Family Structure, Intergenerational Parenting, and Child Health Outcomes

Concurrent Sessions 8

Aurora Jackson, Jeong Kyun Choi, Dayoung Bae, Meejung Chin, Kandauda A. S. Wickrama, Jeong Kyun Choi, Gilbert Gilbert Parra, Qingyu Jiang, Mark Pettit, Evin Richardson, Ted Futris, Jerry Gale, Jacquelyn Mallette, Evin Richardson, Ted Futris, Hunter Stanfield, James Bates, Alan Taylor, Luke Russell, Chang Su-Russell, Jonathon Beckmeyer

Facilitator: Luke Russell

8:30 AM
9:45 AM
Location
Royal Palm 2
Session #
314
Session Type
Lightning Paper
Session Focus
  • Research
Organized By
  • Families & Health

About the Session

  • 314-01 - Harsh Parenting and Black Boys’ Behavior Problems: Single Mothers’ Parenting Stress and Nonresident Fathers’ Involvement
    By Aurora Jackson, Jeong Kyun Choi
  • 314-02 - Typologies of First Cohabitation Experiences and Later Health Among Young Adults
    By Dayoung Bae, Meejung Chin, Kandauda A. S. Wickrama
  • 314-03 - Unmarried Parents’ Cooperative Coparenting and Their Children's Behavior Problems: Ages 1 Through 9
    By Jeong Kyun Choi, Gilbert Gilbert Parra, Qingyu Jiang
  • 314-04 - Foster Caregivers’ Mindfulness and Couple Relationship Quality
    By Mark Pettit, Evin Richardson, Ted Futris, Jerry Gale
  • 314-05 - Fostering Support: Foster Mother Support and Parenting and Relationship Outcomes
    By Jacquelyn Mallette, Evin Richardson, Ted Futris
  • 314-06 - Variations in Grandfathering: Characteristics of Involved, Passive, and Disengaged Grandfathers
    By Hunter Stanfield, James Bates, Alan Taylor
  • 314-07 - Family Management and Positive Development in Structurally Diverse Families
    By Luke Russell, Chang Su-Russell, Jonathon Beckmeyer

Abstract(s)

Harsh Parenting and Black Boys’ Behavior Problems: Single Mothers’ Parenting Stress and Nonresident Fathers’ Involvement

By Aurora Jackson, Jeong Kyun Choi

Using a subsample of 748 unmarried black mothers with their male child from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, we tested a model linking economic hardship and nonresident fathers’ involvement in single mothers’ family life during black boys’ early childhood (ages 3 – 5) to behavior problems in middle childhood (age 9). The findings suggest that economic hardship was linked to harsh parenting through mothers’ depressive symptoms and parenting stress, both of which were related to increased harsh parenting.  Fathers’ involvement was associated with reduced economic hardship, parenting stress, and levels of harsh parenting. Harsh parenting was associated positively with boys’ behavior problems.

Objectives

To examine the effects of mothers’ harsh parenting on black young boys’ behavior problems To examine the indirect effects of mothers’ economic hardship on child behavior problems transmitted through mothers’ depressive symptoms, parenting stress, and harsh parentingTo examine the indirect effects of nonresident fathers’ involvement on child behavior problems transmitted through mothers’ depressive symptoms, parenting stress, and harsh parenting

Typologies of First Cohabitation Experiences and Later Health Among Young Adults

By Dayoung Bae, Meejung Chin, Kandauda A. S. Wickrama

The purpose of the present study is to identify various typologies of first cohabitation experiences spanning young adulthood and their health consequences. Using a nationally representative sample of young adults, we conducted a series of latent class analyses using the indicators of age at first cohabitation, cohabitation duration, having a child, types of cohabitation dissolution, and multiple transitions, which yielded five typologies of the first cohabitation: (1) Stable Cohabitation, (2) Transition to marriage, (3) Transition to Singlehood, (4) Early Cohabitation to Multiple Transitions, and (5) Early & Long-Term Cohabitation. These five classes were uniquely associated with later health outcomes. The Early Cohabitation to Multiple Transitions group appeared particularly disadvantaged, as they reported more depressive symptoms than their Stable Cohabitation and Transition to Marriage counterparts.

Objectives

1. To investigate the heterogeneity of the first cohabitation experiences spanning young adulthood using a nationally representative sample of young adults.
2. To evaluate the characteristics across the distinct profiles of the first cohabitation experiences.
3. To examine prospective associations of the first cohabitation experiences with later mental and physical health outcomes.

Unmarried Parents’ Cooperative Coparenting and Their Children's Behavior Problems: Ages 1 Through 9

By Jeong Kyun Choi, Gilbert Gilbert Parra, Qingyu Jiang

Using a sample of 1,656 dyads of unmarried parents and their children from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing data, this longitudinal study examined bidirectional relations between unmarried parents’ coparenting and their children’s behavior problems over time (child ages 1, 3, 5, and 9). Our final cross-lagged structural equation model shows that all pathways from coparenting at one time point to child behavior problems at the following time point were significant, indicating that supportive coparenting at earlier times is likely to result in fewer child behavior problems later. None of the lagged paths from behavior problems to coparenting were significant.

Objectives

To examine the trends of unmarried parents’ coparenting and their children’s behavior problems over time (child ages 1, 3, 5, and 9)To test bidirectional relations between unmarried parents’ coparenting and their children’s behavior problems (child ages 1, 3, 5, and 9)

Foster Caregivers’ Mindfulness and Couple Relationship Quality

By Mark Pettit, Evin Richardson, Ted Futris, Jerry Gale

The unique stressors foster caregivers experience negatively impacts their health, relationship quality, and, in turn, capacity to provide stable, quality care. (Buehler et al., 2006; Barnett et al., 2017). Although existing literature reinforces the health benefits of contemplative practices, such as mindfulness (Fredrickson et al., 2017), how these practices might enhance foster caregivers’ couple relationship quality is less clear. Guided by the contextual model of family stress (Boss, Bryant, & Mancini, 2017), the present study identifies the contextual factors associated with foster caregivers engaging in mindfulness practices and how mindfulness is linked to various indicators of couple relationship quality.

Objectives

(1) to explore different subgroups (latent classes) of foster caregivers’ mindfulness, (2) to understand individual characteristics and experiences that may covary with the subgroups of mindfulness, (3) to determine if membership in a certain mindfulness group impacts couple relationship outcomes.

Fostering Support: Foster Mother Support and Parenting and Relationship Outcomes

By Jacquelyn Mallette, Evin Richardson, Ted Futris

Foster caregivers are often encouraged to utilize various supports such as training, social networks, and professional resources. Although these supports can promote resilience and better familial outcomes, qualitative investigations suggest that many foster caregivers perceive their supports as unfulfilling and insufficient. The current study explores how the amount of supports (e.g., the number of reported supports) and the perception of those supports (e.g., how helpful they are) uniquely influence parenting stress and relationship quality among a sample of foster mothers.  Better understanding of how social support systems influence parenting and relationships can inform programming and trainings targeted to foster caregivers and enhance the availability of helpful and supportive resources.

Objectives

1. To identify patterns of social support based on foster caregivers’ reports of amount of supports and helpfulness of supports 2. To analyze how the amount of supports (e.g., the number of reported supports) and the perception of those supports (e.g., how helpful they are) impacts the parenting stress of foster mothers. 3. To analyze how the amount of supports (e.g., the number of reported supports) and the perception of those supports (e.g., how helpful they are) impacts the reported relationship quality of foster mothers.

Variations in Grandfathering: Characteristics of Involved, Passive, and Disengaged Grandfathers

By Hunter Stanfield, James Bates, Alan Taylor

Grandfather involvement is comprised of contact frequency, intergenerational commitment, and participation in activities, and refers to grandfathers’ efforts to develop and maintain relationships with grandchildren. Recent research has identified three distinct grandfathering typologies: involved, passive, and disengaged. In this study, we use multinomial logistic regression to explore various demographic, health, and interpersonal factors that may determine the grandfathering style of a sample of 351 grandfathers. Results indicate that household income, grandfather agreeableness, geographic distance from the grandchild, age of the grandchild, and the quality of and satisfaction with the relationship with the grandchild are factors categorizing an involved grandfather.

Objectives

1. To increase awareness of researchers about grandfather-grandchild relationships and the variations in grandfathering behaviors.
2. To analyze the impact of different demographic and personal characteristics on the different styles of grandfathering and the implications for the grandfather-grandchild relationship.
3. To demonstrate the need for additional research that augments the grandfather-grandchild relationship and improves family relationships. 

Family Management and Positive Development in Structurally Diverse Families

By Luke Russell, Chang Su-Russell, Jonathon Beckmeyer

Guided by family systems theory, we explored how family management practices were associated with positive developmental outcomes among youth living in four common contemporary family structures: married stepfamilies, cohabiting stepfamilies, single-mother divorced/separated families, and single-mother never-married families. Data from the 2011-2012 National Survey of Children’s Health was analyzed using a multi-group structural equation model analysis. Findings suggest some family management practices may be more (or less) effective than others in promoting positive youth outcomes in certain family contexts. Understanding these variations may be helpful to family life educators or other family practitioners when designing educational content or targeting interventions.

Objectives

1)      Identify family management practices that benefit youth living in stepfamilies and single-mother families.2)      Understand the importance of positive development for youth living in stepfamilies and single-mother families.3)      Apply a strengths-based approach to the development of youth living in stepfamilies and single-mother families.

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