Infertility, Pregnancy, and Transition Into Motherhood

Concurrent Sessions 2

Karina Shreffler, Stacy Tiemeyer, Meagan Meadows, Julia McQuillan, Arthur Greil, Allison Goderwis, Jason Hans, Carolyn Sutter, Barbara Fiese, Alexandra Lundquist, Erin Davis, Brent McBride, Sharon Donovan, Tiffany Spierling, Karina Shreffler, Tara Wyatt, Stacy Tiemeyer, Tristan Spierling, Elizabeth Finley, Jacob Christenson, Brandon Hollie, Casey McGregor, Joyce Arditti

Facilitator: Karina Shreffler

10:00 AM
11:15 AM
Location
Royal Palm 4
Session #
120
Session Type
Lightning Paper
Session Focus
  • Research
  • Practice
Organized By
  • Families & Health

About the Session

  • 120-01 - How Does Pregnancy Loss Affect the Importance of Motherhood to Women in the U.S.?
    By Karina Shreffler, Stacy Tiemeyer, Meagan Meadows, Julia McQuillan, Arthur Greil
  • 120-02 - Health Care Providers' Perceptions of Pregnant Women
    By Allison Goderwis, Jason Hans
  • 120-03 - Sources of Information and Support for Breastfeeding Mothers: Alignment With CDC Strategies and Associations With Child Feeding Method at 6 Weeks Postpartum
    By Carolyn Sutter, Barbara Fiese, Alexandra Lundquist, Erin Davis, Brent McBride, Sharon Donovan
  • 120-04 - Transition to Motherhood in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit
    By Tiffany Spierling, Karina Shreffler, Tara Wyatt, Stacy Tiemeyer, Tristan Spierling
  • 120-05 - Infertility and the Perceived Role of Males 
    By Elizabeth Finley, Jacob Christenson, Brandon Hollie
  • 120-06 - Young Mothers in Appalachia: The Role of Kin
    By Casey McGregor, Joyce Arditti

Abstract(s)

How Does Pregnancy Loss Affect the Importance of Motherhood to Women in the U.S.?

By Karina Shreffler, Stacy Tiemeyer, Meagan Meadows, Julia McQuillan, Arthur Greil

Although pregnancy loss is a relatively common experience, little is known about how the experience of pregnancy loss shapes how women think about motherhood. The National Survey of Fertility Barriers is a probability sample of U.S. women who are interviewed twice across three years. Change score analyses reveal that experiencing a pregnancy loss between waves is associated with an increase in importance of motherhood score. These findings have important theoretical implications for our understanding of factors that shape how women think about motherhood, as well as for research and practice on pregnancy loss.

Objectives

To increase awareness about the impact of pregnancy loss on women's perceptions about motherhood.To describe how two-wave panel data can be analyzed using change score analysis.To provide practitioners who work with women or couples who experience pregnancy loss understanding about factors that shape the experience and meaning of pregnancy loss.

Health Care Providers' Perceptions of Pregnant Women

By Allison Goderwis, Jason Hans

Health care providers’ (N = 421) implicit perceptions of pregnant women based on age, race or ethnicity, marital status, and socioeconomic status are assessed. Ordinal and binary regression analyses revealed that respondents felt more pity for an unmarried than married pregnant woman and more anger toward an unemployed pregnant woman without health insurance compared to a pregnant woman who was employed with health insurance. Male, Asian, and Hispanic respondents were less likely to help the pregnant woman, Black and protestant respondents were more likely to express some degree of anger toward the pregnant woman, and male and protestant respondents assigned more responsibility to the woman for her pregnancy.

Objectives

1. To analyze stigmatizing attitudes or behaviors associated with unintended pregnancy among health care providers.2. To demonstrate the extent to which health care providers' percetions of pregnant women differ specifically based on the woman's age, race or ethnicity, socioeconomic status, or marital status.3. To evaluate the extent to which Attribution Theory provides a useful framework for understanding stigma associated with pregnancy.

Sources of Information and Support for Breastfeeding Mothers: Alignment With CDC Strategies and Associations With Child Feeding Method at 6 Weeks Postpartum

By Carolyn Sutter, Barbara Fiese, Alexandra Lundquist, Erin Davis, Brent McBride, Sharon Donovan

To increase breastfeeding rates, information and support is needed from multiple sources. The current study examined 1) levels of information and support received within the framework of CDC-defined strategies for supporting breastfeeding mothers, 2) differences in rates of information and support accessed by demographics, and 3) associations with feeding method at six weeks postpartum. Findings from a sample of 447 women participating in the STRONG Kids 2 study indicate education and information supports were associated with greater odds of breastfeeding, but not all women received supports at the same rate. New approaches are needed to increase efficacy of information delivery.

Objectives

Examine the frequency at which women receive information and support from each source outlined in the CDC strategies to support breastfeeding mothersIdentify demographic differences in who receives support from each sourceDetermine associations between sources and feeding method (exclusive direct breastfeeding, exclusive breastfeeding of expressed milk, formula feeding, and combined feeding) at 6 weeks post-partum

Transition to Motherhood in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

By Tiffany Spierling, Karina Shreffler, Tara Wyatt, Stacy Tiemeyer, Tristan Spierling

The transition to motherhood can be challenging, particularly when newborns are admitted into a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). In this study, we examine reflections of pregnancy, birth, and postnatal experiences of 15 women following a NICU stay. We apply a survey-driven narrative construction technique, which entails converting structured and open-ended responses to survey questions into narratives and themes. Themes centered on stressful and positive pregnancy reflections; traumatic birth experiences and conflicting emotions; and care provision in the NICU. These findings suggest implications for policies and practices that enhance maternal well-being and the mother-infant bond following an infant’s NICU admittance.

Objectives

To understand variations in the meaning that new mothers assign to traumatic birth and postpartum experiences.To explore the usefulness of survey-driven narrative construction techniques to identify themes.To identify helpful practices and policies that practitioners can apply when working with families with newborns in the NICU.

Infertility and the Perceived Role of Males 

By Elizabeth Finley, Jacob Christenson, Brandon Hollie

There is a lack of research that focuses on the experience of males in regards to infertility. This phenomenological study was conducted to better understand the role men perceive they are given, and the role men want in the experience of infertility. The participants, recruited from infertily and gynecology clinics, were men and there partners currently seeking or involved in medical treatments for infertility. Five themes were identified: (1) Support system for partner, (2) reluctance of openness, (3) no change in self, (4) lack of influence, and lack of expectations. Clinical implications for these findings are offered. 

Objectives

To demonstrate the importance of togetherness in regards to infertiltyTo  evaluate the perceived role of males in regards to infertility To analyze infertility from a systemic perspective 

Young Mothers in Appalachia: The Role of Kin

By Casey McGregor, Joyce Arditti

Despite overall declines in pregnancies amongst adolescents aged 15 to 19, rural regions of the U.S. maintain the highest rates of “teenage” childbearing and yet much of current young parenting literature focuses on urban locales. Potentially limited access to resources aimed at supporting young parents in the Appalachian region may lead to families employing adaptive measures to ensure familial wellbeing and survival. The current study, guided by the kinscripts framework and grounded theory methods, explores negotiations and exchanges of caregiving roles, and other family dynamics within rural Appalachian families in which there was a young mother. 

Objectives

1. To analyze family expectations, norms, and sanctions in relation to young childbearing in rural Appalachia. 2. To describe roles and the negotiation of kin-work responsibilities regarding young childbearing and caregiving in rural Appalachian families. 3. To examine the nature of interdependent lives within Appalachian kin networks. 

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Conference Session