Vulnerable Populations: The Impact of Families

Concurrent Sessions 4

Fiorella Carlos Chavez, Daphne Hernandez, Gregory Harris, Joseph Grzywacz, Christina Cross, Ann Nguyen, Robert Joseph Taylor, Linda Chatters, Sarai Coba-Rodriguez, Robin L. Jarrett, Susan Chuang, Meihua Zhu, Natasha Cooze, Thomas Esufali, Ashley Landers, Sharon Danes, Sandy White Hawk, Jane Harstad, Kate Ingalls-Maloney, Leanor Boulin Johnson; Facilitator: Roudi Nazarinia Roy

5:00 PM
6:15 PM
Location
Salon 14
Session #
153
Session Type
Lightning Paper
Session Focus
  • Research
Organized By
  • Ethnic Minorities

About the Session

  • 153-01 - Latino Household Food Security Concordance and Discordance
    By Fiorella Carlos Chavez, Daphne Hernandez, Gregory Harris, Joseph Grzywacz
  • 153-02 - Family Instrumental Support Among African Americans
    By Christina Cross, Ann Nguyen, Robert Joseph Taylor, Linda Chatters
  • 153-03 - “It Sets the Tone:” African-American Mothers’ Views on the Transition to Kindergarten
    By Sarai Coba-Rodriguez, Robin L. Jarrett
  • 153-04 - I’m With My Daddy!: Exploring Chinese Canadian and Mainland Chinese Fathers
    By Susan Chuang, Meihua Zhu, Natasha Cooze, Thomas Esufali
  • 153-05 - Contributing Factors to Reunification for American Indian and White Adults
    By Ashley Landers, Sharon Danes, Sandy White Hawk, Jane Harstad, Kate Ingalls-Maloney
  • 153-06 - Minority Status: Facilitator or Perpetrator of Work and Family Violence
    By Leanor Boulin Johnson

Facilitator: Roudi Nazarinia Roy

Abstract(s)

Latino Household Food Security Concordance and Discordance

By Fiorella Carlos Chavez, Daphne Hernandez, Gregory Harris, Joseph Grzywacz

Food insecurity disproportionately affects Latinos. Parents may be underreporting household food insecurity, in part, because older school-aged children or adolescents may not share their own attempts to modify eating or experiences of hunger. Informed by cultural ecological theory, this study: 1) determined concordance and discordance in parent- and adolescent-reported household food security; and 2) delineated variation in food security concordance by indicators of parent-child relationship quality. Findings indicated substantial discordance in food security reports (51.42%) between parents and adolescent. Greater dyadic conflict was associated with increased risk of discordance wherein parents appear to be unaware of food insecurity.

Objectives

1) to determine the degree of parent-adolescent concordance in reported household food security, 2) to determine the extent of parent-adolescent discordance in reported household food security, and 3) to delineate variation in concordance as a function of selected household and parent-adolescent relationship quality indicators.

Family Instrumental Support Among African Americans

By Christina Cross, Ann Nguyen, Robert Joseph Taylor, Linda Chatters

This study uses the the National Survey of American Life Re-Interview to examine the levels and types of instrumental support exchanges that occur within African American families, as well as the sociodemographic correlates of these exchanges. Four types of instrumental support are examined: transportation assistance, help with chores, financial assistance and help during illness. Findings indicate that there is considerable heterogeneity in the distribution of instrumental family support among African Americans. This support is patterned by a variety of financial and social resources, as well as subjective family closeness and frequency of family contact.

Objectives

1) Examine the levels and types of instrumental support exchanges that occur within African American families 2) Investigate how sociodemographic factors, sentiments (i.e., feelings of closeness), and Behavioral features of family networks (i.e., levels of interaction) are related to these exchanges 3) Draw upon family systems theory and the family solidarity model to better understand how and why African American families allocate resources and function as safety nets to their members

“It Sets the Tone:” African-American Mothers’ Views on the Transition to Kindergarten

By Sarai Coba-Rodriguez, Robin L. Jarrett

  Families play an important role in promoting children’s successful transition to kindergarten. With a sample of low-income, African-American mothers of transitioning children, we used qualitative interviews and a resilience framework to explore mother’s understanding of this developmental milestone. Findings include, the belief that the kindergarten transition was critical for education and for life chances, the high educational aspirations for children, and maternal transition strategies. These findings make substantive contributions to school readiness discussions, including how low-income, African-American mothers prepare their children for kindergarten. With limited research on this population, these first-hand accounts can help Head Start educators develop culturally-sensitive practices.

Objectives

1) Analyze how mothers discussed the kindergarten transition with their preschoolers. 2) Describe the role of Head Start in helping families be better equipped to successfully make the transition to kindergarten. 3) Develop culturally-relevant recommendations/strategies that promote home-school partnerships during children’s transition

I’m With My Daddy!: Exploring Chinese Canadian and Mainland Chinese Fathers

By Susan Chuang, Meihua Zhu, Natasha Cooze, Thomas Esufali

Our study explored the pathways of father involvement using our two-country (Canada, China) investigation of Chinese fathers with pre-school children. It is the only study that explores father involvement in Chinese families with young children. Also, we are currently the only researchers to employ a 24-hour account Time Diary Recall to capture the families' everyday activities. Regardless of country, fathers were actively engaged with their children, significantly spending more time playing with their children than in child care activities. For household chores, Chinese Canadian fathers spent more time doing chores whereas Chinese fathers spent more time playing with their children.

Objectives

(1) To evaluate father involvement in contemporary Chinese families in two countries; (2) To explore fathering from Bronfenbrenner's (1977) bioecological theory; and (3) To better theorize about fathering at a richer and more comprehensive fashion, nesting our understanding within family and cultural processes.

Contributing Factors to Reunification for American Indian and White Adults

By Ashley Landers, Sharon Danes, Sandy White Hawk, Jane Harstad, Kate Ingalls-Maloney

This study enhances the understanding of American Indian and White adults (ages 21-75) who were separated from their families of origin during childhood by foster-care and/or adoption by exploring the factors that contribute to the probability of reunification. Data from the Experiences of Adopted and Fostered Individuals Project (n=295) were analyzed using logistic regression. Race was not a statistically significant predictor of reunification. However, adoptees who traveled through foster-care and experienced poly-victimization in the foster/adoptive home were more likely to reunify. Future research is needed to shed light on the cultural predictors beyond race that account for differences in reunification.

Objectives

1. To increase knowledge of American Indian and White adults who were separated from their families of origin during childhood by foster-care and/or adoption. 2. To understand the factors that contribute to the probability of reunification for American Indian and White adults who were separated from their families of origin during childhood by foster-care and/or adoption. 3. To explore how those who traveled through the foster care system and who experienced poly-victimization in their foster and/or adoptive homes were more likely to reunify.

Minority Status: Facilitator or Perpetrator of Work and Family Violence

By Leanor Boulin Johnson; Facilitator: Walter Schumm

The increase interest in work-family violence in the social sciences since the 1970s does not reflect the trend among law enforcement agencies.The few giving attention to officers’ mental/physical wellness assume that it impacts job effectiveness.  However, statistical evidence specifically supporting the process and impact on both job and family seldom enters the discussion.  Further, recognition of differential affects and effects of such linkages for females and ethnic minorities too often appear in transient comments or a footnote.  Our study addresses this gap by examining stressors that contribute to police violence in the home and work.      

Objectives

By gender & race: 1. Empirically link officer's work stressors with home and work violence. 2. Differentiate between stress types & specific violent outcomes 3. Analyze types of coping and social support most effective in moderating the stress-strain linkage.

Bundle name
Conference Session