Talking to Children and Adolescents About Sex and Sexuality

Concurrent Sessions 9

Katie Barrow, Megan Kuykendoll, Erin Lavender-Stott, Richelle Frabotta, Sarah Kuborn, Melinda Markham, Michelle Murray, Mary Nedela, Sarah Steelman, Kristin Anders, Spencer Olmstead; Facilitator: Karen Myers-Bowman

1:45 PM
3:00 PM
Location
Salon 12
Session #
331
Session Type
Paper
Session Focus
  • Research
  • Practice
Organized By
  • Education & Enrichment

About the Session

  • 331-01 - Sexuality Education with Young Children: A Review of Programs and Resources
    By Katie Barrow, Megan Kuykendoll, Erin Lavender-Stott, Richelle Frabotta
  • 331-02 - “I Wish They Would Have a Class for Parents About Talking to Their Kids About Sex[uality]”
    By Sarah Kuborn, Melinda Markham
  • 331-03 - Using Self-disclosure to Manage Student Misconceptions in a Human Sexuality Classroom
    By Michelle Murray, Mary Nedela, Sarah Steelman
  • 331-04 - An examination of developmental influences on emerging adults’ sexual identities
    By Kristin Anders, Spencer Olmstead

Facilitator: Karen Myers-Bowman

Abstract(s)

Sexuality Education with Young Children: A Review of Programs and Resources

By Katie Barrow, Megan Kuykendoll, Erin Lavender-Stott, Richelle Frabotta

Sexuality education is a lifelong process, yet there is a stigma attached to discussing sexuality with young children. The aim of this paper is to examine programs and curricula that provide sexuality education for children pre-K through third grade. Utilizing a qualitative content analysis of peer-refereed journal articles, the frequency with which early childhood sexuality education is mentioned in sexuality programming and curricula, and the type of information being discussed, will be presented. Additional information ascertained from reputable sexuality-based organizations and online resources will also be discussed. Suggestions and resources for parents/caregivers, educators, and practitioners will be shared.

Objectives

(1) To analyze evidence-based and theory-based sexuality education programs and curricula for children in early childhood (2) To evaluate non-academic sources of early childhood sexuality information available online (3) To identify and disseminate resources for parents/givers, educators, and practitioners

“I Wish They Would Have a Class for Parents About Talking to Their Kids About Sex[uality]”

By Sarah Kuborn, Melinda Markham

The purpose of this study was to examine what college students wish they had learned about sexuality from their parents prior to college, when they wish they received this information, and the methods they wish their parents would have utilized. An online survey using sentence stems was used to gather qualitative data from students who had taken an undergraduate human sexuality course. Students wanted to know more specific details about topics typically found in comprehensive sexuality education programs, and they described when and how they wanted to learn the sexuality content. Implications for practice will be provided.

Objectives

Participants will be able to: (1) understand college student’s perspectives on the sexuality education they wish they had from parents. (2) identify the want and need for parents discussing sexuality with their children. (3) provide evidence for educators regarding sexuality education programming for parents.

Using Self-disclosure to Manage Student Misconceptions in a Human Sexuality Classroom

By Michelle Murray, Mary Nedela, Sarah Steelman

This presentation explores how graduate student instructors of undergraduate human sexuality courses have utilized instructor disclosure of sexual orientation to challenge assumptions and misconceptions about sexuality. The presenters will discuss their pedagogical approaches and how they have used disclosure in the classroom to challenge students’ ideas about sexuality in accordance with these approaches. These experiences, as well as current literature, inform a discussion about the use of disclosure in any university course. The presenters will pose nine questions addressing the personal, pedagogical, and environmental considerations an instructor may consider when deciding whether or not to disclose their sexual orientation.

Objectives

1. Participants will be able to apply principles from their pedagogical approaches to their methods for addressing misconceptions about sexual orientation in the classroom. 2. Participants will be equipped to consider disclosure as a method for addressing misconceptions in the classroom. 3. Participants will create a plan for addressing misconceptions about sexual orientation in the classroom according to their pedagogical approaches and the context.

An examination of developmental influences on emerging adults’ sexual identities

By Kristin Anders, Spencer Olmstead; Facilitator: Karen Myers-Bowman

Using semi-structured qualitative interviews, we examined the Sexual Possible Selves (SPS) of a sample of first semester college-attending emerging adults (N = 36). Using applied thematic analysis, we examined emergent themes within college students’ sexual expectations, fears, and associated Behavioral strategies for their first semester in college. Variations in SPS were found based on gender and perceptions of the college sex cultures. Our study also examined themes within developmental influences to better understand differences in participants’ sexual possible selves during this important transitional period. Implications for sexuality and relationship education programs and research are discussed.

Objectives

To understand the developmental influences on sexual identity development; To expand sexual possible selves examinations through qualitative interviews; To enhance sexual education programs for first semester college students

Bundle name
Conference Session