The Role of Families in Promoting the Well-Being of Latinx Youth

Concurrent Sessions 10

Flavia Crovetto, Stephanie Nguyen, Alyson Shapiro, Vanja Lazarevic, Anayeli Lopez, Begzsuren Bolormaa, Khadija Alqurashi, Melissa Bishop, Omhagain Dayeen, Lorena Aceves, Griselda Martinez, Mayra Bamaca-Colbert, Amanda Griffin, Micheal Sulkowski, Hobart Cleveland, Dumayi Gutierrez

Discussant/Faciliator: Veronica R. Barrios

3:00 PM
4:15 PM
Location
Royal Palm 2
Session #
341
Session Type
Paper
Session Focus
  • Research
Organized By
  • Ethnic Minorities

About the Session

  • 341-01 - Family Dynamics Moderate the Impact of Discrimination on Well-Being for Latino Young Adults
    By Flavia Crovetto, Stephanie Nguyen, Alyson Shapiro, Vanja Lazarevic
  • 341-02 - Predictors of Self-Esteem Among Children of Mexican Immigrants: An Examination of Well-Being Through an Ecological Systems Perspective
    By Anayeli Lopez, Begzsuren Bolormaa, Khadija Alqurashi, Melissa Bishop, Omhagain Dayeen
  • 341-03 - Latinx Homeless Youth: Familism, Ethnic Identity, and Daily Affect
    By Lorena Aceves, Griselda Martinez, Mayra Bamaca-Colbert, Amanda Griffin, Micheal Sulkowski, Hobart Cleveland
  • 341-04 - Intersecting Queer and Latinx Families: Core Sources of Support and Resilience for Marginalized Bisexual Latinx Women
    By Dumayi Gutierrez

Abstract(s)

Family Dynamics Moderate the Impact of Discrimination on Well-Being for Latino Young Adults

By Flavia Crovetto, Stephanie Nguyen, Alyson Shapiro, Vanja Lazarevic

The current study examined the effects of discrimination on mental health and well-being of Latino young adults. In addition, we explored the ways in which various aspects of family relationships can serve as protective or risk factors for Latino youth who experience discrimination and depression. We collected data from 257 Latino young adults (Mage = 22.38, SD = 2.45), with the majority of participants (81.7%) being female and second-generation immigrants (73.7%). Our findings show that positive aspects of family dynamics buffered the effects of discrimination on mental health and life satisfaction, whereas negative aspects of family dynamics compounded the negative effects of discrimination. The implications of these findings will be discussed in detail.

Objectives

The objectives of this study are:(1) to examine how experiences of discrimination relate to mental health and well-being of Latino young adults. (2) to explore which aspects of parent-child relationships might serve as protective factors against discrimination, and which aspects might serve as risk factors that could compound the negative effects of discrimination. (3) to explore recommendations for researchers and practitioners working with vulnerable populations.

Predictors of Self-Esteem Among Children of Mexican Immigrants: An Examination of Well-Being Through an Ecological Systems Perspective

By Anayeli Lopez, Begzsuren Bolormaa, Khadija Alqurashi, Melissa Bishop, Omhagain Dayeen

This study examines individual, familial, and societal predictors associated with the self-esteem of Mexican immigrant adolescents and how some of these predictors interact in different systems jointly. Hierarchical linear regression analyses were conducted drawing data from the Children of Immigrants Longitudinal Study. The results indicated that academic achievement, bilingualism, and family cohesion were positively associated with self-esteem, while parent-adolescent conflict and societal discrimination were negatively associated with self-esteem. Additionally, bilingualism buffered the negative effects of societal discrimination while greater parent-adolescent conflict exacerbated the negative effects of societal discrimination. Practice implications and recommendations for future research were discussed.

Objectives

1. To analyze the predictors of self-esteem among children of Mexican immigrants from an ecological systems perspective.2. To examine how bilingualism can buffer the negative effects of perceived societal discrimination on Mexican immigrant adolescents’ self-esteem.3. To examine how family factors such as family cohesion and parent-child conflict can buffer or exacerbate the effects of perceived societal discrimination on Mexican immigrant adolescents’ self-esteem.

Latinx Homeless Youth: Familism, Ethnic Identity, and Daily Affect

By Lorena Aceves, Griselda Martinez, Mayra Bamaca-Colbert, Amanda Griffin, Micheal Sulkowski, Hobart Cleveland

Drawing data from an ecological momentary assessment (EMA) study on homeless youth (N=64 Latinx), multilevel modeling was used to examine the effects of daily positive school experiences, familism (i.e., familial values around support and referents), and ethnic-identity on positive and negative end of day affect. Findings revealed that daily positive school experiences predicted positive and negative end of day affect. Findings also revealed that familism and ethnic identity resolution are critical for end of day positive and negative affect. This study highlights the importance of cultural-related domains for Latinx homeless youth’s daily affect despite an insecure home life.

Objectives

1) To analyze the effects of daily school experiences for Latinx homeless youth's daily affect.2) To evaluate the role of familial and ethnic values for Latinx homeless youth's daliy school experiences and affect. 3) To gain a better understanding of Latinx homeless youth due to the limited research on this unique population.

Intersecting Queer and Latinx Families: Core Sources of Support and Resilience for Marginalized Bisexual Latinx Women

By Dumayi Gutierrez

Research has primarily focused on gay and lesbian Latinx individuals, leaving out voices of bisexual Latinx women and family influence. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore experiences of support in biological families, queer families and resiliency outcomes of marginalized bisexual Latinx women. This study used 10 semi structured interviews with bisexual Latinx women between the ages of 18-30. Ethnicities included Mexican (n=7), Dominican (n=2) and Venezuelan (n=1). Through thematic analysis, three themes developed: (a) experiences of support in Latinx families, (b) experiences of belonging in queer families and (c) what resiliency encompasses for bisexual Latinx women. Participants discussed the importance of family, however created, and discussed resources that would further promote resiliency outcomes. Implications for clinicians and Latinx intersectionality practice are discussed.

Objectives

To demonstrate how biological and queer families have fostered empowerment and resiliency for bisexual Latinx women.
To demonstrate an integrative sociocultural approach when working with marginalized multiple identity communities.
To promote education and awareness to intersecting ethnic, gender and sexual orientation identities for bisexual Latinx women.  

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