Intimate Partner Violence

Concurrent Sessions 5

Heather Love, Chelsea Spencer, Scott May, Sandra Stith, Hans Saint-Eloi Cadely, Sylvie Mrug, Michael Windle, Julia Hammett, David Kennedy, Benjamin Karney, Thomas Bradbury, Olena Kopystynska, Melissa Barnett, Connie Beck, Melissa Curran

Facilitator: Megan Haselschwerdt

8:30 AM
9:45 AM
Location
Royal Palm 5 and 6
Session #
216
Session Type
Paper
Session Focus
  • Research
Organized By
  • Research & Theory

About the Session

  • 216-01 - Perpetrator Risk Markers for Intimate Terrorism: A Meta-Analysis
    By Heather Love, Chelsea Spencer, Scott May, Sandra Stith
  • 216-02 - Different Contexts of Violence Exposure Relating to Dating Violence
    By Hans Saint-Eloi Cadely, Sylvie Mrug, Michael Windle
  • 216-03 - Situational Couple Violence: When Does It Lead to Long-Term Harm?
    By Julia Hammett, David Kennedy, Benjamin Karney, Thomas Bradbury
  • 216-04 - Parents’ Destructive Conflict, Violence, and Child Emotional Insecurity
    By Olena Kopystynska, Melissa Barnett, Connie Beck, Melissa Curran

Abstract(s)

Perpetrator Risk Markers for Intimate Terrorism: A Meta-Analysis

By Heather Love, Chelsea Spencer, Scott May, Sandra Stith

Michael Johnson created a typology of intimate partner violence (IPV) which included two primary types of violence: situational couple violence (SCV) and intimate terrorism (IT). Johnson proposed that IT is more likely to be found in clinical samples compared to general population samples. This meta-analysis examines the differences in strengths of IPV risk markers’ in clinical and non-clinical samples of male perpetrators. Control, power, jealousy, and patriarchal beliefs were all significantly stronger risk markers for IPV in clinical samples than in non-clinical samples. Findings support Johnson’s proposition that control variables are more highly related to IT than to SCV.

Objectives

To determine whether elements of control in intimate partner violence are significantly different in intimate terrorism compared to situational couple violence.To discern whether intimate terrorism is more likely to be identified in clinical samples compared to general population samples.To impact policy and future research based on how intimate terrorism differs from situational couple violence.

Different Contexts of Violence Exposure Relating to Dating Violence

By Hans Saint-Eloi Cadely, Sylvie Mrug, Michael Windle

The present study examines the relationship between exposure to violence across various contexts (home, school, and community) and dating violence among adolescents. The analysis sample consists of 638 adolescents. Reports of exposure to violence in these contexts were collected in early adolescence whereas dating violence data were collected in late adolescence. Results showed that having witnessed violence more consistently predicted dating violence relative to being victimized from violence across these contexts. Additionally, being exposed to violence in the home had the strongest relationship with dating violence compared to being exposed to violence in other contexts.

Objectives

To examine the relationships between exposure to violence across various contexts and dating violence.To compare the strengths of the relationships between exposure to violence across various contexts and dating violence.To compare the strengths of the relationships between types of exposure to violence across various contexts and dating violence.

Situational Couple Violence: When Does It Lead to Long-Term Harm?

By Julia Hammett, David Kennedy, Benjamin Karney, Thomas Bradbury

Intimate Partner Violence is among the greatest public health challenges of our time. Helping couples in need requires clear understanding of the specific factors that increase a couple’s risk for experiencing negative outcomes once violence has occurred. Using a sample of 231 ethnically and culturally diverse newlyweds living with low incomes, the current study examines whether the composition and structure of partners’ shared social networks strengthen or weaken the association between situational couple violence and individual and couple well-being over time. Support for the importance of social networks would suggest new prevention and intervention strategies for supporting situationally violent couples.

Objectives

To identify longitudinal associations between situational couple violence and negative physical and mental health consequences.To evaluate whether partners’ shared social networks influence the strength of association between situational couple violence and negative physical and mental health consequences.To demonstrate the usefulness of addressing couples’ social networks as targets of change in prevention and intervention programs for couples suffering from situational couple violence. 

Parents’ Destructive Conflict, Violence, and Child Emotional Insecurity

By Olena Kopystynska, Melissa Barnett, Connie Beck, Melissa Curran

Using child emotional security hypothesis, we examined the link between destructive interparental conflict, intimate partner violence (IPV), and child emotional insecurity for mothers and fathers. Children were 36-months old. Participants (N=5,343) were mothers and fathers in a romantic relationship, who were primarily unmarried at recruitment and low-income, reported on each other’s destructive conflict and violent behaviors, and their children’s emotional insecurity. Mothers’ and fathers’ destructive conflict was positively associated with children’s emotional insecurity, but only mothers’ report of IPV was negatively related to children’s emotional insecurity. Implications of destructive conflict and IPV that varies by parent gender on child development are discussed.  

Objectives

1. Research demonstrating complex relations between destructive interparental conflict, intimate partner violence, and children's emotional insecurity.2. Secondary data analysis: data drawn from the Building Strong Families project that focused on unmarried and low-income couples who were expecting their first child together.3. Aplication of unique statistical procedures, such as path analysis in Mplus, to study conflict, intimate partner violence, and children's emotional insecurity

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Conference Session