TCRM: Theories of Family Development and Change

TCRM Paper Session 2

J. Scott Crapo, Kay Bradford, Stan J. Knapp, Greg Wurm; Discussants: Todd Martin and Dan Perlman; Presider: Chelsea Garneau-Rosner

12:15 PM
2:00 PM
Location
Salon 1
Session #
007
Session Type
TCRM

About the Session

  • 007-01 - Multidimensional Family Development Theory: An Evolution of Family Development
    By J. Scott Crapo, Kay Bradford
  • 007-02 - Theorizing Family Change: A Review and Reconceptualization
    By Stan J. Knapp, Greg Wurm

Discussants: Todd Martin and Dan Perlman
Presider: Chelsea Garneau-Rosner

 

Abstract(s)

Multidimensional Family Development Theory: An Evolution of Family Development

By J. Scott Crapo, Kay Bradford

We propose an evolution of family development theory that allows for complexity and uniqueness while still allowing for universal mechanisms of development. By breaking the aspects of the original theory into their component parts, we highlight how personal development in four different dimensions interact among family members to shape the family and possibly predict outcomes. We also aim to give common language for discussing issues related to family development in areas as diverse as multi-partner fertility and disability. Designed specifically as a research tool, this theory may generate hypotheses, promote research questions, guide methodology, make predictions, and explain observed phenomenon.

Theorizing Family Change: A Review and Reconceptualization

By Stan J. Knapp, Greg Wurm; Discussants: Todd Martin and Dan Perlman

This paper provides an extensive review of theory and research that has taken up the difficult task of theorizing family change. Moving beyond the deinstitutionalization debate in family studies, the paper develops a typology that places current research and theory into four different frameworks for conceptualizing family change: Institutional, Non-Institutional, Post-Institutional, and Neo-Institutional. Although all frameworks conceptualize the family as an institution historically, they each theorize recent family change in different ways: as either a process of deinstitutionalization, diversification, or differentiation. We propose a reconceptualization of family change through an elaboration of a neo-institutional perspective developed through drawing upon institutional logics theory and Max Weber’s concept of modernity as a field of competing value spheres.