Violence and Abuse in Couples and Families

Concurrent Sessions 1

Christina Rodriguez, Paul Silvia, Tatiana Melendez-Rhodes, Iva Kosutic, Kathleen Hlavaty, Megan Haselschwerdt, Janel M. Leone, Dayna M. Maniccia; Facilitator: Andrea Roach

8:30 AM
9:45 AM
Location
Salon 10
Session #
114
Session Type
Paper
Session Focus
  • Research
Organized By
  • Research & Theory

About the Session

  • 114-01 - Predicting Maternal/Paternal Abuse Risk: A Longitudinal Theoretical Design
    By Christina Rodriguez, Paul Silvia
  • 114-02 - Measuring Resistance to Violence in Intimate Partner Relationships
    By Tatiana Melendez-Rhodes, Iva Kosutic
  • 114-03 - Modifying the PMWI for Examining Exposure to Domestic Violence
    By Kathleen Hlavaty, Megan Haselschwerdt
  • 114-04 - 2016 NCFR INNOVATION GRANT WINNING PROPOSAL: Evaluation of Strong Through Every Mile (STEM), a Structured Running Program for Survivors of Intimate Partner Violence: An Interdisciplinary Examination of Psychological, Social, and Physical Wellbeing Outcome
    By Janel M. Leone, Dayna M. Maniccia

Facilitator: Andrea Roach

Abstract(s)

Predicting Maternal/Paternal Abuse Risk: A Longitudinal Theoretical Design

By Christina Rodriguez, Paul Silvia

The current study refines Social Information Processing (SIP) theory, examining whether SIP elements assessed prenatally can predict later parent-child aggression risk-for both mothers and fathers-potentially informing child abuse prevention programs which would benefit families and the communities they live in. Using a multimethod approach at two time points, abuse risk was assessed in a diverse sample of mothers and fathers. Dyadic analyses contrast mothers and fathers on specific pathways, indicating that socio-emotional and cognitive factors assessed prenatally predict abuse risk for parents of 6-month-olds, with stronger support for the model for fathers relative to mothers.

Objectives

1) To understand how theory can inform research and practice in preventing parent-child aggression; 2) To recognize the relative merits of comprehensive model refinement over selected factors; 3) To consider how innovative methodological approaches can bolster research conclusions to better guide practice implementations.

Measuring Resistance to Violence in Intimate Partner Relationships

By Tatiana Melendez-Rhodes, Iva Kosutic

The present study piloted an instrument designed to measure resistance strategies used by women survivors of domestic violence within romantic relationships for the purpose of empowerment and advocacy in clinical work. The instrument (RIPV) was administered to 215 women in domestic violence shelters in a Northeastern state. An exploratory factor analysis was conducted, and the results indicated consistency with the conceptual definition of resistance to intimate partner violence. The final version of the instrument included sixteen items and was composed of three subscales: 1) Confronting, 2) Withdrawing, and 3) Yielding.  Clinical implications for assessment and treatment intervention will be discussed.

Objectives

1) To analyze women’s use of resistance strategies in the context of intimate partner violence. 2) To describe the three dimensions of resistance used in the RIPV instrument. 3) To demonstrate the usefulness of using the RIPV instrument in assessment and clinical treatment.

Modifying the PMWI to for Examining Exposure to Domestic Violence

By Kathleen Hlavaty, Megan Haselschwerdt

This study examined the ability of the Psychological Maltreatment of Women Inventory-Dominance/Isolation subscale(PMWI-D/I) to differentiate between coercive controlling (CCV) and situational couple violence (SCV) when examine the experiences of young adults exposed to domestic violence (DV) during childhood and adolescents. Results provide support for this measure as a way to differentiate between CCV and SCV. Additionally, results highlight how exposure to CCV is associated with exposure to more severe, frequent, and injurious father-mother perpetrated DV; greater overall exposure experiences; as well as, an increased likelihood of experienced child abuse and maltreatment. Practical and policy implications and recommendations will be discussed.

Objectives

1. Examine whether or not the Psychological Maltreatment of Women Inventory-Dominance/Isolation subscale can be used to differentiate between coercive controlling (CCV) and situational couple violence (SCV) in a sample of domestic violence (DV)-exposed young adults. 2. Test whether there are differences in DV exposure and family violence exposure experiences by type of DV (i.e., CCV versus SCV). 3. Discuss how this measure subscale can be used in research, practice, and policy to better understand the diversity of experiences that fall within DV exposure.

2016 NCFR INNOVATION GRANT WINNING PROPOSAL: Evaluation of Strong Through Every Mile (STEM), a Structured Running Program for Survivors of Intimate Partner Violence: An Interdisciplinary Examination of Psychological, Social, and Physical Wellbeing Outcome

By Janel M. Leone, Dayna M. Maniccia
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Conference Session