Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity

Concurrent Sessions 1

Lindsay Edwards, Katelyn Coburn, Christi McGeorge, Mary Nedela, Heather Beeson

Facilitator: Ashley Walsdorf

 

8:30 AM
9:45 AM
Location
Pacific Salon 3
Session #
112
Session Type
Paper
Session Focus
  • Research
  • Practice
Organized By
  • Family Therapy

About the Session

  • 112-01 - Scale of Internalized Trans Stigma (SITS): Measure Development and Initial Validation
    By Lindsay Edwards
  • 112-02 - Working with LBG Clients: Christian Pastors’ Advice to Family Therapists
    By Katelyn Coburn, Christi McGeorge
  • 112-03 - Factors Associated With Comfort in Racial and Ethnic Communities Among Bisexual People of Color
    By Mary Nedela
  • 112-04 - Development of a Relationship Education Curriculum for LGBTQIA Couples
    By Heather Beeson

Abstract(s)

Scale of Internalized Trans Stigma (SITS): Measure Development and Initial Validation

By Lindsay Edwards

Published measures of internalized transphobia often include cis normative and shame based items. These measures have also been developed with cis gender participants. This study uses data from transgender participants to create a measure of internalized trans stigma that uses inclusive language and assesses resiliency dimensions of internalized stigma. The Scale of Internalized Trans Stigma (SITS) includes 28 items organized into four subscales: Stigma Resistance, Gender Confidence, Gender Openness, and Comfort with Trans Community. The SITS can be for research on stigma, by clinicians to inform the direction of clinical work with transgender clients, and to track clinical progress.

Objectives

To articulate the psychometric properties of the Scale of Internalized Trans Stigma (SITS) and establish the reliability and validity of the scale.For attendees to leave with a measure they can use in their clinical practice with transgender clients to guide intervention and track progress.For attendees to leave with a measure they can use to study internalized trans stigma and its effect on transgender individuals health outcomes.

Working with LBG Clients: Christian Pastors’ Advice to Family Therapists

By Katelyn Coburn, Christi McGeorge

This qualitative study explored the advice affirmative pastors would give to family therapists about working with LGB individuals and their families. Twenty-one pastors who identified as LGB affirmative to varying extents and were leading mainstream Christian congregations (e.g., Lutheran, Methodist, Episcopal) were interviewed. Thematic analysis identified the following themes: (1) Be willing to see religion and pastors as a source of support for LGB clients; (2) Don’t use religion to shame LGB clients, (3) Set aside personal harmful religious beliefs, and (4) Support families in developing loving and caring stances towards their LGB family members. Clinical implications will be discussed.

Objectives

To utilize advice from LGB affirmative pastors to improve their competency to work with LGB clients.
To utilize self-of-the-therapist strategies to explore their own potential religious biases and heteronormative assumptions.
To better utilize pastors and religious communities as a resource for LGB clients.

Factors Associated With Comfort in Racial and Ethnic Communities Among Bisexual People of Color

By Mary Nedela

Bisexual individuals are a sexual minority, and are also considered a minority even within the LGBTQ+ community. Sexual minority people of color are further marginalized in these communities (Akerlund & Cheung, 2000), and the stress associated with minority status is further compounded with racial/ethnic minority status (Ghabrial, 2017; Kim & Fredriksen-Goldsen, 2012). Results of path modeling indicated that identity salience (both sexual orientation and racial/ethnic status), homophobia, level of outness, and levels of happiness impact comfort in racial/ethnic communities for bisexual people of color. Implications for practioners and future directions will be provided. 

Objectives

1) To identify factors influencing bisexual individuals’ comfort in their larger communities.
2) To identify unique stressors affecting bisexual people of color.
3) To enhance my cultural competence with self-identifying bisexual individuals.

Development of a Relationship Education Curriculum for LGBTQIA Couples

By Heather Beeson

Relationship education provides preventative measures through early intervention to strengthen relationships; however, few programs have been developed or adapted for the LGBTQIA community. One approach that has specifically examined this community empirically is Gottman Method Couples Therapy (GMCT). This presentation will use GMCT approach as a framework for group relationship education curriculum designed for the specific needs of the LGBTQIA community. Some needs explored include coming out, internalized homophobia, relationship roles, and managing social stigma. Developing relationship education curriculum will fill an important need for this community and provide a resource to educators desiring to effectively work within this population.

Objectives

1. Understand the unique differences between heterosexual couples and LGBTQIA couples2. Understand how the Gottman Method Couples Therapy Approach can be adapted to a relationship education group for LGBTQIA couples3. Examine the benefits of relationship education for LGBTQIA couples

Bundle name
Conference Session