Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity in Family Therapy

Concurrent Sessions 5

Jared Kellerman, Christi McGeorge, Thomas Stone Carlson, Sudha Sankar, Heather McCauley, Jody Russon, Guy Diamond, Hoa Nguyen, Erika Grafsky

8:30 AM
9:45 AM
Location
Salon 2
Session #
212
Session Type
Paper
Session Focus
  • Research
Organized By
  • Family Therapy

About the Session

  • 212-01 - Indicators of LGB Affirmative Training: A Study of Family Therapy Faculty
    By Jared Kellerman, Christi McGeorge, Thomas Stone Carlson
  • 212-02 - Redefining Resilience: Sexual Minority Women’s Experiences
    By Sudha Sankar, Heather McCauley
  • 212-03 - Modifying ABFT for LGBTQ Agencies: Qualitative Findings from Therapists
    By Jody Russon, Guy Diamond
  • 212-04 - Coming In and Coming Out Narratives of LGBQ International Students
    By Hoa Nguyen, Erika Grafsky

Abstract(s)

Indicators of LGB Affirmative Training: A Study of Family Therapy Faculty

By Jared Kellerman, Christi McGeorge, Thomas Stone Carlson

This qualitative study investigated the indicators faculty used to determine the extent to which their programs were LGB affirmative. The sample consisted of 71 faculty members from accredited family therapy training programs who completed an online survey. The thematic analysis revealed five categories: (1) Teaching, Supervision, and Research, (2) Presence of LGB Faculty, Students, and Clients, (3) Values and Beliefs, (4) Overall Program Environment and (5) Not LGB Affirming. While many of the indicators were reflective of the recommendations in the literature, there were a wide range of indicators identified, which highlights the need for guidelines for LGB affirmative training.

Objectives

To identify the indicators associated with LGB affirmative training. To learn how to utilize the recommended strategies to improve my LGB affirmative training practices. To identify potential barriers to LGB affirmative training.

Redefining Resilience: Sexual Minority Women’s Experiences

By Sudha Sankar, Heather McCauley

Sexual minority women are at particular risk for a wide range of stressors and victimization and consequently face significant health disparities. Unfortunately, resilience continues to be defined on the basis of demonstrable risk or threat to normative development and outcomes. By doing so, everyday processes of resilience exhibited by these women are disregarded and rendered invisible. In this paper, we examine 25 sexual minority women's narratives to identify and elucidate everyday resilience processes reflected in their descriptions of their sexual and relationship experiences across a lifespan and discuss the implications of such a pluralistic view of resilience for mental health practice.

Objectives

(1) To present evidence of a non-binary, pluralistic view of resilience as evidenced in the narratives of sexual minority women with histories of intimate partner violence. (2) To provide examples of processual manifestations of resilience exhibited by these participants. (3) To discuss the implications of such a processual view of resilience for family therapists and other mental health practitioners.

Modifying ABFT for LGBTQ Agencies: Qualitative Findings from Therapists

By Jody Russon, Guy Diamond

LGBTQ youth report higher rates of suicidality than their heterosexual peers. Unfortunately, few suicide treatment models have been adapted and tested with this population. ABFT is one such model; however, it has yet to be implemented in LGBTQ-focused care settings. Successful implementation depends on collaborative partnerships with a broad range of stakeholders. This paper reports on findings from a focus group with therapist stakeholders. Participants discussed the contextual challenges associated with providing ABFT. Initial analysis revealed five themes: systemic sensitivity, stigma in research, families of choice, family engagement, and balancing parents and youth. Implications for manual modification will be discussed.

Objectives

1) Describe the basics of ABFT and how it has been adapted for LGBQ youth 2) Describe the implementation methodology utilized in the present study 3) Evaluate qualitative findings from therapist focus groups and connect with clinical implications for conducting family therapy for suicidal, LGBTQ youth

Coming In and Coming Out Narratives of LGBQ International Students

By Hoa Nguyen, Erika Grafsky

This project explores the experience of disclosing sexual identity for international students in the United States.  Despite the growing research on international students, international lesbian, gay, bisexual, and queer (LGBQ) students are overlooked in the literature (Singaravelu & Pope, 2007).  In addition, LGBQ research on the coming out process have been comprised largely of white, middle-class individuals and families.  Therefore, the study broadens our understanding of how international students who also identify as LGBQ experience the disclosure process, particularly in the context of moving to a different country.

Objectives

(1) To demonstrate the intersectional experiences of international LGBQ students. (2) To analyze the cultural narratives that shape disclosure of sexual identity. (3) To generate ways to support international LGBQ students.

Bundle name
Conference Session