Helicopter Parenting: Is It the Nature of Responsiveness?

Concurrent Sessions 1

Peipei Hong, Ming Cui, Hayley Love, Hayley Love, Ross May, Ming Cui, Frank Fincham, Peipei Hong, Samantha Howard, Woosang Hwang, Eunjoo Jung, Yue Zhang, Seong Hee Kim, Hye Lim Sin, Zhenqiang Zhao, Jenny Park, Seonghee Hong, Xun Zhang, Mark Lopez, Helen Stevens, Leanne Sheeran, Wendy Middlemiss

Facilitator: Wendy Middlemiss

8:30 AM
9:45 AM
Location
Royal Palm 4
Session #
110
Session Type
Paper
Session Focus
  • Research
  • Practice
Organized By
  • Education & Enrichment

About the Session

  • 110-01 - Helicopter Parenting, Self-Control, and College Students’ Mental Health
    By Peipei Hong, Ming Cui, Hayley Love
  • 110-02 - Helicopter Parenting, Parent Gender, and College Student School Burnout
    By Hayley Love, Ross May, Ming Cui, Frank Fincham, Peipei Hong, Samantha Howard
  • 110-03 - Helicopter Parenting and College Students’ Academic Outcomes: A Comparative Study
    By Woosang Hwang, Eunjoo Jung, Yue Zhang, Seong Hee Kim, Hye Lim Sin, Zhenqiang Zhao, Jenny Park
  • 110-04 - Parental Goals of Parents With Young Children: A Critical Review
    By Seonghee Hong
  • 110-05 - Are There Benefits to Responding to Your Infant When They First Begin to Cry? A Systematic Review
    By Xun Zhang, Mark Lopez, Helen Stevens, Leanne Sheeran, Wendy Middlemiss

Abstract(s)

Helicopter Parenting, Self-Control, and College Students’ Mental Health

By Peipei Hong, Ming Cui, Hayley Love

Previous studies have revealed that helicopter parenting has a negative association with college students’ mental health. In the present study, we aim to extend the literature and investigate how and under what conditions helicopter parenting is related to college students’ mental health by examining a potential mediator - self-control, and a contextual (moderating) factor - living arrangement. With a sample of 432 college students, results from structural equation modeling suggested that (1) self-control mediated the association between helicopter parenting and college students’ mental health problems, and (2) living arrangement moderated such pathways. Implications were also discussed.  

Objectives

1. To demonstrate the underlying mechanism connecting helicopter parenting and college students' mental health.2. To inform practitioners to design parenting programs.3. To inform educators and policy makers to develop and promote prevention and intervention programs to enchance college students' self-control.

Helicopter Parenting, Parent Gender, and College Student School Burnout

By Hayley Love, Ross May, Ming Cui, Frank Fincham, Peipei Hong, Samantha Howard

In this study we examined the relationships between helicopter parenting and school burnout among college students. Specially, we explored self-control as a potential mediating mechanism and whether these effects differed by parent gender. An online survey of 427 college students from two universities was conducted. Results from structural equation modeling revealed full mediation by self-control between maternal helicopter parenting and school burnout and partial mediation between paternal helicopter parenting and school burnout. These findings add to the literature on helicopter parenting and academic-related outcomes and shed light on parent gender effects in the context of this phenomenon.

Objectives

To analyze the relationship between helicopter parenting and college student school burnout.To investigate college student self-control as a mediating mechanism to explain the relationship between helicopter parenting and college student school burnout.To investigate parent gender role effects on the association between helicopter parenting and college student school burnout.

Helicopter Parenting and College Students’ Academic Outcomes: A Comparative Study

By Woosang Hwang, Eunjoo Jung, Yue Zhang, Seong Hee Kim, Hye Lim Sin, Zhenqiang Zhao, Jenny Park

This study examined the relationships among helicopter parenting, self-efficacy, perceived academic control, and academic outcomes of college students in the United States (N = 218) and South Korea (N = 170). Multi-group structural equational modeling results suggested that American students were more negatively impacted by helicopter parenting than Korean students. Higher levels of American helicopter parenting were related to students’ diminished perception of academic control, which, in turn, related to poorer academic achievement. Korean helicopter parenting had no relation with children’s academic achievement. In both countries, students’ perceived academic control was a powerful predictor of better academic achievement.

Objectives

1. This study provides important insights for researchers and practitioners seeking to understand the implications of helicopter parenting for college students’ academic performance in different cultures.2. This study is helpful for parents, administrators, and school personnel to conceptualize how college students’ academic outcomes may be affected during the late adolescent years.3. This study provides a future direction for researchers to focus on the different effects of helicopter parenting on children’s academic outcomes across different cultures.

Parental Goals of Parents With Young Children: A Critical Review

By Seonghee Hong

This critical review is conducted to examine and evaluate research on parental goals of parents with young children. Thirteen studies conducted recent ten years are selected and reviewed for theoretical frameworks, methods, and findings. It is found that differences in conceptualization of parental goals and measurements based on unclear definitions have impeded effective research. With the limited perspective of contrasting cultural models (Individualism versus Collectivism), many studies have failed to conduct in-depth research to examine other aspects of parental goals or the predictive value of parenting goals. Parental awareness theory is suggested as a useful perspective for examining goals as a function of adult cognitive development. Understanding parental goals will serve as a parenting guide as well as offer valuable insights for parenting education programs.

Objectives

To review research on parental goals of parents with young children To address the limitations of previous studies about parental goals by critically reviewing the selected articles To provide new directions for future research about parental goals

Are There Benefits to Responding to Your Infant When They First Begin to Cry? A Systematic Review

By Xun Zhang, Mark Lopez, Helen Stevens, Leanne Sheeran, Wendy Middlemiss

Infant communication is vocalized primarily through crying--conveying a wide range of feelings and messages. But, when should you pick up a crying infant? Family life educators often hear this question when working with new parents. Contemporary thinking across the world creates a dilemma for educators, as decisions about when to respond differ across families’ culture, community expectations, and views of sensitivity. This literature review provides an important tool to help educators understand how parental/caregiver responsiveness influences neurological, socio-emotional, and intellectual development. Sharing this information with families can help parents make informed decisions about how to respond to infants’ cries.

Objectives

Following this presentation, participants will be able to1. describe the role of responsiveness for children's development. 2. synthesize research based information with parents' care approaches. 3. list benefits of responsiveness for both parent and child.

Bundle name
Conference Session