How Religion Continues to Influence Young Adult Decision-Making

Concurrent Sessions 9

Deirdre Quinn, Amy Lewin, Rafee Al-Mansur, Leigh Leslie, Hailey McClain, Marielle Jackson, Addison Elledge, Brandon Burr, Mitchell Rhodes, Joshua Novak, Bryan Spuhler

Facilitator: Byran Korth

1:30 PM
2:45 PM
Location
Pacific Salon 2
Session #
337
Session Type
Paper
Session Focus
  • Research
Organized By
  • Religion, Spirituality & Family

About the Session

  • 337-01 - Family Religiosity, Parental Monitoring, and Emerging Adults’ Sexual Behavior
    By Deirdre Quinn, Amy Lewin
  • 337-02 - Assessing the Relationship of Muslim and American Identity With Practices in Mate Selection
    By Rafee Al-Mansur, Leigh Leslie
  • 337-03 - Specific Aspects of Religiosity and Marital Attitudes: Differences by Age
    By Hailey McClain, Marielle Jackson, Addison Elledge, Brandon Burr
  • 337-04 - Predictors of Sexual Assertiveness Among Highly Religious Single Young Adults
    By Mitchell Rhodes, Joshua Novak, Bryan Spuhler

Abstract(s)

Family Religiosity, Parental Monitoring, and Emerging Adults’ Sexual Behavior

By Deirdre Quinn, Amy Lewin

Religion plays an important role in many people’s lives and can impact both physical and mental health; however, the processes through which families play a role in the religious and sexual socialization of children are varied and complex. This study of college students at a large, public university in the mid-Atlantic uses multidimensional measures of individual and family religiosity, sexual activity, and sexual risk behaviors to offer valuable insights into the role that families play in the religious and sexual choices made by emerging adults.

Objectives

To examine the relationships among family religiosity, parental monitoring during adolescence, emerging adults’ religiosity, and emerging adults’ sexual behaviorsTo address three major gaps in the current literature by using multidimensional measures of individual and family religiosity and separate constructs for sexual activity and sexual risk, and by considering the role of both family-level and individual-level predictors on emerging adults’ sexual decision-makingTo demonstrate the need for further rigorous research on the unique role of family influence on both emerging adults’ religiosity and their sexual behavior

Assessing the Relationship of Muslim and American Identity With Practices in Mate Selection

By Rafee Al-Mansur, Leigh Leslie

Muslim Americans may experience conflict between societal norms and the values of their religion with respect to mate selection. Whereas American norms prioritize autonomy and love, Muslim societies prioritize family and chastity. This study assesses the extent to which Muslim and American identities impact (1) the desire to involve family in mate selection and (2) willingness to enter romantic relationships without considering marriage. Researchers partnered with a popular Muslim matrimonial/dating app to survey users, resulting in 1,096 responses. Preliminary results suggest that while Muslim Americans are moving away from traditional mate selection practices, they are also not fully adopting American practices. Additional analyses are underway to examine the role of identity, age, and gender in the mate selection practices of Muslim Americans.

Objectives

1. To examine the role of Muslim identity and American identity in Muslim Americans' desire to have family involved in their mate selection process.2. To examine the role of Muslim identity and American identity in Muslim Americans' willingness to enter into romantic relationships without considering marriage.3. To examine how the relationship between identities and mate selection practices may vary as a result of age and gender.

Specific Aspects of Religiosity and Marital Attitudes: Differences by Age

By Hailey McClain, Marielle Jackson, Addison Elledge, Brandon Burr

Recent trends show that marriage and religion (specifically organized religion) may not be as important for emerging adults as before. Yet little research has investigated how specific aspects of religiosity impact attitudes toward marriage, and how these impacts may differ by age. Using a marital paradigms lens, this study investigated how the impact of organizational and non-organizational religiosity on marriage attitudes differed for those 30 and under and those over 30. Study results show that non-organizational religiosity had a greater impact for the 30 and under group, while organizational religiosity had a greater impact for the over 30 group.

Objectives

Participants will learn about trends in emerging adult attitudes toward marriage.
Participants will learn about trends in emerging adult attitudes toward religion.
Participants will learn about study results on how religiosity impacts attitudes toward marriage differently by age.

Predictors of Sexual Assertiveness Among Highly Religious Single Young Adults

By Mitchell Rhodes, Joshua Novak, Bryan Spuhler

Current literature on religion and sexuality neglect sexual behaviors among highly religious singles. Further, literature has yet to explore the impact of religion on thought processes that impact sexual behavior including fear of sex, sexual preoccupation, and sexual esteem. The purpose of this study is to test a model where sexual fear and preoccupation predict assertiveness through sexual esteem for highly religious males and females. A sample of 417 young adults were included in this study. A fully mediated model was found for males and a partially mediated model for females. Implications for educators and practitioners are discussed.

Objectives

To explore the predictors of sexual assertiveness for highly religious young adults. To analyze the mediating impacts of sexual esteem between fear of sexual relationships and sexual preoccupation on sexual assertiveness. To compare sexual assertiveness as an outcome for highly religious young adult men and women. 

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