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Family Therapy Roundtable Symposium 2

Concurrent Sessions 7

Nathan Hardy, Matthew Brosi, Todd Spencer, Jamie Dellinger, Kaylin Bailey, Katherine Stockhecker, Jody Russon, Noah Gagner, Ashley Landers, Alyssa Banford Witting, Elizabeth Wieling, Damir Utrzan, Desiree Seponski, Jody Russon, Guy Diamond, Tammy Daughtry, Jay Daughtry, Iman Dadras, Sandra Espinoza

Facilitator: Glade Topham

 

3:00 PM
4:15 PM
Location
Royal Palm 5 and 6
Session #
244
Session Type
Roundtable
Session Focus
  • Research
  • Practice
Organized By
  • Family Therapy

About the Session

  • 244-01 - The Four Cornerstones of Effective Clinical Training in Couple, Marital, and Family Therapy
    By Nathan Hardy, Matthew Brosi, Todd Spencer
  • 244-02 - Caregivers of LGBTQ+ Youth: Attitudes toward an Attachment-Informed Family Treatment Approach
    By Jamie Dellinger, Kaylin Bailey, Katherine Stockhecker, Jody Russon
  • 244-03 - Facilitating Space for Social Justice Practices
    By Noah Gagner, Ashley Landers
  • 244-04 - Family Level Interventions for Mass Traumas in a Global Context
    By Alyssa Banford Witting, Elizabeth Wieling, Damir Utrzan, Desiree Seponski
  • 244-05 - Family Engagement Strategies for Educators and Providers: Supporting Suicidal Youth
    By Jody Russon, Guy Diamond
  • 244-06 - One Heart, Two Homes: Coparenting Resources for Working With Single Parents and Stepparents
    By Tammy Daughtry, Jay Daughtry
  • 244-07 - Decolonization of Family Therapy Epistemology: A Dilemma for Conscious Therapist
    By Iman Dadras, Sandra Espinoza

Abstract(s)

The Four Cornerstones of Effective Clinical Training in Couple, Marital, and Family Therapy

By Nathan Hardy, Matthew Brosi, Todd Spencer

Training CMFT’s is a dynamic, unique, and rewarding opportunity. Training CMFT’s in the 21st Century opens up many opportunities for enriching trainee’s education and preparedness for contemporary practice. Yet sometimes there is a lack of clarity as to what trainees really need to focus on to prepare for real-world practice. The purpose of this Roundtable Discussion is highlight the key factors that need to be incorporated into training programs and stimulate a discussion on how to hone in on these factors and the barriers to training in them. Namely, I will describe four cornerstones of effective clinical training: Integrative and systemic lens, multicultural and social justice orientation, research-informed practice, and self-of-the-therapist work.

Objectives

To evaluate the four cornerstones of effective clinical training in CMFTTo address barriers to effective clinical training in CMFTTo identify opportunities to increase effective clinical training in CMFT

Caregivers of LGBTQ+ Youth: Attitudes toward an Attachment-Informed Family Treatment Approach

By Jamie Dellinger, Kaylin Bailey, Katherine Stockhecker, Jody Russon

Thirty years of research have shown that LGBTQ+ youth report higher rates of depression and suicidal ideation than their heterosexual and cisgender peers. Given the impact of family relationships on mental health in this population, family-based interventions may be particularly relevant for at risk, LGBTQ+ youth. Unfortunately, due to issues of stigma and rejection, clinicians can face challenges when attempting to engage caregivers. This qualitative study examines caregivers’ perceptions and attitudes toward an attachment-informed, family treatment provided in an LGBTQ+ youth center. Findings support modifying pre-intervention engagement strategies to the needs of caregivers of LGBTQ+ youth.

Objectives

- Explain literature supporting the impact of family relationships of suicidal LGBTQ+ youth.- Discuss the purpose of current research in the context of community-based care.- List atleast three barriers to engagement in a family intervention, specific to caregivers of LGBTQ+ youth.

Facilitating Space for Social Justice Practices

By Noah Gagner, Ashley Landers

This rountable will discuss our responses as family therapists to social injustices perpetuated by institutions. General conceptualizations of social justice include principled approaches towards diversity, inclusion, equity, and liberation (Oleen-Junk, 2016). Within family therapy, however, conceptualizations of social justice are confounded within multicultural competencies and practices sanctioned by professional organizations (Sue, Rasheed, Rasheed, 2015). Here it is suggested that to be a social justice orientated family therapist, one must demonstrate not only an awareness of injustice, but skills and action outside of family therapy praxis that address social, institutional, and cultural barriers to equity and safety (i.e., physical and emotional) (Ratts et al., 2015). In accordance with Vera and Speight (2003, p. 261), to be social justice oriented “[one] must seek to transform the world”.

Objectives

Participants will recognize and understand current conceptualizations of social justice and its relationship with family therapy.Participants will discuss current areas of social injustice and the role of family therapist in addressing inequities.Participants will be able to identify current family therapy institutional practices that restrict and/or promote social justice.

Family Level Interventions for Mass Traumas in a Global Context

By Alyssa Banford Witting, Elizabeth Wieling, Damir Utrzan, Desiree Seponski

The adverse psychological and relational impact of mass traumas resulting from war and organized violence around the world is ubiquitous with tremendous implications for prevention and intervention research across systemic levels. There is broad recognition that we are currently experiencing a humanitarian crisis related to forced displacement; culturally relevant and efficacious systemic interventions are critically needed. Most conventional mental health approaches for the treatment of traumatic stress related to war and violence, have been individually focused. The current lack of evidence- and practice-based systemic interventions to support war-affected and displaced families represents a clinical and structural crisis in global mental health. Our presentation adds to scholarly commentary calling for systemically oriented intervention for mass trauma contexts.

Objectives

Participants will be able to: 1. Define mass trauma contexts 2. Understand the effects of traumatic stress and displacement on global communities 3. Describe examples of culturally-relevant systemic interventions developed for mass traumas 4. Identify how CFT programs can prepare students to work with ongoing and upcoming humanitarian problems in the 21st century

Family Engagement Strategies for Educators and Providers: Supporting Suicidal Youth

By Jody Russon, Guy Diamond

Suicide is a serious, multidimensional problem for youth in the United States. Educators and service providers play critical roles in suicide intervention by connecting youth with mental health care. Family engagement can be impactful in these efforts. Unfortunately, motivating families to attend treatment is an ongoing challenge due to psychological, logistic and systemic barriers. This interactive, family engagement workshop will provide attendees with a model for engaging caregivers in the treatment referral process. Afterward, participants will be able to demonstrate a series of interventions aimed toward a) motivating caregivers and b) reducing youth defensiveness to create a stronger ccaregiver-child partnership.

Objectives

Explain the barriers associated with engaging families in the treatment referral process
Describe strategies to motivate caregivers to support their child in receiving mental health care
Demonstrate at least 3 intervention skills associated with facilitating a stronger caregiver-child partnership

One Heart, Two Homes: Coparenting Resources for Working With Single Parents and Stepparents

By Tammy Daughtry, Jay Daughtry

Divorce impacts over a million children a year in America. Post-divorce co-parenting is critical to the emotional health of the children and the long-term outcomes of their stability. Helping co-parents decrease conflict and increase communication is critical! By understanding the complexities involved, therapists, educators and family advocates can make a critical and positive impact on society and future generations to come. Attendees will also learn about the five categories of co-parenting and their outcomes for children. Discussion will include handling the hand-offs, holidays, finances, co-parent meetings, improving communication and the two-year post-divorce adjustment timeline. Powerful multi-media vignettes will be shared throughout the presentation from the "One Heart, Two Homes" curriculum. Each attendee will be given a One Heart, Two Homes Training Certificate upon completion.

Objectives

1. Describe the six risk factors for children of divorce and how to counter-act the negative outcomes for children with healthy co-parenting skills and strategies.
2. Internalize the five categories of co-parenting and the impact of each on children's resilience levels.
3. Be able to articulate the two year post-divorce adjustment timeline and how to empower parents toward stability and healthy co-parenting.
4. Explore strategies to educate divorced parents on co-parenting communication skills, co-parenting meetings and strategies to handle holidays for the sake of the children.
5. Define why it is ideal to include step parents in the co-parent communication as well as how to approach this topic with clients with the goal of empowering the client to action.

Decolonization of Family Therapy Epistemology: A Dilemma for Conscious Therapist

By Iman Dadras, Sandra Espinoza

Today, the field of systemic family therapy is overwhelmingly obsessed with practicing evidence-based models, the transcultural application Western family therapy concepts and techniques to non-Western countries (McDowell, 2015), and globalizing normative view of family functioning based on Western conceptualization.  Such an ethnocentrically colonial view has further marginalized the indigenous cultural knowledge of different ethnic groups for emotional healing since it does not fit into contemporary post-positivist scientific paradigm of Western academia. Furthermore, majorities of currently used therapeutic interventions are aimed for a first order or limitedly second order change which overlook the impact of larger societal system on mental health. 

Objectives

Participants would be interactively engaged in acknowledging current issues when working with families in multicultural settingHow therapists can work on their level of differentiation from dominant cultural values and discourses while working with oppressed groupsParticipants will attain the opportunity to think critically about how their value systems may unconsciously influence their therapeutic relationship.

Bundle name
Conference Session