Military Service and Its Impact on Family Functioning

Concurrent Sessions 6

Catherine O'Neal, Jay Mancini, Jessie Rudi, Dave DeGarmo, Kate Gliske, Abi Gewirtz, Kayla Reed, Mallory Lucier-Greer, J. Kale Monk, Lauren Ruhlmann, Briana Nelson Goff, Brian Ogolsky; Facilitator: Kaylee R. Seddio

1:45 PM
3:00 PM
Location
Salon 11
Session #
228
Session Type
Paper
Session Focus
  • Research
  • Practice
Organized By
  • Education & Enrichment

About the Session

  • 228-01 - Are Parents’ Community Connections Related to Their Adolescents’ Well-being?: An Examination of Military Families
    By Catherine O'Neal, Jay Mancini
  • 228-02 - Whose Support Matters in Military Families? Parental Social Support and Parenting
    By Jessie Rudi, Dave DeGarmo, Kate Gliske, Abi Gewirtz
  • 228-03 - Performance, Mental Health, and Unit Cohesion Among Combat-exposed Soldiers
    By Kayla Reed, Mallory Lucier-Greer
  • 228-04 - Systemic Relationship and Psycho-education Programs for Military Couples
    By J. Kale Monk, Lauren Ruhlmann, Briana Nelson Goff, Brian Ogolsky

Facilitator: Kaylee R. Seddio

Abstract(s)

Are Parents’ Community Connections Related to Their Adolescents’ Well-being?: An Examination of Military Families

By Catherine O'Neal, Jay Mancini

Drawing from the Social Organization Theory of Action and Change, the current study assesses associations between parents' community connections, their resilient coping abilities, and adolescent outcomes of mental health, psychosocial well-being, and quality family relationships using a sample of 266 military families with one active duty parent and one civilian parent. The role of the military context for child outcomes was also examined. Findings support the model as parents' community connections were related to their resilient coping, and resilient coping of civilian parents was relevant for adolescent's well-being. Results will be discussed with an emphasis on intervention/prevention, and policy implications.

Objectives

1. To examine the community connections available to AD and civilian partners in military families. 2. To identify how parents’ community connections and resilient coping abilities are related to their adolescent offspring’s mental health, psychosocial well-being and quality family relationships. 3. To demonstrate how study findings inform prevention, intervention, and policy work related to military families and the well-being of youth within these families.

Whose Support Matters in Military Families? Parental Social Support and Parenting

By Jessie Rudi, Dave DeGarmo, Kate Gliske, Abi Gewirtz

Research shows that social support can buffer against negative impacts of stressful life situations and can promote effective parenting. While parental social support has been studied largely in at-risk and single-parent populations, no study has examined effects of parental support in post-deployed military families. The current study tested the association between parental social support and parenting practices in post-deployed military families (593 parents from 333 families). Analyses were conducted separately for mothers and fathers, and support providers. Results revealed Friend Support was positively associated with positive parenting among fathers, and Relative Support was positively associated with positive parenting among mothers.

Objectives

1. Examine associations between source of parental social support and parenting practices among post-deployed military families. 2. Understand how different sources of social support impact parenting differently for mothers and fathers. 3. Apply social support and coping theory to parenting in post-deployed military families.

Performance, Mental Health, and Unit Cohesion Among Combat-exposed Soldiers

By Kayla Reed, Mallory Lucier-Greer

This study utilized a self-determination theoretical framework and stress-process perspective to examine how hostile deployment experiences impact military performance and mental health.  Unit cohesion moderated the relationships to assess the role of social support. A structural equation model was fit with a sample of young soldiers (ages 18-25) from the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience among Servicemembers (N=5,284). Results indicate that high levels of unit cohesion can buffer the detrimental impact of hostile deployment experiences on soldiers’ performance and mental health. Discussion regarding the importance of a supportive work environment and implications for family life educators are included.

Objectives

1) To evaluate the role of hostile deployment experiences in soldier performance and mental health. 2) To assess the influence of unit cohesion on the impact of hostile deployment experiences on soldier performance and mental health. 3) To analyze soldier deployment experiences, performance, and mental health from a self-determination theoretical framework and stress process perspective.

Systemic Relationship and Psycho-education Programs for Military Couples

By J. Kale Monk, Lauren Ruhlmann, Briana Nelson Goff, Brian Ogolsky; Facilitator: Kaylee R. Seddio

Military veterans are among those at the greatest risk for mental health impairments. Often, their families also face hardships due to stressors associated with deployment, reintegration, and the interpersonal effects of trauma. Although some services are available, they often go underutilized and there are even fewer systems-oriented programs for couples and families. To address these gaps, we review existing brief-systemic educational programs, which show promise in attracting and helping military families in need. In addition to describing the theoretical underpinnings that support these models and the limited empirical evidence behind them, we will provide recommendations for family life educators.

Objectives

1. Participants will be able to identify the educational programming needs for military veteran families from the literature 2. Participants will gain insight into existing brief-systemic programs for military veteran families 3. Participants will be able to discuss future directions and implications for FLEs working with military veteran families

Bundle name
Conference Session