Issues in Aging

Concurrent Sessions 9

Amber Seidel, Karl Majeske, Courtney Polenick, Kira Birditt, Karen Fingerman, Erin Yelland, Jacquelyn Benson, James Bates, Kristin Litzelman, M. Hunter Stanfield, Jennifer Pearce-Morris, Loriena Yancura, Christine Fruhauf, Nathaniel Riggs, Nancy Mendoza, Heather Greenwood; Facilitator: Brianna Routh

1:45 PM
3:00 PM
Location
Salon 11
Session #
334
Session Type
Paper
Session Focus
  • Research
  • Practice
Organized By
  • Families & Health

About the Session

  • 334-01 - Middle-Aged Children and Their Support of Aging Parents
    By Amber Seidel, Karl Majeske, Courtney Polenick, Kira Birditt, Karen Fingerman
  • 334-02 - Aging-Related Priorities in the North Central Region: A Needs Assessment
    By Erin Yelland, Jacquelyn Benson, James Bates, Kristin Litzelman, M. Hunter Stanfield
  • 334-03 - Aging, Hearing Impairment, and the Role of Spousal and Partner Support
    By Jennifer Pearce-Morris
  • 334-04 - Development of a Curriculum for Children in Grandparent-headed Families
    By Loriena Yancura, Christine Fruhauf, Nathaniel Riggs, Nancy Mendoza, Heather Greenwood

Facilitator: Brianna Routh

Abstract(s)

Middle-Aged Children and Their Support of Aging Parents

By Amber Seidel, Karl Majeske, Courtney Polenick, Kira Birditt, Karen Fingerman

Using data from the Family Exchanges Study, we examined support exchanges, stress, and worry between middle-aged children and aging parents (N = 254) with both parties' perceptions of parental physical health. Findings suggest that children worrying and parents receiving support were associated with poorer parental health. In post hoc analyses stratified by overestimating, matching, and underestimating parental health, children worrying remained significant for over-estimators and those who matched. However, offspring reports of support exchanges were associated with parental health for those who overestimated, and parental reports of support were significant for those who matched. No associations remained significant for under-estimators.

Objectives

1. To examine support exchanges between middle-aged children and their parents. 2. To understand factors that affect adult children's perception of parental health. 3. To explore parent-child interactions across the life span.

Aging-Related Priorities in the North Central Region: A Needs Assessment

By Erin Yelland, Jacquelyn Benson, James Bates, Kristin Litzelman, M. Hunter Stanfield

We conducted a needs assessment through Extension programs in a 12-state region to understand aging-related needs sparked by the demographic shift of aging. Findings suggest that healthy aging and finances are priority topics, and access to aging-related services, estate and succession planning, and access to healthy and nutritious foods were topic trends. While some programming exists in these areas, there is a need for understanding how these programs are implemented and where gaps remain. These results will begin to establish the evidence-base for future aging-related Extension work and can influence priorities of non-Extension professionals who work with aging populations.

Objectives

1. To understand the current aging-related priorities across the North Central Extension Region. 2. To understand the status of aging-related Extension programming across the North Central Extension Region. 3. To interpret how family living and Extension professionals can better address the needs of an aging population.

Aging, Hearing Impairment, and the Role of Spousal and Partner Support

By Jennifer Pearce-Morris

Hearing impairment is often experienced by older adults during the aging process. Although many studies find that hearing impairment is associated with poorer psychosocial health, fewer studies have examined how family members, especially significant others, can help reduce these negative effects. The current study finds that support from various types of family members, spouses and romantic partners in particular, is helpful for those experiencing hearing loss. Being able to open up to a spouse or partner to discuss one's worries, and being able to rely on a spouse or partner for help, are both important for how someone perceives support.

Objectives

(1) To examine whether support from different types of family members reduces negative psychosocial effects of age-related hearing loss on older adults (2) To analyze whether support from spouses and romantic partners reduces the effects of age-related hearing loss more-so than support from other types of family members (3) To identify specific aspects of support that older adults find helpful

Development of a Curriculum for Children in Grandparent-headed Families

By Loriena Yancura, Christine Fruhauf, Nathaniel Riggs, Nancy Mendoza, Heather Greenwood

This presentation describes the process of developing a social-emotional and leadership skill-building curriculum children aged 9-14 years and being raised by their grandparents.   The curriculum is part of GRANDcares, an intervention to foster resilience in grandfamiles.  Development included setting criteria for the curriculum, review of potential programs, and identification of weekly and overall structure.  The complete curriculum is summarized. This knowledge will be useful to individuals who work with grandfamiles and those interested in social-emotional curriculum development for specialized populations.

Objectives

To communicate unique needs of custodial grandparents and the children they are raising. To describe the development of a strengths-based intervention program for grandchildren being raised by their grandparents. To demonstrate the need for intergenerational level interventions.

Downloads

334-01 - Middle-Aged Children and Their Support of Aging Parents

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