Feminism and Family Studies Section Member Meeting

Featuring Roundtable Presentations

Kari Morgan, Elizabeth Holman, Jasmine Routon, Ramona Faith Oswald, Michelle Toews, Chelsey Spencer, Loren Taylor, Melanie L. Duncan

11:30 AM
1:00 PM
Location
Salon 10
Session #
134
Session Type
Section Meeting
Session Focus
  • Research
  • Practice
Organized By
  • Feminism & Family Studies

About the Session

  • 134-01 - Revisiting Feminist Teaching Practices for Today’s Undergraduate Classroom
    By Kari Morgan
  • 134-02 - Addressing Real-time Political Changes in Teaching Social Justice
    By Elizabeth Holman
  • 134-03 - Community capacity for LGBT-parent families living in nonmetropolitan communities
    By Jasmine Routon, Ramona Faith Oswald
  • 134-04 - The Role of Campus Environment on Bystander Intentions and Behaviors
    By Michelle Toews, Chelsey Spencer, Loren Taylor
  • 134-05 - Families’ Participation in Activism: Causes, Motivations, and Responses
    By Melanie L. Duncan

(Made possible with the support of the Feminism and Family Studies Section.)

Abstract(s)

Presider: Tara Saathoff-Wells, Section Chair

All attendees are welcome to attend the member meetings of NCFR Sections. These are opportunities for you to become more involved with NCFR and the Sections that match your areas of interest.

Revisiting Feminist Teaching Practices for Today’s Undergraduate Classroom

By Kari Morgan

This roundtable will provide participants with an opportunity to revisit or be introduced to the essential tenets of feminist family science pedagogy as published in the literature in the late 1980's and early 1990's. These concepts include, but are not limited to: Connectedness, power, high expectations for ourselves; equality and diversity; and "real world" issues (teaching large classes, tenure, campus climate). I assert that the concepts discussed in these articles serve as the foundation for the field of feminist family science pedagogy. Although these concepts are critical at the graduate and undergraduate level, this conversation will focus on undergraduate education.

Objectives

1) Participants will be introduced to the “legacy” literature on feminist family science pedagogy. 2) Participants will be provided with an opportunity to share personal experiences and solutions related to feminist family science pedagogy in the undergraduate classroom. The facilitator will provide conversation prompts, but will also be willing to accommodate specific topics of interest that participants may bring to the roundtable. 3) Participants will be invited to reflect on the current state of scholarship related to feminist family science pedagogy.

Addressing Real-time Political Changes in Teaching Social Justice

By Elizabeth Holman

The shifting political landscape affects diverse families in their day-to-day lives. It can also provide family scholars and educators up-to-date teaching examples to use in the classroom when discussing social justice issues, privilege, and oppression. However, it can be difficult to moderate a critical analysis of current events and policy changes with students without the conversation devolving into a heated political debate. This can be especially challenging for professors in marginalized social positions, who personally feel personally oppressed outside the classroom. This Praxis Roundtable would be helpful to discuss and share strategies for integrating real-time political changes into classroom lessons.

Objectives

To discuss best teaching practices that address current events and political changes with students To understand the role of self-disclosure in the classroom when addressing social justice issues To develop strategies for teaching praxis that best address social justice, privilege, and oppression

Community capacity for LGBT-parent families living in nonmetropolitan communities

By Jasmine Routon, Ramona Faith Oswald

 This study uses a community capacity framework informed by intersectional feminist theory to identify needs specific to LGBT-parent families, understand how those needs are addressed by the broader community, and propose ways in which communities can be more responsive to them. Five stakeholders who represent various community institutions were interviewed to provide a broad understanding of existing community capacity around LGBT issues. Preliminary analyses reveal three main needs: a reduction of stigma, greater community ownership of LGBT issues, and increased access to resources. Capacity was observed to be dependent upon individual catalysts rather than community-wide concern.

Objectives

• To establish community capacity as an emerging lens for building LGBT family support • To present preliminary findings from community stakeholders regarding how their organization supports LGBT families • To discuss next steps for conducting a comparative analysis to further elucidates how capacity can be built and sustained

The Role of Campus Environment on Bystander Intentions and Behaviors

By Michelle Toews, Chelsey Spencer, Loren Taylor

The purpose of this study was to examine campus environment factors as predictors of bystander intentions and behaviors among 274 students. We found that, when faced with a situation they believed was, or could have led to, a sexual assault, 21.5% did nothing, 9.5% observed and waited to see if they needed to intervene, and 69% intervened. The only variable associated with students' decisions to act/intervene was their intent to intervene. None of the variables were associated with students' decisions to watch and wait. Furthermore, perceived peer norms was the only variable associated with students' intent to intervene.

Objectives

1. To determine how college students respond to a perceived sexual assault. 2. To examine what campus environment factors predict bystander intentions and behaviors. 3. To explore implications for research and practice.

Families’ Participation in Activism: Causes, Motivations, and Responses

By Melanie L. Duncan

Recent social and political events in the U.S. have highlighted the participation of families (e.g. multiple generations, siblings, or self-identified families) engaging in political activism together or simultaneously around the nation. Previous research has focused on individual activists and their motivations for participating in collective behavior. It is important to understand the perspective of these families, their motivations for participation, what it means for them to participate in activism together, and future plans with regards to activism. This study seeks to answer these questions by interviewing families who have engaged in activism together since January 2016.

Objectives

1. To explore the motivations for why families have chosen to engage in activism together. 2. To explore the causes that these families have engaged in activism on behalf of and the intersections this has with their personal lives. 3. To assess differences in family types (e.g. multi-generational or sibling groups) who engage in activism.

Bundle name
Conference Session