Common Factors in Therapy and Training

Concurrent Sessions 6

Carissa DAniello Heyda, Stephen Fife, Amy Morgan, Lorien Jordan, Jessica Goodman, Stephen Fife, Carissa D'Aniello-Heyda, Dane Eggleston, Jesse Smith, Susan Dow, Alyssa Christal, Laura Evans, Norman Epstein, Shyneice Porter

Facilitator: Shayne Anderson

1:30 PM
2:45 PM
Location
Royal Palm 4
Session #
233
Session Type
Paper
Session Focus
  • Research
  • Practice
Organized By
  • Family Therapy

About the Session

  • 233-01 - Faculty and Student Experiences of Common Factors in MFT Training
    By Carissa DAniello Heyda, Stephen Fife
  • 233-02 - Where Do We Go From Here? Approaches to Integrating Advocacy Into the Family Therapist Identity
    By Amy Morgan, Lorien Jordan, Jessica Goodman
  • 233-03 - Common Factors in Master Session Videos: A Deductive Qualitative Analysis
    By Stephen Fife, Carissa D'Aniello-Heyda, Dane Eggleston, Jesse Smith, Susan Dow, Alyssa Christal
  • 233-04 - Couple Therapist Common Factors In-Session Behavior: Degree of Consistency Across Time
    By Laura Evans, Norman Epstein, Shyneice Porter

Abstract(s)

Faculty and Student Experiences of Common Factors in MFT Training

By Carissa DAniello Heyda, Stephen Fife

Despite increased attention to common factors (CF) in the MFT field, there has been limited empirical attention to the role and benefits of CF in training. This paper presents the results of two empirical studies about CF training in MFT programs.  The first is the findings from a survey of MFT program directors about the role of CF in their programs.  The second study was a phenomenological investigation of students’ experience of CF training. Both studies support the inclusion of CF in MFT training, as it enhances students’ confidence, understanding of models, conceptual abilities, and clinical practice.

Objectives

Participants will identify common factors that affect the therapeutic processParticipants will list 3 benefits of including common factors in MFT supervision or trainingParticipants will teach supervisees/trainees about the importance of common factors in their therapy practice

Where Do We Go From Here? Approaches to Integrating Advocacy Into the Family Therapist Identity

By Amy Morgan, Lorien Jordan, Jessica Goodman

Research indicates that family therapists express interest in advocacy, yet relatively few are regularly engaged in or have had formal training in social and political advocacy. The lack of trained and engaged advocates leaves the field exposed to threats specific to our work and family policy debate. In this roundtable, we will facilitate a discussion on empirically supported pedagogical approaches to teaching advocacy skills. Further, this roundtable discussion will focus on both the significance of family therapist advocacy as well as the practical methods by which family therapists can engage in advocacy across every stage of one’s career. 

Objectives

(1) To identify relevant advocacy platforms and actions for the family therapy profession and clients.
(2) To assess the role of advocacy in professional development.
(3) To develop an action plan for advocacy issues and training relevant to the personal and professional causes of the participant.

Common Factors in Master Session Videos: A Deductive Qualitative Analysis

By Stephen Fife, Carissa D'Aniello-Heyda, Dane Eggleston, Jesse Smith, Susan Dow, Alyssa Christal

Common factors have been examined within MFT theoretically, but they have limited empirical support. This presentation highlights the results of a study of common factors in MFT through the analysis of therapy sessions with master therapists across ten MFT models. Researchers utilized deductive qualitative analysis (DQA) to evaluate common factors unique to MFT (Sprenkle, Blow, & Dickey, 1999; Sprenkle, Davis, & Lebow, 2009). DQA is a qualitative methodology that allows researchers to evaluate, refine, and expand existing theory. Results indicate a) partial support and refinement of previously identified MFT common factors, and b) additional factors common across MFT models.

Objectives

Based on the content of the session, I am able to describe general and MFT-specific common factors.Based on the content of the session, I am able to identify the influence of common factors in therapy sessions with couples and families. Based on the content of the session, I am able to apply common factors to my own work as an MFT.

Couple Therapist Common Factors In-Session Behavior: Degree of Consistency Across Time

By Laura Evans, Norman Epstein, Shyneice Porter

This study examines the consistency of couple therapist common factors behaviors (warmth, empathy, presence, validation, collaboration, session structuring, and systemic technique factors) over time (between session 4 and session 8 of a 10-session therapy protocol) among 32 heterosexual couples who presented to treatment with mild levels of physical or psychological partner aggression. Results indicate that therapist use of common factor behaviors, with the exception of validation, significantly decreased, but the variability of behaviors increased. This therapy process study highlights the importance of understanding how therapist behaviors change over time, and the impact this might have on treatment outcomes.

Objectives

1) Evaluate the importance of investigating therapist common factor behaviors in couple therapy.
2) Identify methods used to conduct couple therapy process research.
3) Assess variation in consistency of therapy common factor behaviors over time.

Bundle name
Conference Session