Family Systems Research on Adolescent and Young Adult Health and Well-Being

Concurrent Sessions 10

AliceAnn Crandall, Elizabeth Powell, Gracie Bradford, Brianna Magnusson, Len Novilla, Carl Hanson, Michael Barnes, Roy Bean, Pooja Brar, Jodi Dworkin, Sonya Brady, Julie Cederbaum, Jingwen Zhang, John Jemmott, Loretta Jemmott, Katherine Dorman, Larry Forthun, Rosemary Barnett, Emily Simpson, Courtney Lincoln, Christine McCauley Ohannessian, Kevin Shafer, Nathan Robbins, Andrew Renick

Facilitator: Brianna Roth

3:00 PM
4:15 PM
Location
Royal Palm 3
Session #
342
Session Type
Lightning Paper
Session Focus
  • Research
Organized By
  • Families & Health

About the Session

  • 342-01 - Using Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs as a Framework for Adolescent Depression
    By AliceAnn Crandall, Elizabeth Powell, Gracie Bradford, Brianna Magnusson, Len Novilla, Carl Hanson, Michael Barnes, Roy Bean
  • 342-02 - Family Influence on Adolescent Females’ Self-Efficacy to Refuse Unprotected Sex and Use Condoms
    By Pooja Brar, Jodi Dworkin, Sonya Brady
  • 342-03 - Mother-Son Communication: A Theory-Based Behavioral Intervention to Reduce Sexual Behaviors Among Inner-City African American Adolescents
    By Julie Cederbaum, Jingwen Zhang, John Jemmott, Loretta Jemmott
  • 342-04 - Anxiety and Depression in Emerging Adulthood: Relationship Attachment Styles and Parenting
    By Katherine Dorman, Larry Forthun, Rosemary Barnett
  • 342-05 - Family Cohesion and Youth Dysregulation: Moderation by Bullying and Gender
    By Emily Simpson, Courtney Lincoln, Christine McCauley Ohannessian
  • (PAPER CANCELLED) 342-06 - Adolescent Media Use, Mental Health, and Sexual Risk Behaviors
    By Renae Merrill, Amanda Williams
  • 342-07 - Individual and Combined Effects of Parental Depression on Adolescent Well-Being
    By Kevin Shafer, Nathan Robbins, Andrew Renick

Abstract(s)

Using Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs as a Framework for Adolescent Depression

By AliceAnn Crandall, Elizabeth Powell, Gracie Bradford, Brianna Magnusson, Len Novilla, Carl Hanson, Michael Barnes, Roy Bean

Prior studies have shown a link between family SES, safety, connectedness, and adolescent locus of control with adolescent depressive symptoms. The purpose of this study was to explore the pathways associated with baseline and change in adolescent depressive symptoms using Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs. We used a 5-year longitudinal sample of 500 adolescents and their parents. Data were analyzed using a structural equation modeling growth curve. Results indicated that Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs was a predictive framework for baseline depressive symptoms, but was less helpful in predicting change in depressive symptoms over time. The implications for practice are discussed.

Objectives

1) Explain at least 2 pathways through which family connection affects adolescent depression.2) Identify at least one Maslow Hierarchy of Needs predictor of adolescent depression intercept and slope.3) List one direct predictor of adolescent depression growth using Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs.

Family Influence on Adolescent Females’ Self-Efficacy to Refuse Unprotected Sex and Use Condoms

By Pooja Brar, Jodi Dworkin, Sonya Brady

Parent factors play a protective role in adolescent sexual behaviors (meta-analysis, Widman et al., 2016). The link between parenting and adolescent sexual behaviors may lie in the adolescents’ belief that they can perform the desired behavior (Bandura, 1977). The current study is composed of a subsample (n=128 at baseline) of sexually active adolescent females who participated in an online intervention promoting condom use and healthy romantic relationships. At baseline, participants were between the ages of 14 and 18 years (Mean= 17). Correlations indicate family factors are associated with self-efficacy to refuse unprotected sex and use condoms. Controlling for the intervention, growth curve analysis with six months of data with assessments at baseline and the end of six subsequent months will be conducted.

Objectives

1. Association of family connectedness with self-efficacy to refuse unprotected sex and condom use.2. Association of family-adolescent contraception communication with self-efficacy to refuse unprotected sex and condom use.3. Longitudinal, across 7 months, association among variables.

Mother-Son Communication: A Theory-Based Behavioral Intervention to Reduce Sexual Behaviors Among Inner-City African American Adolescents

By Julie Cederbaum, Jingwen Zhang, John Jemmott, Loretta Jemmott

This study tested the efficacy of a culturally grounded, theory-based mother-son intervention. African American mothers were randomized into a HIV/STI risk-reduction intervention or an attention-matched control intervention. Mothers and sons (525 dyads) completed surveys pre- and post-intervention, and at 3-, 6-, 12-, 18- and 24-months (N=366; 69.7% retention). Those in the HIV/STI risk-reduction intervention were more likely to communicate about sexual intercourse, birth control, HIV/AIDS prevention, and condoms. Efficacy weakened over time. The work highlights the value of the intervention to increase parental protective factors to decrease HIV risk behaviors and increase positive development for African American adolescent males.

Objectives

Describe the sexual risk reduction needs of inner-city African American adolescent boys 
Evaluate the effectiveness of an intervention to increase sexual risk communication between African American mothers and their sons
Discuss implications for clinical practice with African American families

Anxiety and Depression in Emerging Adulthood: Relationship Attachment Styles and Parenting

By Katherine Dorman, Larry Forthun, Rosemary Barnett

The aim of this study is to make connections between Romantic Attachment Style seen in Emerging Adulthood and the outcomes of depression and anxiety, with a focus on parents (Maternal/Paternal Connection, Maternal/Paternal Nurturance, Maternal/Paternal Psychological Control, and Maternal/Paternal Disrespect). Using data from the Multi-Site University Study of Identity and Culture (MUSIC), this study provides a unique, nationally representative sample of college students. This study has the potential to add empirical research to the national discussion surrounding the mental health and wellbeing of the youth being raised in this country. Parents, and youth perceptions of their parents, should be a fundamental consideration in the development of programing and policies aimed at promoting positive youth development and the overall health of youth/emerging-adults.

Objectives

To evaluate the effectiveness of the person centered approach to clustering individuals by Romantic Attachment StyleTo analyze depression and anxiety using perceptions of parental Connection, Nurturance, Psychological Control, and Disrespect.To evaluate the effectiveness of using a cluster analysis approach to describe emerging adult relationships with parents

Family Cohesion and Youth Dysregulation: Moderation by Bullying and Gender

By Emily Simpson, Courtney Lincoln, Christine McCauley Ohannessian

The relationship between family cohesion and emotion dysregulation, specifically emotional reactivity and poor mindfulness, was examined in an early adolescent sample (N= 1098, 51% girls). The potential moderating effects of bullying, as relational victimization, and gender were also examined. Regression results indicated that family cohesion, relational victimization, gender, and interactions accounted for significant proportions of variance in emotional reactivity and mindfulness (R2 =.25, .16, respectively, ps<.001). Simple slope analyses indicated that family cohesion was negatively related to emotional reactivity in the presence of high relational victimization (b= -.04 p<.001). For girls, family cohesion was negatively related to emotional reactivity and poorer mindfulness (b= -.05, -.44, respectively, ps<.001). Findings highlight that warm, supportive families may protect against dysregulation, especially for girls.

Objectives

1) To apply the bioecological model to dysregulation in early adolescence.
2) To examine the relationship between family cohesion and early adolescent dysregulation
3) To examine relational victimization and gender as moderators of the relationship between family cohesion and early adolescent dysregulation.

Individual and Combined Effects of Parental Depression on Adolescent Well-Being

By Kevin Shafer, Nathan Robbins, Andrew Renick

Parental depression can significantly impact children. Previous research has shown differential impacts on child outcomes of maternal and paternal depression, but it remains unknown what the comparative effects are when both parents experience depression compared to one parent. Data was taken from the Survey of Early Child Care and Youth Development  and included 898 adolescents and their biological/adoptive/social parents. OLS regression analysis revealed externalizing problems were higher for children with depressed fathers and when both parents were depressed. Internalizing problems were more prevalent when mother's and both parents were depressed. The results underscore the impact of parental mental health on children of all ages, and the need for research which considers the full family system, not just mothers and children.

Objectives

1. To explore the impact of parental mental health on child outcomes
2. To bring a family systemic view to mental health processes
3. To assess possible gendered differences of parents and children in families with mental health problems

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