Next Generation Family Scientists Moving Us Forward Globally to Support Families Experiencing Trauma

Concurrent Sessions 1

Jordan St. Charles, Stephanie Armes, James Muruthi, Hugh Milroy, Jay Mancini, Holly Hatton-Bowers, Gilbert Parra, Rachel Thomas, Carrie Smalley, Kaylee Seddio, Wendy Middlemiss; Discussant and Facilitator: Deb Burke

8:30 AM
9:45 AM
Session #
108
Session Type
Symposium
Session Focus
  • Research
  • Practice
Organized By
  • Education & Enrichment

About the Session

  • 108-01 - Karen Educational Trajectory Framework
    By Jordan St. Charles
  • 108-02 - Homeless men in London: Relationship contexts and resilient vulnerability
    By Stephanie Armes, James Muruthi, Hugh Milroy, Jay Mancini
  • 108-03 - Ending the Game: A Survivor-Informed Curriculum for Victims of Sex Trafficking
    By Holly Hatton-Bowers, Gilbert Parra, Rachel Thomas, Carrie Smalley
  • 108-04 - Current Challenges for Children Living in Refugee Camps: Policy and Next Steps to Support Families
    By Kaylee Seddio, Wendy Middlemiss; Discussant and Facilitator: Deb Burke

Abstract(s)

Karen Educational Trajectory Framework

By Jordan St. Charles

As increasing numbers of immigrants and refugees enter the U.S. and the American school system, issues surrounding education become more complex. There is a lack of research addressing educational issues for refugee families, Karen families in particular. After a thorough review of the literature, a new theoretical framework was created to better understand the ways Karen families navigate the school system to create shared meanings with their children about the children's educational trajectories. The Karen Educational Trajectory framework integrates the concepts and assumptions of symbolic interactionism, life course theory, and systems theory. Implications for policy and educational practice are discussed.

Objectives

(1) To illustrate the literature gap surrounding the educational experiences of Karen families and the necessity of a new theoretical framework from the family perspective. (2) Outline the concepts and assumptions of the Karen Educational Trajectory framework. (3) Discuss implications for research, policy, and educational practice.

Homeless men in London: Relationship contexts and resilient vulnerability

By Stephanie Armes, James Muruthi, Hugh Milroy, Jay Mancini

Vulnerability and resilience go hand in hand in the lives of homeless men. While many scholars have described the stressors and challenges of homelessness, few studies have investigated nuances of the experience of homelessness. We explore the experience of homelessness for 37 male veterans in East London, focusing on challenges and strengths within their experiences. Factors of vulnerability and resilience are explored including family of origin, current family life, friend networks, and multiple contexts. Discussion centers on how service professionals can mitigate vulnerability and elevate resilience.

Objectives

1.To examine factors of vulnerability and resiliency in a population of male homeless veterans living in East London. 2.To apply the Contextual Model of Family Stress to experiences of loss. 3.To further understand how programmatic interventions can contribute to resilience in homeless veterans.

Ending the Game: A Survivor-Informed Curriculum for Victims of Sex Trafficking

By Holly Hatton-Bowers, Gilbert Parra, Rachel Thomas, Carrie Smalley

Many victims of sex trafficking experience some level of attachment to traffickers. One understudied and under-addressed reason for this attachment is the psychological coercive tactics that traffickers often use. One resource, a survivor-written coercion-resiliency curriculum, is being utilized in victim-serving facilities to address and minimize the effects of psychological coercion in trafficking. This study reports promising findings from a pilot project of the impacts of administering this curriculum among victims of sex trafficking in reducing psychological coercion and increasing self-worth outside “the life”. The findings provide valuable information that is useful for building supports and empowering victims of sex trafficking.    

Objectives

1) Understand the impact of psychological coercion in human trafficking and its role in victim recidivism, as well as key identifying characteristics of sex trafficking victims who have endured psychological coercion. 2) Describe a promising educational resource used for coercion resiliency among trafficking victims. 3) Describe research findings showing positive impacts on areas that are critical for recovery for trafficking victims.

Current Challenges for Children Living in Refugee Camps: Policy and Next Steps to Support Families

By Kaylee Seddio, Wendy Middlemiss; Discussant and Facilitator: Deb Burke