The Impacts of Neighborhoods

Concurrent Sessions 6

Henry Gonzalez, Dawn Witherspoon, Saskia Boggs, Ashley McDonald, Sakshi Bhargava, Mayra Bamaca, Marinda Harrell-Levy, Rodney Harrell, Tiffany L. Brown, David T. Lardier, Jr., Autumn M. Bermea, Pauline Garcia-Reid, Robert J. Reid; Facilitator: Debra Berke

1:45 PM
3:00 PM
Location
Salon 15
Session #
231
Session Type
Paper
Session Focus
  • Research
Organized By
  • Ethnic Minorities

About the Session

  • 231-01 - Neighborhood Conditions and Child Behavioral Adjustment in Latino Families
    By Henry Gonzalez
  • 231-02 - Contextualized Parenting: Black and Latino Parents in Urban Neighborhoods
    By Dawn Witherspoon, Saskia Boggs, Ashley McDonald, Sakshi Bhargava, Mayra Bamaca
  • 231-03 - Understanding Modern Segregation: Traumatic Racial Experiences and Other Factors Supporting African American Preferences for Majority-Black Neighborhoods
    By Marinda Harrell-Levy, Rodney Harrell
  • 231-04 - Examining community trauma from the perspectives of Black and Latino youth
    By Tiffany L. Brown, David T. Lardier, Jr., Autumn M. Bermea, Pauline Garcia-Reid, Robert J. Reid

Facilitator: Debra Berke

Abstract(s)

Neighborhood Conditions and Child Behavioral Adjustment in Latino Families

By Henry Gonzalez

Empirical work on the mechanisms through which neighborhoods influence child adjustment, especially among Latinos, is lacking. In particular, extant research rarely goes beyond census data to examine individual-, family-, and neighborhood-level processes. Therefore, the purposes of this study were to extend our current understanding of the influence of neighborhood conditions on children’s Behavioral adjustment among Latino families. Findings showed that although children living in disorderly neighborhoods were reported to exhibit disproportionately high behavior problems, in some cases a positive family climate may help model adaptive behavior for children even when maladaptive behavior is being modeled outside the doorstep.

Objectives

A) Extend our current understanding of the influence of neighborhood conditions on children’s Behavioral adjustment among Latino families. B) Identify the role of family relationship quality as a potential key prevention tool to strengthen child developmental outcomes among Latino children and youth living in risky neighborhoods. C) Inform practitioners and neighborhood services working in predominantly Latino and Latino immigrant barrios or enclaves about untapped levers of intervention and strengths among Latino families with children.

Contextualized Parenting: Black and Latino Parents in Urban Neighborhoods

By Dawn Witherspoon, Saskia Boggs, Ashley McDonald, Sakshi Bhargava, Mayra Bamaca

Neighborhoods are a salient context for parenting, yet limited scholarship exists that examines contextualized parenting. In urban neighborhoods, parents may engage in specific strategies to monitor youth and safeguard them from dangers of urban living. With U.S. neighborhoods experiencing demographic shifts; many Latino families are settling in new immigrant destinations that are predominantly Black. These areas are understudied. This study uses a mixed-method approach to examine neighborhood-parenting links among Black and Latino caregivers in an urban, new destination area. Findings indicated differential associations between neighborhood characteristics and parental monitoring for Black and Latino families; qualitative analyses clarify the associations.

Objectives

Objective 1: To contextualize the experience of parenting as shaped by neighborhoods and peer contexts. Objective 2: To determine similarities and differences in how parenting is shaped by the neighborhood context for Black and Latino parents. Objective 3: To demonstrate the importance of examining contextual influences in parenting and provide knowledge that can enhance understanding of how parenting is context specific.

Understanding Modern Segregation: Traumatic Racial Experiences and Other Factors Supporting African American Preferences for Majority-Black Neighborhoods

By Marinda Harrell-Levy, Rodney Harrell

The present study looks specifically at homeowners of 50 Black middle class households to explore why middle-class African Americans who live in African American neighborhoods live where they do. We focus on majority black Prince George’s County, Maryland because of its distinction as a racially homogeneous middle-class African-American enclave as opposed to an involuntary ghetto. Both qualitative and quantitative approaches were adopted and combined sequentially in a multiple case study design. Analysis revealed that explanations for the purposeful choice to live in a majority Black community varied but many participants were motivated by racial fear and/or traumatic racial experiences.

Objectives

(1) To evaluate differences between African American homeowners who do and do not find advantages to racially concentrated neighborhoods and communities. (2) To take a more nuanced view of racially concentrated areas to analyze the modern day implications of racial separatism (3) To focus attention on the perceptions held by African American middle class families, a group often ignored in research, as well as what their perceptions reveal about the relevance of race in modern day society

Examining community trauma from the perspectives of Black and Latino youth

By Tiffany L. Brown, David T. Lardier, Jr., Autumn M. Bermea, Pauline Garcia-Reid, Robert J. Reid

The purpose of this study was to identify indicators of community trauma within the narratives of Black and Latino adolescents living in an urban community with chronic stressors. Results uncovered three broad themes indicative of the participants’ experiences with community trauma. The findings also provided insight into two pathways that young people use to cope with these experiences, including substance use and high levels of individualism. Implications for practice include developing interventions that address the loss that youth have experienced as a result of community trauma.  

Objectives

1. To examine experiences of community trauma in Black and Latino youth living in an urban community with chronic stressors. 2. To understand the coping pathways that adolescents use to navigate experiences related to community trauma 3. To inform community-level indigenous-based healing programs on how to meet the needs of youth living in neighborhoods impacted by community trauma.

Bundle name
Conference Session