Violence, Abuse, and Family Therapy

Concurrent Sessions 6

Veronica Barrios, Jonathan Caspi, Pauline Garcia_Reid, Katia Goldfarb, Jason Whiting, Doug Smith, Ashley Lovell, Emily Stephens, Lauren Ruhlmann, Taylor Gnagi, Bridgett Kelly, Megan Miller, Caroline Fuss, Sarah Jane Fuss, Danielle Parson, Emma Milan, Mallory Williams, Taylor Ronquillo, Rachel Bezek, Michael Schiferl, Amber Dunn, Jamie Dressler, Sarah Wolford, Ashley Cooper, Lenore McWey

Facilitator: Amber Vennum

 

1:30 PM
2:45 PM
Location
Royal Palm 3
Session #
232
Session Type
Paper
Session Focus
  • Research
  • Practice
Organized By
  • Family Therapy

About the Session

  • 232-01 - My Sister’s Keeper: Survivors’ Experiences Disclosing Sexual Abuse to a Sibling
    By Veronica Barrios, Jonathan Caspi, Pauline Garcia_Reid, Katia Goldfarb
  • 232-02 - Couples’ Experiences of a Brief Therapeutic Intervention for Domestic Violence: A Grounded Theory Analysis
    By Jason Whiting, Doug Smith, Ashley Lovell, Emily Stephens
  • 232-03 - Sex Trafficking Survivors’ Perspectives on Transition and Recovery Services
    By Lauren Ruhlmann, Taylor Gnagi, Bridgett Kelly, Megan Miller, Caroline Fuss, Sarah Jane Fuss, Danielle Parson, Emma Milan, Mallory Williams, Taylor Ronquillo, Rachel Bezek, Michael Schiferl, Amber Dunn, Jamie Dressler
  • 232-04 - Maternal Depression, Maltreatment History, and Child Outcomes: The Role of Harsh Parenting
    By Sarah Wolford, Ashley Cooper, Lenore McWey

Abstract(s)

My Sister’s Keeper: Survivors’ Experiences Disclosing Sexual Abuse to a Sibling

By Veronica Barrios, Jonathan Caspi, Pauline Garcia_Reid, Katia Goldfarb

This study explores sexual abuse disclosure processes in sibling relationships and  whether or not the sibling relationship is viewed as supportive during the disclosure. This study also examines some of the family dynamics which may be in place to prevent or encourage disclosure by examining disclosure within the sibling dyad. Constant comparative analysis was used to analyze ten female survivors' responses in a semi-structured interview. Findings demonstrate that all survivors disclosed to someone, but not always within their family. Nonetheless, disclosure to siblings was a supportive experience more often than not. Implications for research and practice are provided. 

Objectives

To analyze the family dynamics that inhibit or promote sexual abuse disclosure. To analyze the impact of sexual abuse disclosure on sibling relationships. To report what factors survivors of sexual abuse view as supportive when disclosing their abuse.

Couples’ Experiences of a Brief Therapeutic Intervention for Domestic Violence: A Grounded Theory Analysis

By Jason Whiting, Doug Smith, Ashley Lovell, Emily Stephens

This study used grounded theory methods to examine the experience of participants in a brief intervention for domestic violence. Partners were interviewed individually to rule out those with controlling or severe violence, and then attended a two-session (four hours total) intervention to help them recognize escalating patterns, plan for safety, use negotiated time outs, and understand the costs of abuse in their relationship. Results of the analysis show a process of change in awareness, behaviors (including skill development) and emotions. These changes were generally reported as beneficial for participants and offer implications for therapists and researchers.

Objectives

Understand the components of a brief intervention for non-controlling domestic violence.See a process model describing typical client’s experiences with the intervention.Understand how to apply the intervention components in their own therapy processes.

Sex Trafficking Survivors’ Perspectives on Transition and Recovery Services

By Lauren Ruhlmann, Taylor Gnagi, Bridgett Kelly, Megan Miller, Caroline Fuss, Sarah Jane Fuss, Danielle Parson, Emma Milan, Mallory Williams, Taylor Ronquillo, Rachel Bezek, Michael Schiferl, Amber Dunn, Jamie Dressler

Estimates suggest that at any given time, upwards of 40 million people around the world are victims of human trafficking. Commercial sexual exploitation is one of the most common forms of human trafficking and it has been linked to adverse biopsychosocial health outcomes. Despite the influx in global advocacy and intervention initiatives, post-trafficking resources for survivors are sparse. The purpose of this qualitative phenomenological study was to begin exploring 1) survivors' experiences during their transition out of the commercial sex trade, and 2) what services they believe would best support the transition and long-term recovery of future survivors.

Objectives

To identify survivors of sex trafficking in clinical practice/intervention programsTo describe challenges facing survivors as they transition out of the commercial sex tradeTo apply sex trafficking survivors’ recommendations for improved transition and recovery services to clinical practice/intervention programs

Maternal Depression, Maltreatment History, and Child Outcomes: The Role of Harsh Parenting

By Sarah Wolford, Ashley Cooper, Lenore McWey

Researchers examined harsh parenting practices as a means of explaining the association between maternal depression and negative child outcomes among mothers who experienced child abuse. Mediation analyses were conducted with mother-child dyads at separate time points (child age 6: n = 325; youth age 12: n = 213) using the LONGSCAN dataset. Maternal depressive symptoms predicted child internalizing and externalizing symptoms at both ages. According to results, mothers’ reported use of psychological and physical aggression with their children (age 6) and youth (age 12) partially explained the relationship between maternal depression and child behavior. Clinical implications are discussed.

Objectives

1. To reflect the current state of knowledge on maternal depression, maltreatment history and child outcomes and highlight gaps in the literature
2. To discern the association of maternal depression and child outcomes in a sample of women who were maltreated as children
3. To illustrate how parenting interventions may serve as a mechanism of change in the reduction of harsh parenting practices and negative child outcomes

Bundle name
Conference Session