Exploring Positive Development and Success Among Diverse Youth and Adolescents

Concurrent Sessions 3

Chao Liu, Clint Broadbent, Ronald Cox, Isaac Washburn, Julie Croff, Jordan Arellanes, Kimberly Greder, Michelle Toews, Kristin Anders, Norma Perez-Brena, Silvia Mayen, Diana Cedeño, Autumn Bermea, Bradley Eeden-Moorefield, Michelle Towes, Rachael Doubledee, Zachary Giano, Michael Merten, Miu Yee Mimi Ho, Andrea Roach

Facilitator: Katie Zeiders

3:15 PM
4:30 PM
Location
Royal Palm 2
Session #
137
Session Type
Lightning Paper
Session Focus
  • Research
Organized By
  • Ethnic Minorities

About the Session

  • 137-01 - A Measurement Invariance Test of Two Common Subscales Within Positive Youth Development Framework Among Latino Immigrant Youth
    By Chao Liu, Clint Broadbent, Ronald Cox, Isaac Washburn, Julie Croff
  • 137-02 - Short-Term Outcomes Related to Success Coaching Among Latino Youth Who Were At Risk of Not Completing High School
    By Jordan Arellanes, Kimberly Greder
  • 137-03 - "I Have Hope": Exploring Pregnant and Parenting Latino Adolescents' Possible Selves
    By Michelle Toews, Kristin Anders, Norma Perez-Brena, Silvia Mayen
  • 137-04 - Mexican-American Adolescent Fatherhood and Gender: A Transnational View
    By Diana Cedeño, Autumn Bermea, Bradley Eeden-Moorefield, Michelle Towes, Rachael Doubledee
  • 137-05 - Latino Adolescents and School Connectedness: How They Interface With GPA Trajectories
    By Zachary Giano, Michael Merten
  • 137-06 - First- and Second-Generation Immigrant Adolescent Academic Success and Parental Involvement
    By Miu Yee Mimi Ho, Andrea Roach

Abstract(s)

A Measurement Invariance Test of Two Common Subscales Within Positive Youth Development Framework Among Latino Immigrant Youth

By Chao Liu, Clint Broadbent, Ronald Cox, Isaac Washburn, Julie Croff

The present study aims to test the psychometric properties of two common core measures of Positive Youth Development (PYD) for use among Latino immigrant youth. Although the empirical structure of the five Cs model has been established in previous studies, data were collected mostly from general adolescent populations and may not hold for use with Latino immigrants. This study tested the reliability and validity of two subscales from Lerner’s PYD framework, Social Conscience and Caring , for their use with a Latino immigrant population. Scalar invariance was established for both subscales, implying strong reliability. Regression analyses showed predictive validity for the social conscience subscale such that it was negatively correlated with Antisocial Behavior measure. No correlation was found between the Caring and Antisocial Behavior.

Objectives

1. To evaluate the reliability and validity of two subscales within the Positive Youth Development framework2. To establish culturally sensitive measurement for Latino immigrant population3. To identify developmental assets among Latino immigrant youth

Short-Term Outcomes Related to Success Coaching Among Latino Youth Who Were At Risk of Not Completing High School

By Jordan Arellanes, Kimberly Greder

Success coaching is a method of academic mentorship for youth and families. The current study is based on data collected from “success coach notes” of 82 Latino youth who live in two Midwestern communities. A thematic analysis was conducted to identify short-term outcomes related to Latino youth’s experiences participating in success coaching. Preliminary findings suggest that success coaching may have more short-term outcomes for youth who are at-risk for high school completion but experience fewer and less substantial barriers to academic achievement than youth who face multiple barriers at the individual and family levels. Additional research is needed to identify short- and long-term outcomes of success coaching among Latino youth who are at risk for not graduating from high school.

Objectives

To evaluate the effectiveness of Success Coaching on Latino youth's educational attainment.To analyze the accademic trajectories of Latino youth throughout high school.To develop reccomendations for future Success Coach programing.

"I Have Hope": Exploring Pregnant and Parenting Latino Adolescents' Possible Selves

By Michelle Toews, Kristin Anders, Norma Perez-Brena, Silvia Mayen

The purpose of this study was to explore pregnant and parenting Latino adolescents’ possible selves. Specifically, we used the open-ended possible selves questionnaire to ask 56 pregnant and parenting adolescents enrolled in a relationship education program to describe their ideal and feared selves over the next five years. Similar to previous research, the majority of adolescents’ possible selves focused on achievements related to their academic selves, interpersonal relationships, and lifestyle goals; however, new culturally specific possible selves were also identified. Further, although previous research has shown that adolescents’ possible selves are typically intrinsically motivated, our sample was more extrinsically focused.

Objectives

To examine whether the possible selves framework is an appropriate fit for pregnant and parenting adolescents.To discover culturally relevant future-oriented selves specific to pregnant and parenting Latino adolescents.To highlight what service providers can do to support pregnant and parenting Latino adolescents in achieving their ideal selves.

Mexican-American Adolescent Fatherhood and Gender: A Transnational View

By Diana Cedeño, Autumn Bermea, Bradley Eeden-Moorefield, Michelle Towes, Rachael Doubledee

Despite evidence suggesting Latino adolescents' parents experience unique challenges related to parenthood, little is known about how Latino adolescent transnational fathers develop identity regarding gender and the family processes that influence gender perceptions and parenting. To address this gap, this case study explored transnationality and identity for a Mexican-American adolescent father. We used data from an adolescent father to examine associations between different family processes. Preliminary discussions of transnational experiences, the importance of family of origin, particularly the influence of his father’s machismo, and platonic female friendships, were associated with perceptions of his ideal family while transitioning into fatherhood.

Objectives

To evaluate the challenges transnational adolecent fathers face. To analyze how transnational adolecent fathers culturally navigate and adapt towards being new fathers To demonstrate the need for more culturally responsive programs for transnational adolecent parents

Latino Adolescents and School Connectedness: How They Interface With GPA Trajectories

By Zachary Giano, Michael Merten

Research suggests that Latino adolescents face challenges with respect to their academic career in high school, more specifically, ones who have undocumented parents.  School connectedness has been studied as an important ingredient with respect to success in high school, yet has not been studied with respect to Latino adolescents with undocumented or documented parents (LAWUP and LAWDP, respectively).  The current study examines the interface of LAWUP/LAWDP and school connectedness by a series of split-plot ANOVAs which track differences in GPA trajectories through high school.  Preliminary results show the importance of school connected to LAWUP with respect to GPA.

Objectives

1. To evaluate high school success (i.e. GPA) by parental documentation status in Latino adolescents.2. To evaluate high school success (i.e. GPA) by levels of school connectedness.3. To evaluate how parental documentation status and school connectedness interface, split by Latino adolescents with documented parents, and those with undocumented parents. 

First- and Second-Generation Immigrant Adolescent Academic Success and Parental Involvement

By Miu Yee Mimi Ho, Andrea Roach

The purpose of this study was to understand the lived experiences of adolescent academic success for immigrant single- and dual-parent households. Participants for this study were interviewed using the phenomenological approach. Topics included family, parenting styles, peers, education, discrimination, self-perception, and identity. While our results indicate some participants lived experiences reflect parental involvement was a source of support, academic success was also self-motivated and supported by non-familial systems for those with less involved parents. This study provides a comprehensive and critical view on adolescent adverse experiences, cultural implications, and external supports, which can inform parents, school personnel, and community leaders.

Objectives

To analyze adolescents from immigrant families using ecological, family, and identity theories.To analyze adolescents from immigrant families using phenomenology approach.Demonstrate strengths of immigrant families and adolescents.

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