for Family life Educators and those serving college students are discussed.

Objectives

1. Attendees will understand that posttraumatic stress places emerging adults at risk for adverse outcomes in diverse areas of functioning. 2. Attendees will correctly identify emerging adult as a developmental period of identity exploration in which new behaviors are explored and in which common Behavioral and psychological disorders reach their peak. 3. Attendees will acknowledge that they will be better service providers if they are equipped with a foundational knowledge of trauma-informed care and will be able to identify a brief self-report assessment of posttraumatic distress to assist them in their work.

Rape Myth Acceptance among University Students

By Amanda Moser, Sharon Ballard

This study used an ecological perspective to explore rape myth acceptance (RMA) among university students. A convenience sample (N=549) completed The Rape Supportive Attitude Scale (α = .90) and a demographic survey using an online survey tool.  A majority of participants were white, female, did not identify as LGBT, were not student athletes, nor were part of Greek Life. Results showed that females had lower RMA than males and those who knew someone who had been raped (60%) had lower RMA than those that didn’t know anyone who had been raped. Additionally, older students had lower RMA than younger students.

Objectives

1) Increase understanding of rape myth acceptance among university students 2) Illustrate differences in rape myth acceptance based on various demographics 3) Provide implications for future research and practice

RELAX Alternatives to Anger: Examining the benefits of Latino participation in an Anger Management Education program.

By Katie Reck, Holly Tiret, Veronica Quintino, Georgina Perry, Charlye Meuser

Evidence from anger management programming demonstrates positive emotional and Behavioral impacts on participants. This study examines the benefits among Spanish-speaking, Latino participants who completed the RELAX: Alternatives to Anger program. Using focus group data from 36 RELAX participants, eight major themes related to the benefits of the program participation included: (1) learned anger management strategies, (2) getting to know oneself, (3) improved family life, (4) increased social and cultural support, (5) defined personal anger, (6) gained awareness of resources, (7) teaching others, and (8) having less stress. Implications for future programming is discussed.

Objectives

1 - To qualitatively examine the experiences of Latino participants in the RELAX:Alternative to Anger program. 2 - To describe the benefits of program participation among Latino participants in the RELAX:Alternative to Anger program. 3 - To provide suggestions for future FLE implementation of anger management programming to Latino audiences.

The Intentional Translation of RELAX Alternatives to Anger from English to Spanish

By Holly Tiret, Katie Reck, Georgina Perry, Veronica Quintino-Aranda, Charlye Meuser; acilitator: Kaylee R. Seddio

This study examines one method of intentional translation of an award winning, peer reviewed anger management program from English to Spanish. Factors discussed will include the program in its present form, including background, delivery method, content, language and context. Feedback from primarily Spanish speaking focus groups helped determine how best to refine and enhance the curriculum to make it more culturally competent and relevant.

Objectives

1. To demonstrate a method of intentional translation of a family program. 2. To discuss the current version of a family program before translation. 3. To review feedback from focus groups from the target population regarding cultural relevance.

Bundle name
Conference Session