Religion/Spirituality and Marital Relationships

Concurrent Sessions 5

Woosang Hwang, Ayse Cakirsoy-Aslan, Merril Silverstein, Maria Brown, Seonghee Hong, Eugene Hall, Tasha Bell, Sarah Burcher, Steven Harris, Joe D. Wilmoth, Kenna Spiller, Leslie A. Anderson, Chalandra Bryant, Charity Somo; Facilitator: Joanne Roberts

8:30 AM
9:45 AM
Location
Salon 15
Session #
213
Session Type
Paper
Session Focus
  • Research
  • Practice
Organized By
  • Religion, Spirituality & Family

About the Session

  • 213-01 - Husband-Wife Religious Discordance: Consequences for Marital Satisfaction across 17 years
    By Woosang Hwang, Ayse Cakirsoy-Aslan, Merril Silverstein, Maria Brown
  • 213-02 - Just the Two of Us: How parental sacrifice and religiosity influence couple bonding
    By Seonghee Hong, Eugene Hall, Tasha Bell, Sarah Burcher, Steven Harris
  • 213-03 - Christian Media Consumption and Marital Quality Among Protestants
    By Joe D. Wilmoth, Kenna Spiller
  • 213-04 - Spirituality and African American Couples in Therapy: A Solution Focused Perspective
    By Leslie A. Anderson, Chalandra Bryant, Charity Somo

Facilitator: Joanne Roberts

Abstract(s)

Husband-Wife Religious Discordance: Consequences for Marital Satisfaction across 17 years

By Woosang Hwang, Ayse Cakirsoy-Aslan, Merril Silverstein, Maria Brown

We examined whether husband-wife religious denomination discordance in early stages of marriage produces weaker marital satisfaction, and whether the aforementioned association is moderated by husbands' and wives' religious intensity across seventeen years. One hundred and seventy-three husband-wife dyads, derived from six waves of the Longitudinal Study of Generations between 1988-2005, were analyzed using dyadic growth curve modeling. Results showed that husband-wife denomination discordance is associated with baseline levels and trajectories of wives' marital satisfaction, but not husbands' marital satisfaction. Wives' religious intensity moderated the association between husband-wife denomination discordance and marital satisfaction for both husbands and wives over time.

Objectives

1. To examine the relationship between religiosity and marriage over the family life course 2. To evaluate the effects of husband-wife religious denomination discordance on marital satisfaction over time 3. To ecluate the moderating effect of religious intensity in the association between religious denomination discordance and marital satisfaction over time

Just the Two of Us: How parental sacrifice and religiosity influence couple bonding

By Seonghee Hong, Eugene Hall, Tasha Bell, Sarah Burcher, Steven Harris

The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationship of parental sacrifice with couple bonding and religiosity. Parental Investment Theory and Social Exchange Theory were used as frameworks for hypothesis and analysis. The sample consisted of 1,211 participants from the Twogether in Texas data that identified as both a parent and in a committed relationship. Results from a hierarchical multiple regression analysis showed that child sacrifice and religiosity combined accounted for a significant portion of the variance in couple bonding. Couple bonding also increased significantly as child sacrifice increased for highly religious parents. Implications and limitations are discussed.

Objectives

1. To analyze the relationship between parents' sacrifice for children and couple bonding 2. To examine the influence of religiosity on the relationship between sacrifice for children and couple bonding 3. To demonstrate how religion can play a positive role in multiple family relationships Couples

Christian Media Consumption and Marital Quality Among Protestants

By Joe D. Wilmoth, Kenna Spiller

Protestant churches and parachurch organizations produce extensive media resources. Though religious activities and beliefs generally are associated with a positive impact on marital quality, no research has yet examined religious media and its effect on marital quality. This study uses data from the Family Needs Survey of Protestant churches (N = 6,613; Gritzon, 2013) to examine the relationship between Christian media consumption and marital quality. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses found that two of seven media-related variables (watching Christian television and viewing Christian websites/blogs) negatively predicted marital satisfaction, positive bond, and danger signs. Bidirectional effects likely explain these relationships.

Objectives

Understand the relationship between consumption of Christian media and marital quality in Protestant churches. Consider the causal relationship between media consumption and marital quality. Consider implications of this research for religious practitioners.

Spirituality and African American Couples in Therapy: A Solution Focused Perspective

By Leslie A. Anderson, Chalandra Bryant; Facilitator: Joanne Roberts

This study explores the significance of addressing spirituality and religiosity when working with African American couples in therapy and how doing so can support a solution-focused theoretical orientation.  The presenters will describe the critical role that spirituality plays in most African American families and how it is normally viewed and valued as a source of strength.  The information discussed in the presentation will describe to practitioners how including couples’ spiritual beliefs in treatment can positively impact the outcome of therapy.

Objectives

1. To demonstrate the roles spirituality and religious beliefs play in marital satisfaction of African American couples. 2. To explain how addressing a couple's religious beliefs and spirituality in therapy can contribute to positive outcomes in treatment. 3. To describe the practices of solution-focused therapy.

Bundle name
Conference Session