Parenting Processes in Different Countries

Concurrent Sessions 9

Shana Pribesh, Matthew Usevitch, Kaijsa Angerhofer Heninger, Elizabeth Koch Sigler, Yuanyuan Yue, Mikaela Dufur, Jon Jarvis, Kristie Rowley, Nadia Moratto-Vasquez, Paulina Velez-Gomez, Holly Follmer, Sara Dodd, Jianmin Shao, Esther Chang, gonul kuscul, Hasan Deniz, Pinar Demirci, Rochelle Dalla, Jessie Peter, Sarah Erwin

Facilitator: Grace Chung

1:30 PM
2:45 PM
Location
Royal Palm 5 and 6
Session #
336
Session Type
Lightning Paper
Session Focus
  • Research
  • Practice
Organized By
  • International

About the Session

  • 336-01 - Family Structure and Transitions of Australian Families
    By Shana Pribesh, Matthew Usevitch, Kaijsa Angerhofer Heninger, Elizabeth Koch Sigler, Yuanyuan Yue, Mikaela Dufur, Jon Jarvis, Kristie Rowley
  • 336-02 - Accompanying Youth Development: Perspectives from Colombian Families
    By Nadia Moratto-Vasquez, Paulina Velez-Gomez, Holly Follmer, Sara Dodd
  • 336-03 - It's My Own Life: Negotiating Parental Support and Acceptance Among Chinese LGBQ Young Adults
    By Jianmin Shao, Esther Chang
  • 336-04 - Father Support Program: An Example From Turkey
    By gonul kuscul, Hasan Deniz, Pinar Demirci
  • 336-05 - Parents as Perpetrators:  Intergenerational Sex Trafficking in Rural India
    By Rochelle Dalla, Jessie Peter, Sarah Erwin

Abstract(s)

Family Structure and Transitions of Australian Families

By Shana Pribesh, Matthew Usevitch, Kaijsa Angerhofer Heninger, Elizabeth Koch Sigler, Yuanyuan Yue, Mikaela Dufur, Jon Jarvis, Kristie Rowley

Recent family structure research has focused on fragile and turbulent families. In this study, we use data visualization techniques to describe the family structures and transitions children in Australia experience. We find that most family structures in Australia are stable over time, contrary to assumptions driven by examinations of US data.

Objectives

To examine family structure and transitions in Australia.To use data visualization techniques to enhance our understanding of family structure and transition.To highlight the stability of family structure over time while defining the most turbulent family structures.

Accompanying Youth Development: Perspectives from Colombian Families

By Paulina Velez-Gomez, Holly Follmer, Nadia Moratto-Vasquez, Sara Dodd

This paper derives from a larger research project aiming to adapt and implement a leadership development program for youth in Colombia. We present results from focus groups with parents and adolescents from a private urban school in Colombia. The paper explores the meanings and nuances of an emergent concept from the focus groups: The concept of accompaniment (acompañamiento). Accompaniment is seen as a commitment to work towards a common cause -- the integral development of the person and strengthening individual capacities. Findings are discussed against other conceptualizations of accompaniment from researchers in Latin America. We analyze the implications of findings for potential cultural adaptations to the program.

Objectives

1. To explore the meanings and nuances of the concept accompaniment.2. To analyze the implications of this concept for potential cultural adaptations to a leadership development program for Colombian youth. 3. To contrast results from the study with other conceptualizations of accompaniment.

It's My Own Life: Negotiating Parental Support and Acceptance Among Chinese LGBQ Young Adults

By Jianmin Shao, Esther Chang

Few studies have focused on sexual minority individuals' negotiations of parental acceptance and support and their potential responses to unsupportive family environments. Even fewer studies have examined such processes in the sociocultural context of China. Drawing on social ecological theory and queer theory, the current study applied thematic analysis to qualitative data from semi-structured in-depth interviews conducted with 47 LGBQ young adults (20 cisgender women) in China. Results showed that Chinese LGBQ young adults were capable of negotiating their sexual identities and exhibiting individual agency in response to unsupportive and unaccepting family environments.  Sub-themes of types of parental acceptance/unacceptance and forms of individual negotiations will be discussed in details within the sociocultural context of globalizing China.  

Objectives

To examine types of parental support for sexual minroty young adults in China.To demonstrate individual agency and resilience among sexual minority young adults.To capture sociocultural factors shaping relations between parents and sexual minority young adults.

Father Support Program: An Example From Turkey

By gonul kuscul, Hasan Deniz, Pinar Demirci

One significant way to support father-child relationships is providing quality fatherhood interventions to promote the involvement of fathers. This paper aims to evaluate the impact of a Father Support Program implemented by a Turkish NGO (Mother Child Education Foundation - MOCEF) in Turkey.  In this research, three outcome variables were focused: (1) democratic parental attitudes and skills (2) attitudes for gender equality, and (3) attitudes toward domestic and gender-based violence. The research consisted of quantitative and qualitative components. While a single group without a control group was used with a pretest/posttest design in the quantitative study (202 fathers), in the qualitative part, focus group meetings were held.  Effective and ineffective outcomes of the program and further improvement areas will be discussed. 

Objectives

1- To evaluate the effectiveness of the Father Support Program.2- To discuss the effective and ineffective sides of the Program.3- To demonstrate a cross-cultural example.

Parents as Perpetrators:  Intergenerational Sex Trafficking in Rural India

By Rochelle Dalla, Jessie Peter, Sarah Erwin

In rural villages of central and north India, caste-based prostitution determines the life course trajectories for thousands of women and girls.  The Bedia comprise one such caste.  In-depth interviews were conducted with thirty-one Bedia females (aged 16 to 66) who were either engaged in or retired from the commercial sex industry.  Interviews focused on cultural traditions associated with sex work, familial processes involved in the intergenerational commercial sexual exploitation of Bedia girls, and financial obligations of "working" bedia.  Results are presented and implications for practice and policy are described.

Objectives

Following this presentation, audience members will be able to:1.  Identify cultural traditions and practices associated with caste-based prostitution among the Bedia; 2. Describe familial processes involved in the commercial sexual exploitation of Bedia girls; and3.  Discuss familial financial obligations that maintain participants' involvement in the commercial sex industry.

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