Relationship Education: Practical Educational Approaches

Concurrent Sessions 4

Scott Ketring, Tom Smith, Brandon Burr, Daniel Hubler, Marielle Jackson, Addison Elledge, Matthew Lefthand, David Schramm, Adam Galovan, Francesca Adler-Baeder; Facilitator: Adam M. Galovan

5:00 PM
6:15 PM
Location
Salon 11
Session #
152
Session Type
Paper
Session Focus
  • Research
  • Practice
Organized By
  • Education & Enrichment

About the Session

  • 152-02 - Relationship Education and Couples Therapy: Clarifying the Difference
  • By Brandon Burr, Daniel Hubler, Marielle Jackson, Addison Elledge, Matthew Lefthand
  • 152-03 - Way of Being and Character Strengths as a Foundation for Relationship Education
    By David Schramm, Adam Galovan
  • 152-04 - Couples Connecting Mindfully: An Innovative Relationship Education Program
    By Julianne McGill, Francesca Adler-Baeder

Facilitator: Adam M. Galovan

Abstract(s)

Initial Results From an RCT Study of Two Newly-developed Couples Education Programs

By Francesca Adler-Baeder, Julianne McGill, Christine Totura, Carlie Cave, Rachel Savasuk, Scott Ketring, Tom Smith; Facilitator: Adam Galovan

This study uses an experimental design to explore comparative patterns of change for 377 couples randomly assigned to one of two CRE programs or a control condition. Preliminary results indicate that for ethnically and economically diverse couples, participation in CRE yields significant treatment effects at immediate post-test on several key indicators of individual health and well-being, couple functioning, and family climate, regardless of curricula. Social address moderated effectiveness on two outcomes. Final analyses will include comparative trajectories of these measures up to 6 months after baseline and the exploration of the influence of program participants’ individual characteristics on program outcomes.

Objectives

1. Participants will understand the differences and similarities of the two CE programs tested. 2. Participants will understand the design and goals of the experimental study. 3. Participants will understand the initial impact of the programs documented over a 6-month period.

Relationship Education and Couples Therapy: Clarifying the Difference

By Brandon Burr, Daniel Hubler, Marielle Jackson, Addison Elledge, Matthew Lefthand

Growing evidence suggests that many do not see the difference between relationship education (RE) and couples therapy (CT). If the difference is not understood less people may be inclined to attend RE, and RE has experienced various recruitment challenges. For this study, an online module was created to teach the difference between RE and CT. Participants were randomly assigned to a treatment group, who received a pre-test, the module and the posttest, or a control group, who received the pre-test and posttest only. Results showed that the module had an effect on clarifying the difference between RE and CT.

Objectives

Participants will learn about literature on the confusion between relationship education and couples therapy. Participants will learn about how confusion about differences between relationship education and couples therapy may impact relationship education attitudes and attendance. Participants will learn about study results that speak to the effectiveness of an online module designed to teach the difference between relationship education and couples therapy.

Way of Being and Character Strengths as a Foundation for Relationship Education

By David Schramm, Adam Galovan

While great strides have been made regarding relationship and marriage education (RME) there is yet much to learn about the development and delivery of RME. Moving beyond traditional models of RME that focus primarily on skills, we analyzed data from a sample of 514 couples from the United States and Canada that center on way of being, virtues and positive actions. Results from SEMs indicate the strongest predictors of shared perceptions of relationship quality is bids for connection followed by husband and wife way of being and relationship virtues. Future RME programs should balance skills with character strengths and virtues.

Objectives

Increased understanding of importance of virtues in relationship and marriage education. Increased understanding of the role of way of being in relationship and marriage education. Increased understanding of the difference between prescriptions and principles in relationship and marriage education.

Couples Connecting Mindfully: An Innovative Relationship Education Program

By Julianne McGill, Francesca Adler-Baeder; Facilitator: Adam M. Galovan

This study is an initial impact evaluation of a mindfulness-based couple relationship education program, Couples Connecting Mindfully. The research-informed program integrates mindfulness practices, which are linked to physical, mental, and relational health, into traditional CRE class material. Using a randomized control design we tested the efficacy of CCM for couples' individual and couple functioning and preliminary results indicate immediate improvements. Results related to theory of change indicate levels of change in stress predicted concurrent change in relationship quality. Final analyses will include treatment effects of CCM and the spillover effect of changes in stress to couple dynamics over six months.

Objectives

1) To evaluate the efficacy of the Couples Connecting Mindfully program. 2) To assess mechanisms of change in Couples Connecting Mindfully 3) To utilize research methods for dyadic data in evaluation research

Bundle name
Conference Session