Adolescent Well-Being

Concurrent Sessions 4

Daisy Camacho-Thompson, Nancy Gonzales, Jenn-Yun Tein, Tia Claybrook, Samantha Howard, Ming Cui, Carol Darling, Hayley Love, Sarah Wolford, Fiorella Carlos Chavez, Jonathan Kimmes, Ross May, Frank Fincham

Facilitator: Kari Adamsons

 

4:45 PM
6:00 PM
Location
Royal Palm 4
Session #
150
Session Type
Paper
Session Focus
  • Research
Organized By
  • Research & Theory

About the Session

  • 150-01 - Parental Academic Involvement Across Adolescence Contextualized by Gender and Parenting 
    By Daisy Camacho-Thompson, Nancy Gonzales, Jenn-Yun Tein
  • 150-02 - The Impact of Early-Life Stress on Adolescent Externalizing Behavior and Educational Attainment
    By Tia Claybrook
  • 150-03 - Overinvolved Parenting, Emotional Dysregulation, and Adolescent Problems
    By Samantha Howard, Ming Cui, Carol Darling, Hayley Love
  • 150-04 - "I Had Let Everyone, Including Myself, Down": Illuminating the Self-Forgiveness Process Among College Students
    By Sarah Wolford, Fiorella Carlos Chavez, Jonathan Kimmes, Ross May, Frank Fincham

Abstract(s)

Parental Academic Involvement Across Adolescence Contextualized by Gender and Parenting

By Daisy Camacho-Thompson, Nancy Gonzales, Jenn-Yun Tein

Parental academic involvement is critical to academics. Mexican-origin parents reported their involvement during seventh grade and we examined gender differences in the association to twelfth grade academic outcomes (n = 710 families). Involvement predicted boys, but not girls’ GPAs, and adolescents’ preparation for the future. We examined the moderating role of acceptance and harsh parenting. Simple effects to an interaction between fathers’ involvement and harshness revealed that their involvement was positively associated with preparations for the future when they had high harshness for sons, but low harshness for daughters. Gender and parenting may be critical to understanding involvement during adolescence.

Objectives

To examine the longitudinal associations between mothers’ and fathers’ academic involvement during seventh grade to adolescents’ GPA and preparations for the future during twelfth
To examine the moderating role of adolescent gender in maternal and paternal academic involvement
To examine the moderating role of parenting (acceptance and harshness) on the association between parental academic involvement and girls’ and boys’ academics

The Impact of Early-Life Stress on Adolescent Externalizing Behavior and Educational Attainment

By Tia Claybrook

Due to the high prevalence of early life stressors (ELSs) and heightened vulnerability for adolescents to be exposed to ELSs, the purpose of the current study was to identify protective factors outside of the home environment for seventh-grade adolescents who have been exposed to ELSs. Two primary areas were addressed. First, the impact of ELSs on adolescent externalizing behavior (anger expression and antisocial behavior) and educational attainment was examined (separately) while controlling for parental involvement level. Then, school connectedness and teacher-student relationship quality were examined as moderators of ELSs using linear and logistic regression analyses.

Objectives

1) Determine whether early life stressors negatively impact anger expression, antisocial behavior, and high school graduation status for adolescents regardless of parental involvement.2) Determine whether school connectedness moderates the effect of early life stressors on anger expression, antisocial behavior, and high school graudation status for adolescents. 3) Determine wether teacher-student relationship quality moderates the effect of early life stressors on anger expression, antisocial behavior, and high school graudation status for adolescents. 

Overinvolved Parenting, Emotional Dysregulation, and Adolescent Problems

By Samantha Howard, Ming Cui, Carol Darling, Hayley Love

Based on parenting framework (Baumrind, 1967; Maccoby & Martin, 1983) and social learning theory (Bandura, 1977), this study aimed to investigate the association between overinvolved parenting and adolescents’ anxiety and depression, as well as the possible mediating/moderating mechanism of adolescents’ emotional dysregulation. A racially and ethnically diverse sample of adolescents was drawn from four high schools. Adolescents’ primary parents/caregivers also participated. Online survey was conducted. Results from structural equation modeling (SEM) suggested that overinvolved parenting was positively associated with adolescents’ anxiety and depression, and that emotional dysregulation mediated the association. Implications were also discussed.

Objectives

1) Investigate the relationship between overinvolved parenting and adolescent depression.2) Investigate the relationship between overinvolved parenting and adolescent anxiety.3) Examine the potential role of adolescent emotional dysregulation on these relationships.

"I Had Let Everyone, Including Myself, Down": Illuminating the Self-Forgiveness Process Among College Students

By Sarah Wolford, Fiorella Carlos Chavez, Jonathan Kimmes, Ross May, Frank Fincham

Self-forgiveness can occur for transgressions against others (interpersonal transgressions) and against oneself (intrapersonal transgressions). In self-forgiveness of interpersonal transgressions, the self is not the victim, whereas in self-forgiveness of intrapersonal transgressions, the self is both perpetrator and victim. Using thematic analysis, this study explored (n = 88) female college students’ past intrapersonal transgressions to identify the situational contexts and their emotional determinants based on differing types of transgression outcomes (i.e., able to forgive oneself vs. unable to forgive oneself). Qualitative analysis revealed the most common situational circumstances and internal emotional determinants that were embedded in these contexts. Implications are discussed.

Objectives

(1) To explore the most common intrapersonal transgressions via identification of salient contextual themes among female college students(2) To understand the emotional determinants associated with the self-forgiveness process of intrapersonal transgressions among female college students(3) To expand the theory of self-forgiveness to include other emotional determinants besides guilt and shame

Bundle name
Conference Session