What Are Ways to Help Couples Create Strong Relationships?

Concurrent Sessions 5

Nathan Stoddard, Chelsea Garneau-Rosner, Melissa Herzog, Stephen Duncan, Chongming Yang, Ian Marsee, Daye Son, Bryan Spuhler, Kay Bradford, Joshua Novak, Brian Higginbotham, Julianne McGill, Leah Burke, Francesca Adler-Baeder

Facilitator: Karen Myers-Bowman

8:30 AM
9:45 AM
Location
Pacific Salon 2
Session #
211
Session Type
Paper
Session Focus
  • Research
  • Practice
Organized By
  • Education & Enrichment

About the Session

  • 211-01 - The Role of Concept Application and Enrollment Motivation in Improvement After a CRE Program
    By Nathan Stoddard, Chelsea Garneau-Rosner, Melissa Herzog
  • 211-02 - Comparatively Evaluating Marriage and Relationship Education Methods
    By Stephen Duncan, Chongming Yang, Ian Marsee, Daye Son
  • 211-03 - Hitting the Mark: A Latent Trajectory Analysis of Relationship Quality Across a Stepfamily Education Course
    By Bryan Spuhler, Kay Bradford, Joshua Novak, Brian Higginbotham
  • 211-04 - The Dyadic Influences of Mindfulness on Relationship Quality
    By Julianne McGill, Leah Burke, Francesca Adler-Baeder

Abstract(s)

The Role of Concept Application and Enrollment Motivation in Improvement After a CRE Program

By Nathan Stoddard, Chelsea Garneau-Rosner, Melissa Herzog

Dosage is an important to the efficacy of couple relationship education (CRE) programs. However, the cognitive-behavioral perspective suggests that applying material is also an essential ingredient for change. Examining 246 couples who completed community-based CRE, we found that application predicted change in proximal (i.e., friendship) and distal (i.e., relationship satisfaction) outcomes. Intrinsic motivation and commitment also play a role in application and therefore in change. Thus, getting participants through the door is not enough for them to experience improvements in their relationships. CRE participants must also apply what they learn to their relationships. Implications for practitioners are discussed.

Objectives

To examine the role of program dosage and concept application in proximal and distal relational change as a result of couple relationship education (CRE) programs.
To examine the role of participant enrollment motivation and baseline relationship commitment in concept application and dosage in CRE programs.
To emphasize for practitioners the importance of concept application and enrollment motivation for relational change in CRE programs.

Comparatively Evaluating Marriage and Relationship Education Methods

By Stephen Duncan, Chongming Yang, Ian Marsee, Daye Son

Marriage and relationship education (MRE) has been shown to be effective in producing reliable positive changes in relationship satisfaction and communication, with benefits extending to higher risk, lower income couples. Besides traditional face-to-face approaches, other approaches, including online and blended approaches have emerged and been found effective. This study experimentally evaluates the effects of Traditional, Website, and Blended approaches. The hypotheses were examined using multiple group latent growth curve modeling with Bayesian estimation. On four of the nine measures among wives and two of the nine measures among husbands, all experimental groups showed significant improvement. Website couples showed the greatest change, followed by Blended couples. 

Objectives

Participants will learn common approaches used in marriage and relationship education (MRE).Participants will learn the relative effectiveness of four different methods of marriage and relationship education.Participants will learn the implications of the presented research findings for marriage and relationship education.

Hitting the Mark: A Latent Trajectory Analysis of Relationship Quality Across a Stepfamily Education Course

By Bryan Spuhler, Kay Bradford, Joshua Novak, Brian Higginbotham

As relationship education (RE) evaluation practices continue to evolve, researchers seek to better understand for whom these programs are effective and for whom they are not. Using growth mixture modeling we identify three latent trajectories of relationship quality among a stepfamily RE program’s participants’ (N=777). We then identify predictors of membership within each trajectory. By identifying groups who are benefitting (reporting improvements in relationship quality across time) and groups who are not (experiencing stagnant or declining relationship quality) we provide suggestions to modify the curriculum to better address the needs of those who are not benefitting.

Objectives

To identify latent trajectories in relationship quality over time among a group of participants in a stepfamily education course. To then further investigate variables which predict membership within those trajectories in order to better evaluate the program’s effectiveness within various groups. To identify modifications to the curriculum which could be made to better serve more at-risk populations. 

The Dyadic Influences of Mindfulness on Relationship Quality

By Julianne McGill, Leah Burke, Francesca Adler-Baeder

This study assessed the dyadic associations between three facets of mindfulness and relationship quality for 847 heterosexual couples. Preliminary results from an actor-partner interdependence model using cross-sectional data indicate non-reactivity to inner experience is the most closely linked with both self and partner’s reports of relationship quality. Acting with awareness also is uniquely related to individual reports of relationship quality for both men and women. Future directions and implications for programmatic efforts are discussed.

Objectives

Understand the relative importance of facets of mindfulness for couple relationship qualityDiscover possible partner influences of mindfulness on reported relationship qualityContribute to the discussion surrounding theory integration for studies assessing mindfulness in the family sciences

Bundle name
Conference Session