Contemporary Challenges and Resilience Among Native American Children Living in Diverse Family Structures

Concurrent Sessions 9

Ashley Landers, Jennifer Bellamy, Sharon Danes, Noah Gagner, Sandy White Hawk, Ashley Landers, Amy Morgan, Sharon Danes, Sandy White Hawk, Ashley Landers, Amy Morgan, Sharon Danes, Carolyn Liebler, Sandy White Hawk

Facilitator: Lorena Aceves (replacing Diamond Bravo)

1:30 PM
2:45 PM
Location
Royal Palm 3
Session #
334
Session Type
Lightning Paper
Session Focus
  • Research
Organized By
  • Ethnic Minorities

About the Session

  • 334-01 - Placement Instability of American Indian Children in Out-of-Home Care
    By Ashley Landers, Jennifer Bellamy, Sharon Danes, Noah Gagner, Sandy White Hawk
  • 334-02 - Does Reunification Matter? Social Connection and Tribal Enrollment of American Indian Adoptees
    By Ashley Landers, Amy Morgan, Sharon Danes, Sandy White Hawk
  • 334-03 - American Indian Adoptees/Fosterees: Barriers to Tribal Enrollment
    By Ashley Landers, Amy Morgan, Sharon Danes, Carolyn Liebler, Sandy White Hawk

Abstract(s)

Placement Instability of American Indian Children in Out-of-Home Care

By Ashley Landers, Jennifer Bellamy, Sharon Danes, Noah Gagner, Sandy White Hawk

This study enhances the understanding of American Indian children (ages 2­-15) in out-of-home care by exploring differences in placement instability for American Indian children compared to children of other races (African American and Caucasian). Baseline and 36­-month follow-­up data from Child Protective Services sample of the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well­being (NSCAW I) were analyzed using propensity score matching. Race did not have a statistically significant effect on placement instability at 36-months. American Indian children experienced comparable rates of placement instability. Future research is needed to shed light on the cultural factors beyond race that may account for differences in placement instability.

Objectives

To apply Family Adjustment and Adaptation Reponses (FAAR) theory to children exposed to child maltreatment and out-of-home placement.To examine the effect of race on placement instability of children in out-of-home care.To demonstrate the comparable risk for placement instability among American Indian, White, and African American children in out-of-home care.

Does Reunification Matter? Social Connection and Tribal Enrollment of American Indian Adoptees

By Ashley Landers, Amy Morgan, Sharon Danes, Sandy White Hawk

This study enhances the understanding of American Indian (AI) adults who were separated from their families of origin during childhood by foster care and/or adoption. While many AI adults are finding their way home and reunifying, less is known about social connection to tribe and tribal enrollment. Data from the Experiences of Adopted and Fostered Individuals Project (n = 129) were analyzed using regression analyses. Reunification was a significant predictor of greater social connection to tribe and increased likelihood of tribal enrollment. Future research is needed to shed light on the potential barriers that AI adoptees encounter to tribal enrollment.

Objectives

1. To apply identity theory to examine the role of reunification in social connection to tribe and tribal enrollment among American Indian adults who were separated from their families of origin during childhood by foster care and/or adoption. 2. To examine the effect of reunification on social connection to tribe and tribal enrollment in American Indian adults who were separated from their families of origin during childhood by foster care and/or adoption. 3. To demonstrate that reunification plays a significant role in predicting social connection and enrollment (e.g., reunification may be a steppingstone toward these outcomes).

American Indian Adoptees/Fosterees: Barriers to Tribal Enrollment

By Ashley Landers, Amy Morgan, Sharon Danes, Carolyn Liebler, Sandy White Hawk

This study enhances the understanding of the reasons why American Indian (AI) adults who were separated from their families of origin in childhood by foster care and/or adoption report not enrolling in their tribe. While many AI adults are finding their way home and reunifying, less is known about barriers to tribal enrollment. Data from the Experiences of Adopted and Fostered Individuals Project (n = 60) were analyzed using thematic analysis to inductively identify themes. Thematic analysis revealed three key themes: (1) individual or personal barriers; (2) issues related to records; and (3) unknown familial and tribal lineage. Future research is needed to shed light on facilitators to tribal enrollment across the individual, familial, and tribal level.

Objectives

1. To apply identity theory to understand the reasons that contribute to the search and desire for tribal enrollment among American Indian adults who were separated from their families of origin during childhood by foster care and/or adoption. 2. To examine the reasons why American Indian adults who were separated from their families of origin in childhood by foster care and/or adoption report not enrolling in their tribe? 3. To demonstrate the key reasons why American Indian adoptees report not enrolling in their tribe including: (1) individual or personal barriers; (2) issues related to records; and (3) unknown familial and tribal lineage.

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