Childhood Trauma, Adversity, and Chronic Health Conditions

Concurrent Session 11

Natalie Williams, Pompeia Villachan-Lyra, Cody Hollist, Christine Marvin, Emmanuelle Chavez, Leopoldo Barbosa, Naomi Wheeler, Carolyn Scholtes, Elizabeth Skowron, Emma Lyons, Kathleen Johnson, Erinn Duprey, Cui Zehua, Jeri Sasser, Daisy Gallegos, Assaf Oshri, Sarah Steward, Jeffrey Jackson, Susanne Roper, Bertranna Muruthi, Rachel Jumper

Facilitator: Kimberly Greder

11:00 AM
12:15 PM
Location
Royal Palm 2
Session #
408
Session Type
Lightning Paper
Session Focus
  • Research
  • Practice
Organized By
  • Families & Health

About the Session

  • (PAPER CANCELLED) 408-01 - Longitudinal Mental Health of Youth With Learning Disabilities: Individual and Family Factors
    By Amanda Williams
  • 408-02 - Psychosocial Adaptation of Parents to Toddlers With Congenital Zika Virus Syndrome in Brazil
    By Natalie Williams, Pompeia Villachan-Lyra, Cody Hollist, Christine Marvin, Emmanuelle Chavez, Leopoldo Barbosa
  • 408-03 - Adverse Childhood Experiences in Relationship Education: A Public Health Opportunity
    By Naomi Wheeler
  • 408-04 - Severity of Child Maltreatment and Children’s Inhibitory Control
    By Carolyn Scholtes, Elizabeth Skowron, Emma Lyons, Kathleen Johnson
  • 408-05 - Childhood Maltreatment and Suicidal Ideation: Future Orientation as a Protective Factor for Low-SES Young Adults
    By Erinn Duprey, Cui Zehua, Jeri Sasser, Daisy Gallegos, Assaf Oshri
  • 408-06 - Support Group Value and Design for Parents of Children With Severe Developmental Disabilities
    By Jeffrey Jackson, Sarah Steward, Susanne Roper, Bertranna Muruthi
  • 408-07 - “The Bullies Will Know You Told Your Mommy": Bullying and the Lived Experiences of Gifted Children
    By Rachel Jumper

Abstract(s)

Psychosocial Adaptation of Parents to Toddlers With Congenital Zika Virus Syndrome in Brazil

By Natalie Williams, Pompeia Villachan-Lyra, Cody Hollist, Christine Marvin, Emmanuelle Chavez, Leopoldo Barbosa

This study investigates the psychosocial impact of having a toddler with Congenital Zika Virus Syndrome on parents in Recife, Brazil. Participants are recruited from a public hospital and report on their psychological symptoms, parenting stress, coping, and family resources. Preliminary results indicate clinically significant symptoms of depression in 12.6% of participants. Higher anxiety is associated with lower physical necessities/shelter, less family support, and less mobilizing the family. Higher depression scores are associated with higher parenting stress, less family support, and more use of child care. Results will be used to inform family interventions to promote parental wellbeing and caregiving capacity.

Objectives

1. To understand the mental health challenges facing Brazilian parents caring for toddlers with serious cognitive and physical diabilities.2. To determine individual and contextual factors that affect caregiver's preceptions of their wellbeing.3. To identify points for intervention with families of children with severe disabilities that are consistent with family needs and priorities.

Adverse Childhood Experiences in Relationship Education: A Public Health Opportunity

By Naomi Wheeler

In this study, we explored the prevalence of adverse childhood experiences (ACE) reported by participants enrolled in a federally-funded relationship education (RE) program, as well as, differences in relationship health factors by ACE score. Participants represented an understudied demographic, couples with economic disadvantage and a diverse racial and ethnic background. Thus, results provide contextual information relevant to the conceptualization of RE couple needs and ACE-related health risk. We found a high prevalence of ACE, including disproportionate representation in the highest risk ACE group (i.e., four or more ACE) as well as a significant effect between ACE score and indicators of relational health.

Objectives

Participants will be able to identify ACE indicators and prevalence of ACE exposure in a sample of couples enrolled in RE.Participants will be able to identify the influence of ACE score to factors associated with relational health.Participants will discuss implications of ACE-relational health interactions for prevention and public health intervention with couples with economic disadvantage and a racial/ethnic minority background.

Severity of Child Maltreatment and Children’s Inhibitory Control

By Carolyn Scholtes, Elizabeth Skowron, Emma Lyons, Kathleen Johnson

Inhibitory control (IC), or the ability to inhibit a dominant response and engage in a subdominant response, is a crucial aspect of self-regulation that facilitates children’s ability to adhere to social standards and engage in prosocial behavior. Research has documented the negative impact of child maltreatment (CM) on developing IC skills; however, research has not fully examined whether the severity of CM experienced is associated with variations in children’s IC. This study examines the impact of CM severity on IC and explores the moderating effects of biological sex.

Objectives

1. To examine the impact of maltreatment severity on children's inhibitory control.2. To examine the influence of maltreatment on children's inhibitory control in a younger age range than it is typically examined and where this skill is rapidly developing.3. To examine child biological sex as a moderator of the relationship between maltreatment severity and children's inhibitory control.

Childhood Maltreatment and Suicidal Ideation: Future Orientation as a Protective Factor for Low-SES Young Adults

By Erinn Duprey, Cui Zehua, Jeri Sasser, Daisy Gallegos, Assaf Oshri

Childhood maltreatment has been identified as a major risk factor for suicide-related behaviors during adolescence and young adulthood. Yet, research is needed to identify protective factors that can buffer the risk for suicidal ideation, in order to inform both clinical practice and suicide prevention programs. The present study examined two aspects of future orientation (FO; relational and career/academic) as protective factors in the link between childhood maltreatment and suicidal ideation. Results indicated that higher career/academic FO was directly associated with lower levels of suicidal ideation. Further, career/academic FO buffered the link specifically between physical neglect and suicidal ideation.

Objectives

1. To investigate the relation between childhood maltreatment and young adult suicidal ideation in a low-SES sample.2. To examine future orientation is a protective factor for youth who were exposed to childhood maltreatment.3. To examine two aspects of future orientation in relation to youth outcomes: career/academic future orientation, and family/relational future orientation.

Support Group Value and Design for Parents of Children With Severe Developmental Disabilities

By Sarah Steward, Jeffrey Jackson, Susanne Roper, Bertranna Muruthi

The purpose of this study was to determine the perceived value of support groups and identify recommendations for support group design based on the experiences and feedback of 19 interviews with parents of children with severe or profound developmental disabilities. Despite varied experiences with support groups, most participants indicated the value of support groups is in providing a place where parents can feel understood and share and gather information. Parents recommended support groups targeted for parents of children with similar disabilities and needs that have flexible structures and qualified leaders, and offer a wide variety of content in various formats.

Objectives

Attendees will be able to identify the five aspects of support groups that parents of children with severe developmental disabilities value the most.Attendees will be able to identify the five aspects of support groups that parents of children with severe developmental disabilities value the least.Attendees will learn the most significant considerations in how to best design and implement support groups for parents of children with disabilities.

“The Bullies Will Know You Told Your Mommy": Bullying and the Lived Experiences of Gifted Children

By Rachel Jumper

This paper uses focus groups to examine the qualitative experiences of gifted children and bullying in school.  Data were collected from 26 gifted children at two schools.  The study revealed several interesting themes regarding gifted children’s perceptions about bullying and disclosing bullying to parents, teachers, and peers.  Specifically, themes about what bullying is, where it occurs, who gets bullied, and the role of parents and peers on helping buffer the effects of bullying were discovered.  Implications for school policies, understanding the complexity of intervention, and families of the gifted to communicate about bullying are discussed. 

Objectives

To understand the lived experiences of gifted children and their thoughts on bullying in schools.To demonstrate that parents and peers play an important role in buffering the effects of bullying for children.To analyze how schools might play a role in intervening for gifted children.

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