Influence Adolescents' Transition to Early Adulthood and Beyond 

Concurrent Sessions 9

Joyce Serido, Ashley B. LeBaron, Jessie Rudi, E. Jeffrey Hill, Bryce L. Jorgensen, Jakob F. Jensen, Ashley B. LeBaron, E. Jeffrey Hill, Xiaohui Sophie Li, Chanran Seo, Clinton G. Gudmunson, Brandan Wheeler, E. Jeffrey Hill, Emily Parrott, Patrick Cheek, Kathleen Gillon, Emily Koochel, Melinda Stafford - Markham, Hailey Holmgren, Jodi Dworkin

Facilitator: Erron Huey

1:30 PM
2:45 PM
Location
Royal Palm 1
Session #
332
Session Type
Lightning Paper
Session Focus
  • Research
Organized By
  • Education & Enrichment

About the Session

  • 332-01 - Early Parental Control and Young Adult Financial Autonomy: The Role of Adolescent Self-Regulation
    By Joyce Serido, Ashley B. LeBaron, Jessie Rudi, E. Jeffrey Hill
  • 332-02 - To Spend or Not to Spend: Where Do Emerging Adults Learn to Manage Money?
    By Bryce L. Jorgensen, Jakob F. Jensen, Ashley B. LeBaron, E. Jeffrey Hill
  • 332-03 - Intergenerational Association in Financial Distress
    By Xiaohui Sophie Li, Chanran Seo, Clinton G. Gudmunson, Brandan Wheeler, E. Jeffrey Hill
  • 332-04 - Parental Relationships Among First- Versus Continuing-Generation College Graduates: Differences in Financial Support
    By Emily Parrott
  • 332-05 - Parent-Child Relationships and University Participation in Rural Families
    By Patrick Cheek, Kathleen Gillon
  • 332-06 - Money and Marital Satisfaction in Emerging Adults: Are We Saying Enough?
    By Emily Koochel, Melinda Stafford - Markham
  • 332-07 - Parenting an Adult Child: Associations Between Parental Involvement and Autonomy Granting and Online Risk-Taking Behaviors in Emerging Adulthood
    By Hailey Holmgren, Jodi Dworkin

Abstract(s)

Early Parental Control and Young Adult Financial Autonomy: The Role of Adolescent Self-Regulation

By Joyce Serido, Ashley B. LeBaron, Jessie Rudi, E. Jeffrey Hill

During the transition to adulthood, young adults become more financially independent. But how do they learn this? Our symposium presents new and exciting research to family educators so that they are well-equipped to engage families across the socioeconomic strata. Paper 1 examines the role that parenting play in young adult financial stress. Paper 2 finds that work is also linked to responsible spending behaviors. Paper 3 discusses how young adults inherit financial stress from their parents. Paper 4 finds that some financially support their parents. Though we do not evaluate programs directly, we draw out key takeaways for family life educators and other practitioners who work with families. Further, we invite discussion on how to translate our findings into useful programming and policy intervention.

Objectives

To report on the constructs that matter the most for young adults during their transition to young adulthood and achievement of financial independence.To introduce new research on the topic, highlighting key takeaways from each study that are important for educators and practitioners working with families across the socioeconomic strata.To discuss how our research may translate into useful programming and policy interventions.

To Spend or Not to Spend: Where Do Emerging Adults Learn to Manage Money?

By Bryce L. Jorgensen, Jakob F. Jensen, Ashley B. LeBaron, E. Jeffrey Hill

Intergenerational Association in Financial Distress

By Xiaohui Sophie Li, Chanran Seo, Clinton G. Gudmunson, Brandan Wheeler, E. Jeffrey Hill

Parental Relationships Among First- Versus Continuing-Generation College Graduates: Differences in Financial Support

By Emily Parrott

Parent-Child Relationships and University Participation in Rural Families

By Patrick Cheek, Kathleen Gillon

The goal of this study is to explore the role family relationships have in the university participation of rural students in New England.  Utilizing family systems theory, it examines how family relationships shape decisions for rural students to pursue a university education, and how these relationships influence these students’ persistence once they begin a university education.  This study is qualitative by design and consists of a sample of 10 individuals who are pursuing a university education and self-identify as having a rural identity.  Preliminary findings and implications are discussed. 

Objectives

Understand the role of parental involvement in rural students’ university participation.
Understand the role of rural identity in rural students’ university matriculation decisions.
Understand the unique strengths and challenges of rural family systems as they apply to educational attainment.  

Money and Marital Satisfaction in Emerging Adults: Are We Saying Enough?

By Emily Koochel, Melinda Stafford - Markham

As emerging adults look to get married communication is key; however, disclosure of finances may be difficult for couples. To better understand the role of effective communication regarding finances, as it related to marital satisfaction, a sample of 75 married individuals in their first 5 years of their first marriage completed an online survey measuring communication, financial transparency, and marital satisfaction. Using hierarchal multiple regression, communication was found to account for 18% of the variance in marital satisfaction, and financial transparency accounted for an additional 5% of the variance. Implications for practitioners will be discussed.

Objectives

To analyze the role of effective communication regarding finances as it relates to marital satisfaction. To analyze the predictive quality of financial transparency in marital satisfaction of emerging adutls. To evaluate the importance of early education on financial communication in emerging adult relationships. 

Parenting an Adult Child: Associations Between Parental Involvement and Autonomy Granting and Online Risk-Taking Behaviors in Emerging Adulthood

By Hailey Holmgren, Jodi Dworkin

This study seeks to understand parenting in emerging adulthood by identifying clusters of parents based on involvement and autonomy support, and associations between parenting and online risk-taking (engaging in potentially harmful behaviors online). Participants included 339 emerging adults, reporting on parenting (separately for mothers and fathers) and online risk-taking behaviors. Results suggest that emerging adults with both parents high in involvement and autonomy support were less likely to engage in sexual risk-taking than youth reporting other parenting types. Discussion focuses on the importance of parents in emerging adulthood, and the need to examine multiple risk-taking and parenting behaviors.  

Objectives

1. To identify clusters of parents at varying levels of parental involvement and autonomy support
2. To examine associations between parental involvement and autonomy support and online risk-taking behavior3. To extend the literature on parenting and emerging adulthood

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