Social Media is Changing Family Interactions

Concurrent Sessions 10

Samantha LeBouef, Jodi Dworkin, J. Mitchell Vaterlaus, Sarah Tulane, Brandon Porter, Niyantri Ravindran, Tessa Hamilton, Laurie Kramer, Angela Holth;  Facilitator: Robert Hughes

4:30 PM
5:45 PM
Location
Salon 15
Session #
342
Session Type
Paper
Session Focus
  • Research
  • Practice
Organized By
  • Education & Enrichment

About the Session

  • 342-01 - Near, far, wherever you are: Siblings and social media communication
    By Samantha LeBouef, Jodi Dworkin
  • 342-02 EE - Perceived Digital influences on Adolescent Romantic Relationships
    By J. Mitchell Vaterlaus, Sarah Tulane, Brandon Porter
  • 342-03 - Taking More Fun With Sisters and Brothers Online: Broadening Impact
    By Niyantri Ravindran, Tessa Hamilton, Laurie Kramer
  • 342-04 - Sensation Seeking and Emerging Adult Online Risk Behavior
    By Angela Holth, Jodi Dworkin

 Facilitator: Robert Hughes

Abstract(s)

Near, far, wherever you are: Siblings and social media communication

By Samantha LeBouef, Jodi Dworkin

While sibling relationships have been described across the lifespan, studies on communication between siblings are rare; with new technologies and high rates of use among emerging adults, it is important the role of these technologies in sibling relationships be explored. Participants (n=233) were recruited via MTurk to complete an online survey. Analyses revealed a significant positive correlation between social media communication and sibling closeness. A hierarchical linear regression was also computed. After controlling for demographics, social media communication with a sibling as well as prosocial behavior were significantly associated with sibling closeness. Implications for family relationships will be considered.

Objectives

(1) To understand the relationships between social networking communication and sibling closeness. (2) To further the understanding of emerging adult-sibling relationships. (3) To explore the relationships between sibling closeness and individual well-being.

Perceived Digital influences on Adolescent Romantic Relationships

By J. Mitchell Vaterlaus, Sarah Tulane, Brandon Porter

In this study adolescents and young adults (N = 204) detailed their perceptions of how entertainment media and interactive technology influence adolescent romantic relationships. Using a qualitative approach, we found six major themes. While entertainment media provided media role models for expected behavior in romantic relationships, it was also associated with the development of unrealistic relational expectations and perceived pressure to be in a romantic relationship. Participants perceived that interactive technology has changed the way adolescents communicate with romantic partners, become integrated into the entire relationship lifecycle, and led to a decline in face-to-face communication in adolescent romantic relationships.

Objectives

1) To provide a depth of understanding employing qualitative methodology to the perceived influence of media and technology on adolescent interpersonal relationships. 2) To examine the perceived role of entertainment media and interactive technology on adolescent romantic relationships from both adolescents (current participants in phenomenon) and emerging adults (recent participants in phenomenon) 3) To use multiple perspectives to answer the call of previous research to use qualitative methods to better understand the role of media and technology in adolescent relationships

Taking More Fun With Sisters and Brothers Online: Broadening Impact

By Niyantri Ravindran, Tessa Hamilton, Laurie Kramer

In this presentation, we illustrate how the essential components of a child-focused intervention to improve sibling relationship quality were translated into an online program that places parents in the role of teacher/coach. The More Fun with Sisters and Brothers Program, a five-session intervention for children aged 4-8 years, has been linked with reduced sibling agonism, improved sibling warmth and enhanced parents' emotional regulation and reactivity when managing challenging sibling behaviors. Specific challenges associated with program development and implementation, methods used to address these challenges, and the initial findings of a randomized control evaluation with 100 families will be presented.

Objectives

(1) To provide attendees with an overview of the considerations associated with converting an in-person evidence-based intervention into an online program. (2) To expose attendees to the opportunities, challenges and limitations associated with online program delivery modalities and provide examples of how such challenges can be addressed. (3) To inform attendees about evidence-based approaches to enhancing children’s sibling relationships and parent emotion regulation.

Sensation Seeking and Emerging Adult Online Risk Behavior

By Angela Holth, Jodi Dworkin

Young people are exposed to and participate in a number of risky online behaviors (White, Gummerum, & Hanoch, 2015), such as risky sexual behavior online. However, research on online risk-taking among emerging adults is limited, with even less known about the association between online risk-taking and sensation seeking, a personality trait commonly studied in relationship to risk behaviors. The current study fills this gap by exploring the associations between young adult sensation seeking, and online risk-taking behaviors. Findings indicate that different dimensions of sensation seeking have varying influence on these online risk-taking behaviors.

Objectives

(1) To analyze the associations between young adult sensation seeking, and online risk-taking behaviors from a family perspective. (2) To demonstrate the influence of sensation seeking on emerging adult online risk-taking behaviors. (3) To demonstrate the need for future research that explores the unique relationships between sensation seeking and specific online risk-taking behaviors.

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